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DC5n United States art in english 26 articles, created at 2021-12-06 03:51 articles set mostly positive rate 2.0
(4.74/5)  1 
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What We Learned From Week 13 in the N.F.L.

A rested Kyler Murray dazzled against the Bears, the Chargers went for broke to beat the Bengals, and the Lions finally won one. 2021-12-06 00:07 8KB www.nytimes.com

(4.55/5)  2 
0.7
Bears LB Roquan Smith active vs. Cardinals

Smith injured his hamstring on the Thanksgiving against the Lions. He didn’t practice Thursday or Friday but participated in Friday’s practice in a limited fashion. 2021-12-05 16:31 1KB chicago.suntimes.com

(2.06/5)  3 
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Prince William Was ‘In a Trance’ During 2013 Musical Performance With Taylor Swift and Jon Bon Jovi

Prince William opened up about his impromptu musical performance with superstars Taylor Swift and Jon Bon Jovi in November 2013 — get details 2021-12-05 19:27 4KB www.usmagazine.com

(1.07/5)  4 
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Will Jussie Smollett take the stand? Critical question remains as actor’s trial resumes Monday

Experts say that Smollett has to tell his story to sway a jury. 2021-12-05 13:00 5KB chicago.suntimes.com

(1.05/5)  5 
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‘Encanto,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Gucci’ hang on to top 3 spots

All three films are playing exclusively in theaters. 2021-12-05 22:45 2KB www.pressherald.com

(1.05/5)  6 
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Expo 2020's workers face hardships despite Dubai's promises

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Intent on making a flawless impression as the first host of the world's fair in the Middle East, Dubai sought … 2021-12-05 12:22 12KB abcnews.go.com

(0.02/5)  7 
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Giants aren’t displaying any of the traits Joe Judge keeps promising

OK. It’s December. The holiday season is here. Peace on earth, good will toward men, be of good cheer, all of that. In the spirit … 2021-12-05 23:25 4KB nypost.com

(0.02/5)  8 
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Why we still love Lucy

"Sunday Morning" looks back at the creation of a TV classic, and the powerful hold that Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz still have on the popular imagination 70 years later. 2021-12-05 14:11 7KB www.cbsnews.com

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Joanne Shenandoah, Indigenous singer of majestic lyricism, dies at 64

She played guitar, piano, flute, cello and other instruments, gave up to 200 concerts a year, and sold millions of recordings. 2021-12-06 00:25 7KB www.pressherald.com

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10 Dramatic Courtroom Dramas That Will Have You Gripped

Beyond any reasonable doubt, these courtroom movie and television scenes will have you engrossed. 2021-12-06 00:00 4KB www.newsweek.com

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FBI: Images Show Dark Truth About Renowned Collector

Amateur archaeologists and collectors have long conducted their own unsanctioned digs at sites around the country, flying under the radar of various laws designed to protect,. 2021-12-05 22:20 2KB www.newser.com

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When Is Jodie Whittaker Regenerating on 'Doctor Who'?

Jodie Whittaker is the 13th Doctor, and she'll be bidding farewell to the character after becoming the first female actor to portray the Gallifreyan Time Lord. 2021-12-05 22:00 3KB www.newsweek.com

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Billie Eilish Changed Her Hair Color Again — And Announced A New Video

The rising pop star is once again a brunette. 2021-12-05 21:17 2KB uproxx.com

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In Ghana, I’ve been embraced by a community welcoming me home

There is something about this place that captivates my heart, soul and mind. 2021-12-05 20:00 5KB chicago.suntimes.com

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Marcus Lamb's death highlights Christian media's vaccine problem

The media may not be paying enough attention to the influence of Christian broadcasters when it comes to Covid-19, CNN chief media correspondent Brian Stelter said on "Reliable Sources" Sunday. 2021-12-05 19:11 2KB edition.cnn.com

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Andria Rose Is Bound To Blow Up, & These Lyrics Showcase Her Talent

Up and coming Latinx artist Andria Rose's single "In The Abstract" has a lot of personal meaning behind it. 2021-12-05 18:45 3KB www.elitedaily.com

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10 Films You Probably Forgot Were Christmas Movies—and Where to Watch Them

From Santa season shark attacks to Christmas killer thrillers, here are some films that deserve a place in your December streaming list. 2021-12-05 18:00 2KB www.newsweek.com

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Miami Design District Offers Creative Exhibits Through Winter 2022

Art Basel may be over, but now that the crowds are gone, programming remains. 2021-12-05 14:16 5KB www.forbes.com

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Music critics mock Kenny G's 'safe sax.' But a new documentary will change how you see him

If the Jazz Police began launching midnight raids against musicians who offended their sensibilities, Kenny G might be at the top of their list. But a new film may inspire his critics to reconsider. 2021-12-05 13:33 7KB edition.cnn.com

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There is an environmental impact each time you hit 'buy now'. Here's an alternative

Buying stuff is a part of America's DNA. It's a tradition that really took off near the end of World War II , when … 2021-12-05 13:00 4KB www.npr.org

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Automatic Zen Garden? This Connected Kinetic Sand Table Is Modern Relaxation

The HoMedics Drift sand table is part decoration and part mental wellness, but as a whole, it is completely captivating. 2021-12-05 13:00 6KB www.newsweek.com

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False Nostalgia

The "good old days" weren't all that good—but they're still messing with politics. 2021-12-05 12:00 19KB reason.com

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"48 Hours" show schedule

True-crime. Social justice. Impact. To miss it would be a crime. 2021-12-05 07:36 30KB www.cbsnews.com

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Kat Edmonson takes a jazz pop swing at Christmas classics

From the start, the Texas-born singer was blurring the lines between classic and alternative: Her first album in 2009 opened with back-to-back covers of Gershwin’s “Summertime” and The Cure’s “Just Like Heaven,” the latter done as a sultry torch ballad. 2021-12-05 05:27 4KB www.bostonherald.com

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Treat yourself to a girls’ night out – holiday edition

That means dressing up a little, hitting the town, ordering a round of drinks, and getting creative with how and where you relax with your favorite ladies. 2021-12-05 05:09 3KB www.bostonherald.com

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Arianna, 14, loves being ballet dancer

She does very well with her peers and is able to build and maintain healthy relationships. 2021-12-05 05:08 1KB www.bostonherald.com

Articles

DC5n United States art in english 26 articles, created at 2021-12-06 03:51

 

 1 /26 

0.2
What We Learned From Week 13 in the N.F.L.
(4.74/5)

Kyler Murray dazzles in his own unpredictable way. Sure, there are other N.F.L. quarterbacks who thrill. Lamar Jackson’s runs tempt defenses to forget the threat of his arm. Patrick Mahomes fuses multiple sports in his interpretation of the position. Josh Allen and Justin Herbert’s accuracy on shockingly long throws invigorate. But no one zigs and zags and zigs again with such mesmerizing abandon as Murray, the Arizona Cardinals’ quarterback. His mostly flawless performance on Sunday in a 33-22 win against the Chicago Bears, in which he had two passing touchdowns and two running touchdowns, provided Week 13’s clearest takeaway: The Cardinals’ conservative approach to Kyler Murray’s return will pay off. The urge to hurry Murray, a 5-foot-10, 207-pound turbine, back onto the field from an ankle injury that had kept him out after Week 8 had to be overwhelming for the Cardinals. This is the same team that started 5-2 in 2020 only to free-fall to 8-8 and miss the playoffs. With Murray, Arizona had a seven-game win streak to start the season. Without him, the team was 2-1, losing to the Carolina Panthers and playing the reeling Seattle Seahawks a bit too close on the road. Perhaps no head coach’s seat was hotter than Kliff Kingsbury’s entering the season, and in a cutthroat division, the N.F.C. West, sitting Murray through November could have started a second-half spiral that pointed fingers at the coach. But the Cardinals (10-2) resisted rushing Murray back, and while other quarterbacks battle pinkie toe injuries (Aaron Rodgers), pinkie finger injuries (Joe Burrow) and everything in between, Murray looked reinvigorated in his return. There was no rust. Receiver DeAndre Hopkins was also back from a hamstring injury, and he and Murray wasted no time reconnecting. On fourth-and-2, four minutes into the game, Murray laced a 20-yard strike to Hopkins in stride for a touchdown catch. As a runner, Murray did not appear to nurse his ankle. On third-and-goal on the very next drive, with Bears defensive end Robert Quinn breathing down his neck, Murray took off for a 9-yard touchdown run. This score was quintessential Murray, too, freezing the Bears (4-8) with a pump fake and a stutter step on that ankle to get to the pylon. In the second half, Murray’s third-and-1 scramble for 14 yards — again taking off with no qualms — led to a field goal that gave the Cardinals a 24-7 lead. And the Cardinals put the Bears away with 6 minutes 23 seconds left on Murray’s second touchdown run. He brilliantly held his mesh point on a run fake until the last moment to freeze defensive end Trevis Gipson before pulling the ball and whip-snapping into the end zone. There’s no tried-and-true handbook for dealing with a high ankle sprain. Other quarterbacks have returned sooner, and each injury is unique. Murray took the full month to recover because the Cardinals need him and the creative juking reminiscent of Allen Iverson that can carry Arizona deep into the playoffs. Obviously, all the starting and stopping can put a lot of stress on Murray’s ankles. Rushing him back could have meant that he’d be 50 to 75 percent healthy the rest of the way — not ideal in a conference with Tom Brady and Rodgers, or in a regular season with a newly added 17th game. Now the Cardinals are positioned to do exactly what they could not in 2020: finish strong. Murray can’t do it alone. Any team with any realistic shot at a Super Bowl needs legitimate stars on defense, and despite losing J.J. Watt for the season, that’s not a problem in Arizona. The Cardinals intercepted Bears quarterback Andy Dalton four times with safety Budda Baker returning his pick 77 yards. Baker has been phenomenal all season. Perhaps no defensive back in the sport is as physical in the run game and breaks so aggressively on balls in the secondary. Up front, Chandler Jones remains one of the game’s most underrated players. All Jones, the Cardinals’ edge rusher, has done is total 105½ sacks in 134 career games, and his tip of a pass led to one of Dalton’s interceptions. Not that Bears fans needed any more salt in their wounds, but it is worth noting that nine years ago they drafted Boise State outside linebacker Shea McClellin 19th overall instead of Jones, who went two picks later to the New England Patriots. McClellin’s N.F.L. career ended in 2016. The Cardinals’ management of their roster, especially in contrast with the Bears, has Arizona in the driver’s seat heading into the final leg of the regular season. The Chargers are sticking with what works. Once again, the grim reaper appeared to be poking his head out from the tunnel, typical for how seasons tended to end for the San Diego and Los Angeles Chargers for an entire generation. Yet on Sunday, the Chargers again suggested that those days are behind them under Coach Brandon Staley. After nearly squandering a 24-point lead, the Chargers pulled away from the Cincinnati Bengals for a crucial 41-22 win. Quarterback Justin Herbert outdueled Joe Burrow, and now the Chargers (7-5), who began the day a game back of Kansas City, can still harbor realistic hopes of winning the cluttered A.F.C. West. With his team going 3-4 over its last seven games, Staley has tried to lift the curse by remaining aggressive in his play-calling. On the game’s first drive, the Chargers went for it on fourth-and-goal and Herbert connected with receiver Keenan Allen for one of his two touchdown passes to the team’s top wideout. With 10 minutes remaining in the first half, Herbert lofted a 44-yard score to the deep threat Jalen Guyton, who used a nifty shimmy and shake on his route to break free. According to Next Gen Stats, the ball traveled 61.2 yards in the air, the second-longest for any quarterback this season. This score gave the Chargers a 24-0 lead. Promptly, everything started to go wrong. The Bengals (7-5) clawed their way back into the game thanks to three Los Angeles turnovers. Two fumbles by running back Austin Ekeler sandwiched a Herbert interception late in the second quarter that first hit receiver Josh Palmer’s hands. The Bengals got the score as close as 24-22 heading into the fourth quarter, but Cincinnati running back Joe Mixon picked a bad time to lose a fumble for just the second time since 2018. After making a cut, he simply dropped the ball, and Chargers cornerback Tevaughn Campbell returned it 61 yards for a touchdown. With Burrow hurting, Cincinnati never caught up. The Chargers are still a tough read. Their 4-1 start gave way to a slide in which they lost four of their next six, behind a defense that has been bad against the run. Sunday’s win over a surging Bengals team should fill Los Angeles, and Staley, with confidence that its talented offense can go drive for drive with anyone. Around the N.F.L. Lions 29, Vikings 27: The Lions have discovered new, insufferable ways to lose every week. But not today. After fumbling away the lead with four minutes to go, quarterback Jared Goff redeemed himself by leading Detroit on a 14-play, 75-yard touchdown drive in just 1:50. His 11-yard touchdown pass to Amon-Ra St. Brown at the buzzer ended the season's longest winless streak. Buccaneers 30, Falcons 17: Tom Brady threw a brutal pick-6 against Atlanta at the end of the first half. But he once again bounced back from an egregious mistake to torment the Falcons, finishing with 368 passing yards and four touchdowns. Brady didn’t take a sack on 51 dropbacks. Colts 31, Texans 0: Nothing like a date with the hapless Texans to get back on track. Jonathan Taylor continued to pad his M.V.P. résumé with 143 yards on 32 attempts and two touchdowns. Dolphins 20, Giants 9: Miami continued to tear through a soft stretch of its schedule, and Tua Tagovailoa was efficient again, going 30 of 41 for 244 yards with two touchdowns and no interceptions. The Dolphins have won five straight. Eagles 33, Jets 18: Gardner Minshew and his handlebar mustache took over, in place of the injured Jalen Hurts, leading the Eagles to score on seven of their eight offensive possessions. Minshew found a quick rapport with tight end Dallas Goedert (102 yards, two touchdowns).
NFL Week 13 schedule, scores, updates and more
foxnews.com
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NFL Week 13 fantasy football inactives watch - Who's in and who's out?
espn.com
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NFL Week 13 takeaways - What we learned, big questions for every game and future team outlooks
espn.com
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NFL Week 13 predictions: Ride with Derek Carr and the Raiders
nypost.com
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List of inactive players for NFL games in Week 13
wtop.com
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N.F.L. Week 13 Predictions: Our Picks Against the Spread
nytimes.com
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Giants vs. Dolphins odds, analysis and predictions for all Week 13 NFL games
nypost.com
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Fantasy football rankings - NFL Week 13
espn.com
781cf7ca488a482e26d65a0073eb99b5

 

 2 /26 

0.7
Bears LB Roquan Smith active vs. Cardinals
(4.55/5)

The Bears’ best defensive player will give it a go against the Cardinals. Inside linebacker Roquan Smith will be active Sunday at Soldier Field. He injured his hamstring on the Thanksgiving against the Lions. He didn’t practice Thursday or Friday but participated in Friday’s practice in a limited fashion. Wide receiver Allen Robinson, who hasn’t practiced since hurting his hamstring making a fourth-quarter catch against the Steelers, was called doubtful in the team’s official injury report Friday. The Bears ruled him out Sunday. Rookie quarterback Justin Fields, whom the Bears said wouldn’t play, was officially made inactive Sunday. Nick Foles will suit up and be the Bears’ second-stringer. Fields is still recovering from cracked ribs, an injury he suffered two weeks ago against the Ravens. The Bears on Friday ruled out standout defensive tackle Akiem Hicks [ankle], wide receiver Marquise Goodwin [foot/ribs], defensive end Mario Edwards [ribs] and running back Damien Williams [calf] after they didn’t practice all week. Safety Teez Tabor will be a healthy scratch. The Cardinals’ two biggest offensive stars — quarterback Kyler Murray and receiver DeAndre Hopkins — will play. The team called them both game-time decisions on Friday.
Cardinals QB Kyler Murray to play vs. Bears
chicago.suntimes.com
17f3c02971c923d6de81ff23bf9e5a1c
Cardinals Unleash NFL’s ‘Most Dangerous Weapon’ on Bears
heavy.com
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Week 13 updates: Roquan Smith is active for the Chicago Bears, while Kyler Murray and DeAndre Hopkins will play for the Arizona Cardinals
ocregister.com
4a57f993806db4e5a069d889f8c09b4d
Week 13 updates: Roquan Smith is active for the Chicago Bears, while Kyler Murray and DeAndre Hopkins will play for the Arizona Cardinals
bostonherald.com
b58ea33b2c5cd1c0375379e2234b72e6
The Latest: Cardinals’ Murray, Hopkins active vs. Bears
wtop.com
89a0b79c59050f945cf22e12095d743b
Takeaways from the Bears’ loss to Cardinals
chicago.suntimes.com
de99ff70ccd1e1974c930f688e2bb3f3

 

 3 /26 

0.4
Prince William Was ‘In a Trance’ During 2013 Musical Performance With Taylor Swift and Jon Bon Jovi
(2.06/5)

Fond memories. Prince William initially made headlines after his impromptu musical collaboration with Taylor Swift and Jon Bon Jovi in November 2013, and he’s finally explained how he ended up so “out of his comfort zone.” “So, around about – it must be nearly 10 years ago now – I can’t believe I’m actually telling this story. I went to a charity fundraising gala for Centrepoint, which is a young homeless charity that I am very fond of and have supported for many years,” the Duke of Cambridge, 39, recalled on the Monday, December 6, episode of the “Time to Walk” series for Apple Fitness+. “It’s an annual fundraiser, and I turn up, and Jon Bon Jovi and Taylor Swift are at the event, which nearly knocked me off my feet.” While the England native initially thought he’d make his planned speech before having a relaxed evening eating a nice dinner and watching the musical icons perform their greatest hits, he couldn’t imagine he’d be up on the stage beside them. “I’m sat next to Taylor Swift, she’s on my left, and after Jon does his first song, there’s a pause, and she turns to me. She puts her hand on my arm, looks me in the eye, and says, ‘Come on, William. Let’s go and sing,’” the father of three — he shares Prince George, 8, Princess Charlotte, 6, and Prince Louis, 3, with wife Duchess Kate — explained via ET Canada. “To this day, I still do not know what came over me. Honestly, even now, I’m cringing at what happened next, and I don’t understand why I gave in. But, frankly, if Taylor Swift looks you in the eye, touches your arm, and says, ‘Come with me.’ I got up like a puppy and went, ‘Yeah, OK, that seems like a great idea. I’ll follow you.’” He continued: “I walked up on stage in a trance, and then sort of halfway through Jon Bon Jovi’s ‘Livin’ On a Prayer’ song, I wake up, and I’m thinking to myself, ‘Am I standing on the stage singing ‘Livin’ On a Prayer’ when I don’t even know the words,’ but the Centrepoint young guys and girls were there, all loving it and cheering away. So I thought, ‘Well, if they’re enjoying it, then the night is for them. So sod it. I can’t be the doofus who’s going to ruin it for everyone.’” While William was nervous to publicly sing — and to remember the 59-year-old crooner’s lyrics — he was ultimately glad to take that step out of his comfortable boundaries. “At times, when you’re taken out of your comfort zone, you’ve got to roll with it,” the University of St. Andrews alum added. “And I think we’ve gotten to the stage in this life where we do micromanage ourselves. We do worry about: How do we look on social media? Who said what about me? What am I wearing? There’s so many pressures, but I think making a fool of yourself is OK. It’s OK to not take yourself too seriously and have those moments where you let go and you just go, ‘Do you know what? I’m OK with this.’” The Winter Whites Gala in Aid of Centrepoint, in which William’s been the patron since 2005, was the 31-year-old “Lover” songstress’ first royal gathering. While there, she had the opportunity to belt a medley of her popular hits. During the festivities, she couldn’t help but gush over the magical experience. “Oh my God, this is so incredibly exciting to be performing at Kensington Palace,” the Cats actress told Us Weekly upon her arrival at the time. “With the snow, the lighting, the decorations, it’s all so Christmas-y. It’s kind of surreal, right? I’m at a palace! I’m just soaking it all in. It’s going to be a great night.”
Prince William Recalls ‘Cringe’ Moment Taylor Swift Led Him Onstage To Sing With Bon Jovi
hollywoodlife.com
d136b517ebf06bd203805b46b33fea98
Prince William recalls singing with Taylor Swift and Jon Bon Jovi: ‘I’m cringing’
pagesix.com
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 4 /26 

0.0
Will Jussie Smollett take the stand? Critical question remains as actor’s trial resumes Monday
(1.07/5)

The trial of actor Jussie Smollett is set to resume Monday, and there would seem to be plenty of dramatic turns left in a saga that has spent almost three years in the headlines. Smollett’s lawyers have yet to say whether the actor will take the stand, but veteran attorneys say it’s almost certain the “Empire” star will have to tell his story himself to win over the jury. The defense is expected to call several more witnesses to try to poke holes in Special Prosecutor Dan Webb’s theory that Smollett hired brothers Olabinjo and Abimbola Osundairo and staged the attack himself. Smollett’s attorneys have repeatedly raised questions about whether police sufficiently pursued leads about a woman who reported seeing a suspicious white man with a rope in the hours before the attack, as well as a security guard in the River North area who claimed he saw a white man in a ski mask run past him around the time of the alleged attack. The defense team has also questioned police officers on the stand about a taxi driver who allegedly saw one of the Osundairo brothers using a cellphone in his cab that night, contradicting both brothers’ claims they left their phones at home at Smollett’s request. On Thursday, Judge James Linn told jurors that he expected to send them the case for deliberation on Monday or Tuesday at the latest after giving them a long weekend with Friday off. The defense team began calling witnesses Thursday after Webb rested the state’s case, closing out with testimony by each of the Osundairos that took up two days of the trial. The brothers said Smollett paid them to fake a hate crime in which they would rough him up, shouting gay and racial slurs while wearing “Make America Great Again” hats, then loop a noose over his head and douse him with bleach. Smollett’s motive, they said, was dissatisfaction with the way the television studio behind his then-hit show “Empire” had handled his security after he received a piece of hate mail — which prosecutors have also said the actor fabricated. Smollett, they said, staged the attack near a police surveillance camera in order to get video of the assault that he could post to social media. Late Thursday, Smollett’s former music manager testified that he was on the phone with the actor when “he got jumped.” Brandon Moore said he was talking about midnight from Los Angles about details for an upcoming concert Smollett was going to perform at when he heard someone use an anti-gay slur. Moore said he heard Smollett respond to the person, and then heard scuffling until the actor apparently dropped his phone. When Smollett got back on the line, he told Moore he had been jumped and “sounded panicked. and out of breath.” Moore told him to get back to his home. Dr. Robert Turelli, who treated Smollett at Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s emergency room, said Smollett had cuts on his face, redness around his neck and complained of pain to his ribs. Smollett was given Tylenol for the pain, according to Turelli, who said Smollett’s medical records indicated he had declined other medications. A CT scan and X-rays were also ordered, which ruled out additional injuries. Under cross examination, Turelli said he had no way of knowing how Smollett was injured. Thursday’s final defense witness was Smollett’s L. A. -based publicist, Pamela Sharp, who described the actor as a “a very nice person” who “always paid his bills on time.” Smollett’s career was reaching new heights at the time of the attack, Sharp said. He was directing episodes of “Empire” and earning $2 million per season at that point. He was also preparing for a “historic” storyline on the show where his character would be married in the first nationally televised wedding of a gay Black man. Sharp said she believed Smollett was innocent — a comment the judge immediately told the jury to disregard — and said she doubted he would have participated in an attack that might damage his face, which she called the “key to every actor’s career.” April Preyar, a Chicago defense attorney who has watched most of the trial as one of the few spectators in courtroom gallery, said that she came to the trial assuming Smollett’s case would be a slam dunk for the prosecution. After four days of the trial, Preyar believes the defense has put some dents in the state’s case — but to get an acquittal, Smollett has to take the stand with a plausible story and a personality that wins over jurors. “He has to take the stand. He is the only one that can tell the story, the only one who was there besides the brothers,” Preyar said. Attorney Kulmeet “Bob” Galhotra, who has followed the case closely online and in the press, said he still thinks jurors are likely to convict, simply because Smollett’s version of the case— that the Osundairos were secretly homophobic and tried to exploit the openly gay Smollett to boost their acting careers — is more convoluted than the notion that Smollett just planned the attack and hired them. “But [Smollett] has to hit the stand to tell it,” said Galhotra, who added the actor will need all his acting chops to keep his cool under cross-examination. “He’s gotta perform, but it’s still going to be problematic for the defense.” On the witness stand, Preyar said she can only assume Smollett will come across well. “I think he testifies,” she said. “And [the trial] is going to come down to, who does the jury like better: Ola and Abel, or Jussie?”
Will Jussie Smollett testify in Chicago trial? Legal experts weigh in
usatoday.com
9bbffbbb178e4c4468854b8d8587a58b

 

 5 /26 

0.5
‘Encanto,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Gucci’ hang on to top 3 spots
(1.05/5)

Leftovers were on the menu for moviegoers in North America this weekend. “Encanto,” “Ghostbusters: Afterlife” and “House of Gucci” repeated in the top three spots, according to studio estimates on Sunday. All three films are playing exclusively in theaters. The weekend after Thanksgiving is usually pretty quiet at the box office and this year was no exception considering new offerings like “Flee” and “Benedetta” were playing only in limited release. Disney’s “Encanto,” an animated tale with original music from Lin-Manuel Miranda, earned $12.7 million to take the top spot, down 53 percent from its opening last weekend. Globally, it’s earned $116.1 million to date. “Ghostbusters: Afterlife” took second place in its third weekend with $10.4 million, pushing it just past the $100 million threshold. And Ridley Scott’s ripped from the headlines “House of Gucci,” starring Lady Gaga and Adam Driver, came in third place in its second weekend with $6.8 million from 3,477 locations, bringing its domestic total to $33.6 million. In other notable showings, Warner Bros.’ brought “Dune” back to IMAX screens this weekend. The premium screens accounted for over half of its $1.8 million domestic earnings. Neon’s animated documentary “Flee” also opened on four screens, earning $25,033. The film is about a man who fled Afghanistan as a child in the 1980s. Things should pick up next week as Steven Spielberg’s take on “West Side Story” dances into theaters nationwide. Success. Please wait for the page to reload. If the page does not reload within 5 seconds, please refresh the page. Enter your email and password to access comments. Forgot Password? Don't have a Talk profile? Create one. Invalid username/password. Please check your email to confirm and complete your registration. Create a commenting profile by providing an email address, password and display name. You will receive an email to complete the registration. Please note the display name will appear on screen when you participate. Already registered? Log in to join the discussion. Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or login to participate in the conversation. Here’s why. Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code. Send questions/comments to the editors. « Previous Next»
Box Office: ‘Encanto’ And ‘Ghostbusters’ Tops Hollywood’s Deadest Weekend
forbes.com
f42d4969e7b4b3f3e9310c41a4cff6ee

 

 6 /26 

0.3
Expo 2020's workers face hardships despite Dubai's promises
(1.05/5)

Arab Emirates -- Intent on making a flawless impression as the first host of the world's fair in the Middle East, Dubai sought to leave nothing to chance. It poured billions of dollars into its pristine fairgrounds and jubilant festivities that opened last month, aiming for 25 million visits to the pandemic-delayed Expo 2020. Propping up the world's fair is the United Arab Emirates’ contentious labor system that long has drawn accusations of mistreating workers. Highly sensitive to its image and aware that Expo attracts more attention to its labor practices, Dubai has held companies on the project to higher-than-normal standards of worker treatment. Contractors offer benefits and better wages to Expo workers, compared with elsewhere in the country, and many are grateful for the jobs. Yet according to human rights groups and interviews with over two dozen workers, violations have persisted, underpinned by the UAE's labor sponsorship system. It relies on complicated chains of foreign subcontracts, ties workers’ residency to their jobs and gives outsized power to employers. Among the complaints are workers having to pay exorbitant and illegal fees to local recruiters in order to work at the world's fair; employers confiscating their passports; broken promises on wages; crowded and unsanitary living conditions in dormitories; substandard or unaffordable food; and up to 70-hour workweeks in sometimes brutal heat. “You can have the best standards in the world, but if you have this inherent power imbalance, workers are in a situation where they’re at risk of exploitation all the time,” said Mustafa Qadri, executive director of Equidem Research, a labor rights consultancy that recently reported on the mistreatment of Expo workers during the pandemic. When questioned by The Associated Press, Expo organizers did not comment but referred to their previous statement in response to Equidem’s report, saying Expo takes worker welfare “extremely seriously” and requires all contractors to comply with standards “formulated from international best practice.” Expo's statement acknowledged the workers' “most regularly raised topics of concern” involved “wage payments and food,” without elaborating. It said authorities have “worked directly with contractors to remedy both immediately.” “Some cases have been identified where accommodation facilities have been found to not be in line with UAE legal requirements,” it added. “In such cases we work with a contractor to move workers to adequate accommodation facilities.” Citing labor abuses at Expo and other human rights concerns, the European Parliament has urged a boycott of the event. The UAE called the resolution “factually incorrect", without elaborating. Emirati authorities did not respond to the AP's repeated requests for comment. PAYING A HIGH PRICE TO WORK Mohammed, 27, is among scores of workers who clean the fairgrounds eight hours a day. A ceramic-tile salesman in Ghana, he’d dreamed of life in the skyscraper-studded cities of the Persian Gulf and the chance to send badly needed cash to his parents and six brothers and sisters. A recruiter in Ghana's southern city of Kumasi had promised him over $500 a month, including food and housing, Mohammed said. But to get the job, he’d have to pay a fee of $1,150, using years of savings. The agent assured him that he’d make that back in no time. When he arrived, however, Mohammed learned he was to earn as little as $190 a month, and the promised food was undercooked rice and sausage he couldn't stomach, forcing him to buy meals. He said the Abu Dhabi-based contractor that sponsored his work visa appeared to have no idea he had paid a small fortune to recruiters, a common practice in the UAE despite a government ban. For six months of work, he would make less than what he paid to get the job. “If I had known, I never would have come,” said Mohammed, who asked to be identified by only his first name because he feared reprisals. Most workers interviewed by the AP spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear of losing their jobs after Expo officials warned them against talking to journalists. Thousands of low-wage laborers from Africa, Southeast Asia and the Middle East, barred from forming unions, toil up to 70 hours a week at Expo, living in crowded, dormitory-style housing, according to the workers and labor rights researchers. They’re among millions from poor countries who come to Gulf Arab sheikhdoms to create massive government projects and serve small local populations as construction and domestic workers, janitors, cooks, garbage collectors and guards. PACKED DORMS, ONE TOILET FOR 80 WORKERS Equidem documented multiple cases of abuse at Expo’s construction site when the pandemic began. Workers described going hungry as employers withheld up to five months of wages and termination benefits. Some were deprived of their identification documents, unable to change jobs or leave the country. Others were fired without warning and got stranded in the UAE. Several told of plunging into debt over high recruiting fees. Those interviewed for Equidem's report were primarily from India and Pakistan, attracted by average salaries of $300 a month, along with room and board. Many lived in packed accommodations that in one case saw 12 people crammed in a room and in another had over 80 people sharing a single toilet as the coronavirus coursed across the country. Equidem reported that these issues specifically plagued four major UAE-based service and construction contractors: Ghantoot Gulf Contracting, Transguard Security, Al Naboodah Construction Group and JML Facades. All continue to operate at Expo. Transguard said it complied fully with UAE labor laws and "makes every effort to ensure that all our practices are legal and ethical,” including “strict adherence to regulations that require salaries be paid in full and on time.” Transguard Group is a subsidiary of the state conglomerate that also owns the long-haul airline Emirates. The other three companies did not respond to requests for comment. In interviews with the AP, over two dozen workers described other forms of exploitation, with inadequate food a central concern. Many complained of long hours in hazardous heat. Several workers from West Africa and Pakistan said they'd paid hundreds of dollars in recruiting fees to unscrupulous agents, as Mohammed did. Others said employers confiscated their passports. Expo’s worker welfare policy demands employers “ensure fair and free recruitment" and “respect the right of employees to retain their personal documents." ‘WORK, SLEEP, WORK, SLEEP’ Eric, a cleaner from Cameroon, said he and his colleagues protested to Dubai-based Emrill Services about the lack of kitchen access and affordable food but got no response. They make less than $300 a month, with no food allowance. Desperate to cover his younger brothers’ school fees at home, Eric said he can't buy more than a plate or two of spaghetti from the canteen, and three meals a day would cost over half his salary. “Everyone is complaining that the food is too expensive,” he said. “We don’t eat to our satisfaction because if you do, you will have no salary by the month’s end." In response to a request for comment, Emrill promised to investigate the complaints, saying it “takes employee well-being very seriously.” Various companies at Expo offer workers free food or allow them to cook their own. Others provide a food allowance of some $80 a month, although several workers said that without refrigerators or easy kitchen access, they live on sour milk and store-bought bread. Guards at the Expo entrance working for Dubai-based company Arkan said they were promised hot meals at a cafeteria during the break in an eight-hour shift. Despite repeatedly asking supervisors in the past three months, the guards received nothing, leaving them hungry throughout the day. Arkan did not respond to requests for comment. In other cases, management has been more responsive. When one staffer from Malawi said he mobilized workers angered by their monotonous rice diet to complain to their bosses at ADNH Compass, the food improved, with meat options added. “It’s a strange feeling,” said a 30-year-old janitor from Togo. “Your mother, your father, your nephew, your uncle, they call you and think (because) you travel, you’re a rich man. They don’t know you're not eating.” Expo’s security guards are ubiquitous — predominantly African men in black polo shirts, stationed across the vast, sunbaked grounds. They work the longest hours — typically 13-hour shifts, including a 40-minute lunch. The grind begins at dawn when buses pull up to their enormous dormitories near Dubai’s port and airport. Aside from brief breaks, they spend hours in the withering weather. Many began in July and August, as the fair prepared to open, when temperatures exceeded 50 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) with high humidity. Recent research published in the Cardiology Journal on workers building stadiums for Qatar’s 2022 World Cup cited potentially fatal effects of heat on young laborers. Adding to the pressures is the constant surveillance, many guards said, with managers threatening penalties and salary deductions for breaks that stretch too long, or accidental dozing. “If you show up late for attendance, if you close your eyes on the job, if you go inside too many times, you’ll lose pay for a day at least,” said one Indian guard with Dubai-based First Security Group, describing his manager’s threats at roll call. “We deserve more than 2,400 dirhams ($650 a month) for this kind of stress.” Workers have little say over how they spend their days, shuttling back and forth between fairgrounds and dormitories, where four to six people share a room. For many, that lack of freedom is a core complaint of the labor system, where absconding from employers is grounds for arrest and deportation. “Work, sleep, work, sleep. There's no freedom,” said a 40-year-old guard from Kenya. “The pressure is the same all over the UAE. You just need to try to survive one day to another.” Although most workers interviewed said their employers returned their identity documents after applying for their visas, at least six people who wanted to keep their passports said they could not — another common practice outlawed in the UAE. A few cleaners with Emrill said they’d apparently signed consent forms they didn’t understand, allowing the company to hold their documents. Emrill told the AP it respects workers' right to keep their documents, but “offers employees the option to keep any identification document, including passports, in the company safe for safekeeping.” Dozens of other workers declined to talk to the AP, fearing revocation of their contract and other reprisals if they spoke about their concerns, even though Expo's policy requires companies to “allow employees freedom to exercise their legal rights without fear of reprisal." One parking attendant said he was "bound by protocol not to answer a question from a journalist.” Ahead of the global event, authorities failed to answer questions from journalists about worker deaths and injuries. As the fair opened, Expo officials gave conflicting figures for how many workers had been killed during construction. Despite the difficult conditions, most cleaners, guards and parking attendants said they’re grateful for jobs that allow them to help their families back home. Their salaries far exceed what they’d make there or even what they’d earn for the same job in the parking lots of Dubai’s skyscrapers and marbled malls. Security guards at Expo earn about $55 more per month than they would outside it. Many also feel they’re contributing to the event's efforts to unite countries and cultures. At the fair's Jubilee Park, nestled between a stage and popular pub, a somber tribute to workers rises from the pavement. A roll call of the 200,000 people who worked at Expo over the years wraps around stone columns. Although it is easy to miss, a small plaque on the monument reads: “Expo 2020 Dubai dedicates this monument to all our brothers and sisters who built the site.”
Expo 2020’s workers face hardships despite Dubai’s promises
wtop.com
56968e8cd6a9849e45d51600d04d575e
Expo 2020’s workers face hardships despite Dubai’s promises
wtop.com
7d0826848e37a7aea38af1f46b699cea

 

 7 /26 

1.2
Giants aren’t displaying any of the traits Joe Judge keeps promising
(0.02/5)

OK. It’s December. The holiday season is here. Peace on earth, good will toward men, be of good cheer, all of that. In the spirit of the season, let’s see if we can show some good will and good cheer with the Giants. Let’s see if we can say something nice about them: Searching… Searching… Searching… Graham Gano is a fine placekicker. (Yes, that may seem a low bar. But have a look-see at what kind of day the other kicker in town had on Sunday.) Gano made three field goals Sunday afternoon at Hard Rock Stadium. One traveled 39 yards. One traveled 34 yards. One traveled 51 yards. He accounted for the entirety of the right side of the hyphen in this 20-9 loss to the Dolphins. Having a very good placekicker is a very good thing for a football team. When your very good placekicker is the very best thing about that team? That’s not so good. And thus ends the happy-talk part of this discussion about the Giants. They were dreadful across all 60 minutes of this rock fight in South Florida, unable to do just about anything offensively, unable to make the kind of game-changing big plays they made a week ago when they were able to steal one from the Eagles. But it’s actually worse than that, really. It’s worse than just another loss. The starting quarterback, Daniel Jones, is out with a bum neck and the backup quarterback, Mike Glennon, suffered a concussion, probably because the offensive line is a sieve that finally succumbed to Miami’s pressure. The defense was dinked and dunked and doinked to death by Dolphins QB Tua Tagovailoa. And Joe Judge… “There were a lot of things I saw today,” the Giants’ coach said. “A lot of things moving in the right direction.” Yeah. About that. Two weeks ago, after an eyesore loss at Tampa Bay, we finally saw the angry side of Judge. We finally saw some genuine flames behind his words. He was on the verge of firing offensive coordinator Jason Garrett, and almost certainly knew it was about to happen, so maybe that made it easier. But Judge has to know that we all saw the same game he saw Sunday. Has to know we’ve seen the same team he’s seen for 12 games this year. And has to know, deep in is heart, that the positive vibes he has managed to attract across the first 28 games of his career — 10 wins, 18 losses, if you’re keeping score at home — aren’t going to last forever. They have, it seems, already frayed. “The margin for error in this league is very small,” Judge said, and then he made the mistake of citing the Dolphins, who at one point this season lost seven games in a row (including one to the Jaguars) yet have now rattled off five wins in a row, a fine turnaround that only proves two points: It is bad enough that Giants fans can look to the NFL Death Star in Foxborough and see that a full end-to-end rebuild is possible in one year while the Giants toil in Year 5 of another endless spin. It is worse to see a fellow Bill Belichick disciple, Brian Flores, do what, in essence, Judge has been promising here for two years: Win with smarts, with toughness, with defense and with nerve. The Giants are not smart, burning two more timeouts Sunday so they wouldn’t be charged with delay of game penalties. They are not tough — you hit them in the mouth, they only rarely hit back. Their defense is fine, but still allowed the pop-gun Dolphins two TDs and two field goals. And Judge, normally willing to roll the dice, was shockingly conservative both in deciding to punt late in the third quarter and in not demanding the offense show more urgency in the fourth. The Dolphins are now very much in the AFC playoff picture. The Giants are not, no matter what the math says, no matter how badly anyone tries to twist and postulate and pave a path for them to the 7 seed. Not going to happen. Was never going to happen. The Giants needed to see progress this year. There have been only regressions across the board, and they get the Chargers in LA next Sunday. Perfect. But at least the placekicker is having a nice year.
Joe Judge defends Giants’ conservative decisions: ‘Play to our defense’
nypost.com
2aef5f2dfa078f7fd0bdd0f5df824cd9

 

 8 /26 

0.6
Why we still love Lucy
(0.02/5)

On a Hollywood lot where one of America's biggest stars ever first filmed her groundbreaking show, a young artist named Yolanda Glass has been hard at work. "One of the workers who came by who worked on the lot, he looked up and he was like, 'Lucy would be proud of this'" she told correspondent Jim Axelrod. "I can't describe how encouraging that felt." Yes, count this thirty-something among the millions who, 70 years after the premiere of "I Love Lucy", still love Lucy. Still love Lucille Ball stuffing her mouth to keep pace at Kramer's Kandy; still love her getting drunk pitching a health tonic that's 23% alcohol; still love her going mime-for-mime with Harpo Marx (almost); and still find Lucy both relevant and influential. Glass said, "There wouldn't be a myriad of the female and people of color who are comedians out right now without her foundation." The show's 180 episodes over six seasons on CBS followed the madcap adventures of Lucy Ricardo, and the trouble she whips up trying to break out of her mid-century middle-class life… married to Cuban bandleader Ricky Ricardo, played by her real-life husband, Desi Arnaz. Nowhere is the hold the show still has on the public easier to see than in Jamestown, New York, where Ball was born 110 years ago, and where two museums celebrate "I Love Lucy", featuring replicas of the show's iconic sets. "All I think about is the amount of extraordinarily well-done physical comedy that took place here", said Journey Gunderson, the executive director of both the Lucy-Desi Museum and the National Comedy Center. Axelrod asked, "Seventy years later, why is Lucille Ball still relevant?" "I think in some ways Lucille Ball's legacy can be appreciated now through a 2021 lens perhaps better than it ever has been able to be appreciated", Gunderson replied. Start with the series' enormous popularity. The episode in which Lucy gave birth, on January 19, 1953, reached 44 million viewers – 15 million more than watched Dwight Eisenhower be sworn in as our 34th President the following day. Lucy and Desi marked new territory for television – still evolving as a cultural institution. She was the All-American girl; he was a Cuban-born transplant. For its time, controversial casting that Lucille Ball insisted on, more than a decade before the height of the civil rights movement. "She risked everything", Gunderson said. "I think America raised its eyebrows, but then they quickly started laughing." Ball and Arnaz were TV pioneers in an impressive list of other ways as well. The laughter was so loud when they filmed, it was recorded and used for other shows, helping to launch "canned laughter" as a standard production technique. The show where she gave birth capped TV's first-ever pregnancy plotline on a big-three network sitcom. "It was still taboo for a woman who was pregnant to be out in the open in front of everyone", said Gunderson. And when Ball needed some time off post-delivery, Arnaz offered up a first that changed the Hollywood business model forever: just repeat some episodes that had already aired. Axelrod asked, "Desi Arnaz, father of reruns?" "Yes!" said Gunderson. "And the story goes that CBS executives laughed at him, and said, ''Who's gonna want to watch them after they aired?'" It turned out everyone would – which is why, 70 years later, Lucille and Desi are still cultural icons – the subject of a new Aaron Sorkin movie, "Being the Ricardos", with Nicole Kidman and Javier Bardem; and a novel, "The Queen of Tuesday", by Darin Strauss. "She was famous to a degree that hadn't existed before her, really", Strauss said. "When they'd cut to commercial, the water tables would drop in the big cities, 'cause the entire country was going to the bathroom at the same time." While intrigued by her immense public appeal, Strauss found her private pain most compelling. "She and Desi were perfect together, except for the fact that they weren't", he said. "She loved him. He loved her. And yet, they couldn't live together." On camera, Arnaz was an understanding, loving husband. Off-camera, he was an alcoholic and a womanizer. "She knew she couldn't divorce him, because that would let the country down", said Strauss. "That's how powerful that bond was for us. It was like a civic bond." In his novel, Strauss gives Lucy love in the form of an affair, with his own grandfather. "I wanted to give her a love story of her own; that's why I told this story in this way", he said. But that's fiction. The fact: Lucy and Desi did eventually divorce. Both remarried. But most poignantly, Strauss says, if she were asked at the end of her life who was the love of her life, she would have said, "Desi Arnaz. Absolutely." "At the root", said Kate Luckinbill, "they were connected by their souls." She should know; she's their granddaughter. "We had a very special bond", she said. "Your grandparents did remain in love 'til the end of their lives?" asked Axelrod. "Uh-huh. Completely, madly, deeply." Luckinbill is now the head of creative direction at Desilu, the studio founded by her grandparents. Years after "I Love Lucy", Lucille Ball greenlit shows like "Star Trek", "The Untouchables", and "The Twilight Zone." And she is keeper of the "I Love Lucy" flame: "There's a healing quality to that show. That's what I feel I'm here to do, is to remind people of the elixir that they brought the world." Luckinbill is protective of the memory of her grandfather, who died in 1986 at the age of 69, and her grandmother, who died three years later from an aortic aneurysm, at 77. But she also wants to look at them honestly. Axelrod asked, "Better we allow the illusion to move aside and let's deal with the reality?" "Yeah, yeah", Luckinbill said. "And why it's so important not to let people like that die in their 70s from a heart explosion and alcoholism. Because neither of them should've been gone. They died of sadness and trauma, both of them." No Hollywood ending, perhaps, but what Lucy and Desi did give the world still has an extraordinary impact 70 years later. Just ask young Yolanda Glass: "That was, like, the first time I got to see a female being funny and silly and embarrassing. And it was cool! I feel like when I was really little, there was this idea that you have to be polite and quiet as a woman. And when I watched her show, that was the first introduction of, 'You don't have to be quiet. You could be funny. You could be loud. And it was okay.'" "And guess what? America's gonna love it!" said Axelrod. "Right. And they're gonna love it so much, we're gonna be on for decades. And people in my generation, the next generation, and the next generation, are gonna know." See also: For more info: Story produced by Jay Kernis. Editor: Lauren Barnello. See also:
We still love Lucy
cbsnews.com
c73da351b24ec4d3a6bcfbf9c0e8950c

 

 9 /26 

0.6
Joanne Shenandoah, Indigenous singer of majestic lyricism, dies at 64

Joanne Shenandoah, a singer and songwriter who received worldwide acclaim for her music that drew on her heritage as a member of the Oneida Nation and made her one of the country’s most honored and popular Indigenous performers, died Nov. 22 at a hospital in Scottsdale, Arizona. She was 64. The cause was internal bleeding as a result of liver failure, said her husband, Doug George-Kanentiio. She had been hospitalized with a liver infection in 2016 and recovered after several months. When she became ill this year, her husband said doctors at the Mayo Clinic could not determine the cause of her liver disease, but it was not related to alcohol abuse or hepatitis. Shenandoah, whose father was a chief in the Onandaga Nation and whose mother was from the Wolf clan of the Oneida Nation, grew up in Oneida territory in central New York. Surrounded by music as a child, she was given the name Tekaliwhakwah, which means “she sings.” Before launching her career in music, Shenandoah spent about a dozen years in the Washington area, where she had a computer consulting business and found occasional jobs singing for commercials and as a backup vocalist. “I was working very hard and was doing all the things I thought were important in life,” she told the Associated Press in 1997. “One day I was looking out my office window. This huge tree was being cut down, and something clicked: What am I doing with my life here?” In 1989, she released the first of more than a dozen albums, and the next year she moved back to Oneida territory. She sought out elders to learn more about the history and languages of the Oneida people and other groups in the Iroquois Confederacy, which also includes the Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora nations. Shenandoah did not perform traditional Indigenous music but borrowed certain melodic and rhythmic motifs from it as she wrote original songs, sometimes in English and often in Mohawk or other Iroquois languages. “In the Iroquois way,” she said in 2013, “music is a healing force, and the vibration of music lifts the spirit.” Shenandoah, who played guitar, piano, flute, cello and other instruments, gave as many as 200 concerts a year, often with her sister and daughter as backup vocalists. International sales of her recordings were in the millions. She generally used modern instrumentation in her music and sometimes had an electronic, techno sound pulsing beneath her ethereal, soaring voice. Her songs reflected her interests in nature, women’s lives and Iroquois culture. “In all of her music, her voice is always very much an expression of what the Iroquois refer to as ‘the good mind,’ ” Christopher Vecsey, a scholar of Native American studies at New York’s Colgate University, told NPR in 2000. “Her voice never stretches,” he added. “It never goes to edges. It’s always right in the center, beautifully calm, and I think that voice really expresses the message as much as the words express the message.” Shenandoah quickly gained a following that spread far beyond the world of Native American music. Her songs were featured in the 1990s television series “Northern Exposure,” she performed several times at the White House and at inaugural events for presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. In 1994, Shenandoah sang before a crowd of several hundred thousand at the 25th anniversary of the Woodstock music festival in New York. During the 1990s, she wrote a song with Neil Young and Brian Kirkpatrick, “Treaty,” which addresses the treatment of Native groups by federal authorities: “You can drain all the oceans / and fill them with tears / You will never remove me / I’ll always be here.” Shenandoah sang for the Dalai Lama and South African leader Nelson Mandela, and in 2012 she appeared at the Vatican to honor the canonization of Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint. She shared the stage with such varied performers as Waylon Jennings, Pete Seeger, Richie Havens, John Denver, Willie Nelson, Rita Coolidge and Robbie Robertson – the latter two of whom have Indigenous ancestry. Shenandoah was nominated for several Grammy Awards and sang two of her songs on the 2005 album “Sacred Ground: A Tribute to Mother Earth,” which won a Grammy for best Native American Music album. (The category no longer exists.) She also received 14 Native American Music Awards, more than any other artist. “Joanne is to contemporary Native American music what Aretha Franklin, Etta James, or Billie Holiday are to their respective genres,” Mohawk musician Ed Koban told Native News Online. Joanne Lynn Shenandoah was born June 23, 1957, in Syracuse, N.Y., and grew up nearby in Oneida territory. One of her ancestors was an Oneida chief known as Shenandoah (there are several spellings of his name), who was a close associate of George Washington and helped to feed his troops during the Revolutionary War. Her father was an ironworker who played jazz guitar. Her mother had a Native crafts business and enjoyed singing. As a girl, Shenandoah often made music with her family at home. “What amazed me when she was young, she could just pick up any instrument and start playing it,” her mother said in 1997. “It was just born in her.” She attended Andrews University in Michigan and Montgomery Community College in Maryland. In the 1990s, Shenandoah and George-Kanentiio, her husband, wrote “Skywoman: Legends of the Iroquois,” a book for young people about Iroquois history and culture. She later composed a work of the same name for symphony orchestra and voice. In addition to her music, Shenandoah had an acting role in the 2006 horror film “The Last Winter,” set in the Arctic. She was an activist for Native rights and was often at odds with leaders of the Oneida Nation. During the Obama administration, she was the co-chair, with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, of the Task Force on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence. Her most recent album, “Shenandoah Country” (2020), included songs about violence toward women. Shenandoah’s marriage to Edward Smith ended in divorce. Survivors include her husband of 30 years, George-Kanentiio, a journalist and commentator on Native affairs of Oneida Castle, New York; a daughter from her first marriage, Leah Shenandoah of Oneida Castle; four sisters; and a grandson. Shenandoah and her husband established a foundation that is the repository of the world’s largest collection of recorded Iroquois music. “I really believe that a lot of the music I write and sing is completely ancestrally inspired,” Shenandoah said in 1997. “If I didn’t live here on our ancestral homeland, I truly believe it wouldn’t have come out the same.” Success. Please wait for the page to reload. If the page does not reload within 5 seconds, please refresh the page. Enter your email and password to access comments. Forgot Password? Don't have a Talk profile? Create one. Invalid username/password. Please check your email to confirm and complete your registration. Create a commenting profile by providing an email address, password and display name. You will receive an email to complete the registration. Please note the display name will appear on screen when you participate. Already registered? Log in to join the discussion. Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or login to participate in the conversation. Here’s why. Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code. Send questions/comments to the editors. « Previous

 

 10 /26 

0.3
10 Dramatic Courtroom Dramas That Will Have You Gripped

Classics never get old and this movie is a perfect example. Some law students, lawyers and jury consultants are said to study it to better understand the psychology of jurors. Among many other things, this film is a great cinematic exploration of human psychology. In the story, a young boy is on trial for the alleged murder of his father. The jury reaches its conclusion quickly, until juror 8, a man of principle, demands an in-depth deliberation. Originally broadcast in 1954 as a television play, written by Reginald Rose, it was adapted for a film, directed by Sidney Lumet, in 1957. One of the best courtroom dramas ever made. The screenplay is based on Harper Lee's 1960 Pulitzer Prize–winning novel of the same name. Defense lawyer, Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck), represents Tom Robinson, a Black man who has been accused of raping a young white woman. In this famous scene, he asks the members of the jury to reach a verdict based on the evidence presented, not on prejudice against Black people in 1930's America. The sharp, inspirational speech by attorney Finch has no doubt encouraged many to go to law school, and countless more to reject racism and discrimination. The legal drama about the court-martial of two U.S. Marines charged with the murder of a colleague and the tribulations of their lawyers as they take on the army establishment. One particular cross-examination scene is ace, and so are Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. Two brothers go on trial for a murder they didn't commit but they can't afford a defence lawyer, so they hire their inexperienced cousin, Vinny, who has just passed his bar exam. A courtroom-comedy-drama, this film has plenty of funny moments thanks in part to its cast; Joe Pesci is excellent as Vinny, and so is Marisa Tomei in an Oscar-winning supporting role as Vinny's girlfriend. Watch out for Tomei taking on an overconfident lawyer. Psychological thriller in which troubled altar boy (Edward Norton) with a personality disorder, convinces hot shot Chicago defence attorney (Richard Gere) to defend him in a murder case. This cross examination by Laura Linney is powerful, though not necessarily realistic; saying "I would stab him 78 times" in front of a judge would likely bring an objection to inappropriate language. But if it were realistic, it would not be so darn dramatic. Fashionable and naive Elle Woods ( Reese Witherspoon), is dumped by her boyfriend but she decides to follow him to law school. While there, she finds her inner confidence and proves that women can be in touch with their feminine side and also be brainy and successful in their careers. In this scene Elle seems unconfident, but once she finds the right line of questioning, she gets an unexpected outcome, better than she was expecting. Underrated legal thriller based on the John Grisham novel of the same name. A widow decides to sue a gun manufacturer on the grounds that the company's gross negligence led to her husband's death. During the trial, a juror on the inside and a woman on the outside will attempt to manipulate the outcome. One particular scene in which a potential juror pretends he wants to get himself excused sets the tone for what is to come. A group of law students and their tough criminal defense professor become involved in a shocking murder plot. Viola Davis stars as Annalise Keating, the heart and soul of the series and a straight talking defense attorney with a no-frills approach to law. Here is Annalise Keating, in some superb cross examination. The acclaimed CBS legal and political drama series about Alicia Florrick, a good wife who resumes her career as a defense attorney when her politician husband lands in prison due to a corruption scandal. The seven seasons television show has plenty of good moments considering there are over 150 episodes. When Alicia is in court, she usually nails it and grabs the audience's full attention. The show offers sharp social commentary on issues such as #MeToo, disinformation, internet trolls, and the Trump administration. The courtroom scenes are sharp and will have you gripped to your seat.

 

 11 /26 

0.5
FBI: Images Show Dark Truth About Renowned Collector

(Newser) – Amateur archaeologists and collectors have long conducted their own unsanctioned digs at sites around the country, flying under the radar of various laws designed to protect, say, ancient burial grounds of Native Americans. They're called "pothunters", and the ethics are squishy. Now, Vanity Fair explores the life of a man who is the pothunter of all pothunters, the late Don Miller of Indiana. In 2014, the FBI raided his home, which, along with multiple outbuildings, were crammed with an astonishing volume of relics and even human bones that Miller himself had dug up over the preceding decades in the US and abroad. "I stood there and looked around, like, 'You have got to be s-----ing me'", recalls the FBI's Tim Carpenter of his first visit. The collection dwarfed that of even large museums, some of the items so rare that overwhelmed anthropologists at the scene were crying. While the story looks at how Miller obtained his hundreds of thousands of artifacts—and how Carpenter got wind of the collection—the piece also describes never-before-revealed images and home videos made by Miller of his digs. One video shows Miller at a burial cave on Easter Island grinning as he tosses skulls into a bag. Another image shows him lying in a grave. "And in one of the most disturbing shots, a Native American skull cut in half is filled with yellow apples", writes Josh Sanburn. His story also notes that during the FBI seizure at Miller's home, Miller flippantly referred to his collection of bones as a "bunch of dead Indians." Miller, who died before any charges were filed against him, has his share of defenders. But "I want to dispel the notion that Don was a responsible collector", says Carpenter. "He was not. He was a grave robber." (Read the full story.)

 

 12 /26 

0.5
When Is Jodie Whittaker Regenerating on 'Doctor Who'?

It was announced on July 29, 2021 that Jodie Whittaker would be saying goodbye to the role of The Doctor. The actor has portrayed the 13th iteration of the Time Lord since 2018, the first woman to do so, but the character will soon be regenerating to make way for another. Ever since, it has been speculated who will take over the role from Whittaker, and a number of actors have already been named as potential successors, including Olly Alexander, Richard Ayoade, and Lydia West. While it's known she's leaving the role, Whittaker still has a while yet until she officially departs. Showrunner Chris Chibnall announced he was also departing the sci-fi franchise with Whittaker as they had a deal to only make three seasons together. In a statement regarding her departure, Whittaker said: "I cannot thank Chris enough for entrusting me with his incredible stories. "We knew that we wanted to ride this wave side by side, and pass on the baton together. So here we are, weeks away from wrapping on the best job I have ever had." She added: "I don't think I'll ever be able to express what this role has given me. I will carry the Doctor and the lessons I've learnt forever." Whittaker, like her predecessors, is passing on the baton after three seasons and a number of one-off episodes in the role. Russell T. Davis, who was showrunner for both Christopher Eccleston and David Tennant's tenures as The Doctor, will be returning to the franchise after they leave. Whittaker is currently appearing in her final season as The Doctor, which has been given the unique title "Flux" and will end on Sunday, December 5. The first special will air on New Years Day in 2022, while the second is set to be released in Spring 2022. The third special is a feature-length episode that will air in Late 2022 in celebration of the centenary of the iconic franchise. Whittaker's iteration of the Doctor will regenerate in this final special, and it is then that the next actor to portray the character will also be revealed in the role. Whittaker will be joined in the specials by Mandip Gill and John Bishop as Yasmin Khan and Dan Lewis, respectively. Bishop made his debut in "Flux", becoming The Doctor's companion after Bradley Walsh and Tosin Cole departed the show. Walsh will reprise his role as Graham O'Brien in the third special. The finale of "Flux" airs at 8 p.m. EST on BBC America.

 

 13 /26 

0.3
Billie Eilish Changed Her Hair Color Again — And Announced A New Video

For most people, changing hair color is an exciting update that a few friends will notice and pay compliments to… when you’re Billie Eilish, that update is a news story. Or at least, Eilish set the tone for dramatic shifts in her hair back when she flipped the script from dark brunette with green streaks, and went full-on bombshell blonde for a Vogue cover that surprisingly showed off her figure, something she’d sought to avoid up until that point in her career. After that cover broke an Instagram record, racking up one million likes, it became clear that fashion statements from Billie were going to be very impactful. And so a shift back in the brunette direction felt equally shocking when Eilish posted the new look on Instagram this weekend, especially considering all the promo for her Happier Than Ever album cycle was tied to her dramatically blonde, pouty look. Now that Grammy nominations are in place, maybe it felt like the right time to change things up again, as Eilish captioned the first post with her darker hair: “Miss me?” Though the pics are very close up, it looks like her hair might be significantly shorter, too. A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) Billie capped off the weekend by announcing that her “Male Fantasy” video would drop tomorrow morning, also noting that it was directed and edited by her. Take a look at the clip below and be on the lookout for that full video tomorrow. A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish)

 

 14 /26 

0.2
In Ghana, I’ve been embraced by a community welcoming me home

My heart has crossed this ocean but there is no Vibranium here. No mythical supernatural people of coal to caramel skin. I find here no sign of the fictional Hollywood African nation of Wakanda that spoke to that longing in the hearts of African Americans in the movie “Black Panther,” with visions of hope and serendipity. No utopia — Ghana. No grandiose illusions — pure Ghana, population 31.98 million. And yet, there is something here. Something there is, embodied in the bended emerald branches of coconut trees, that speaks to me. Something about the way the white foam waves crash upon these ancestral shores on this side of the Atlantic Ocean in this Gold Coast nation, where W.E.B. DuBois lies buried. Something that soothes my Black soul, relieves my searing double consciousness like water extinguishing a flame. There is something about standing here between yesterday and tomorrow — in between the time I can recall of the best in Black America and my current ingestion of the scenes of daily life that pass before my eyes and leave me with deep reflections of how far we’ve come since slavery, and also with plain glaring truths about what we as Black folks inarguably lost somewhere along the journey. There is something here — vibrant, prideful, dignified, unbroken. It is apparent, even far beyond the white stone slave castle at Cape Coast, where poverty and the pulse of this capital city converge as one. It moves circumspectly with a sense of purpose and precision that almost defies description. It glares like the countless glossy, larger-than-life poster images of grinning local preachers peddling hope in neighborhoods across the Greater Accra Region, where signs of struggle glare like the white mannequins adorned in bright-colored African dresses for sale. In communities dotted with shops and houses, some made of tin and wood. It is clear that life here for many is hard, and a living to be eked out by sweat, ingenuity and enterprise — by the labor of hands and feet in relentless heat, and by one’s willingness to rise up early in the morn. And yet, they arise. They dot the landscape, their faces filled with resilience and pride that grace the eyes like fine kente cloth — born centuries ago of the Ashanti and Ewe people. There is something about this place that captivates my heart, soul and mind… It flows through crowded, sand- and crater-laden, unpaved streets with no curbs, lined with humble shops of locals selling coconuts and watermelons, which they carve with sharp machetes with a surgeon’s precision, or other indigenous fruits, bottled water, juice, wiper blades, just about anything imaginable. It rises above the morning-to-evening buzz of traffic — of boisterous Tro Tros — the privately-owned, often rickety, open air mini-vans where rambunctious young men beckon for fares and swerve to welcome riders aboard. It rises above the fray of unapologetic taxi and Uber drivers, and the innumerable motorcyclists who zip in between cars, pedestrians and marching merchants who hawk their wares in the roadway market’s hustle and flow to idling motorists and their passengers. It drifts like the scent of scented mosquito coils drifting on a humid breeze, as I tap my computer keyboard, marshmallow clouds looming overhead in a baby-blue sky. There is something here that stirs within me generations of tears amid a palpable sense of reconnection to my shackled ancestors who made their journey to the other side long ago in the Middle Passage to American slavery. Yes, my heart has crossed this ocean. I am a son come home, in some ways, to reconcile my present and future with my past. Aboard a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, not in the hull of a slave ship. By air, rather than by sea. Of my own free will. Not in chains. Driven toward home, rather than taken away. And yet, my heart — like my ancestor’s — yearning to again taste freedom. Having arrived in Ghana little more than a week ago, I am both a sojourner and intimate observer, listening, tasting, absorbing the culture, from language to splendid Ghanaian jollof rice, plantains and Red Red (a stew) sprinkled with gari, to neighborhoods far beyond the tourist’s fare. And it has become clear to me that even as a Black man in an African nation I stick out as an American — a detectable outsider even among my kinsmen on my ancestors’ native land. I am greeted warmly by most. But side-eyed by some. I feel friendliness in some places and spaces as I mill about. Tepidness in others. Could it be that I am not welcome in this land either? “At least,” I think to myself, “this has nothing to do with my race.” And yet, finding discrimination on this side would cut to the bone. It is too soon to draw conclusions. But this much I already know: I have been embraced by a community, by brothers and sisters whom I had never seen, but who have welcomed me home as a long-lost son. My heart has crossed this ocean. And I must continue this journey. But I have already discovered something here much more precious than Vibranium. #justiceforJelaniDay John Fountain is a Fulbright Scholar in Ghana. This is his first in a series of dispatches from that country. Send letters to letters@suntimes.com.

 

 15 /26 

2.8
Marcus Lamb's death highlights Christian media's vaccine problem

Marcus Lamb, who made an anti-vax stance his crusade, died Thursday after being hospitalized for Covid-19. Lamb, a popular Christian televangelist who founded Daystar Television in 1997, touted alternative remedies over vaccines to his viewers. At least five conservative media personalities who promoted vaccine skepticism have died of Covid-19. "The Covid pandemic has been very difficult for churches", Bob Smietana, national writer at Religion News Service, said on "Reliable Sources" Sunday. "It shut them down. it has become seen as an attack on religion." Lamb felt he was preaching the truth about vaccines — claiming they were part of a conspiracy by Big Pharma, the media and the government, and that alternative medicine was a better option. CNN's chief media correspondent Brian Stelter said there's a "toxic merger" of right-wing politics and some churches. "They're preaching the gospel of Donald Trump and vaccine denialism", Stelter said. Despite Lamb's death, his followers are unlikely to believe in vaccines' effectiveness and will continue to view the pandemic through the lens of spiritual warfare in which Lamb was attacked for spreading the truth about Covid-19, Smietana said. "His folks won't stop with their promotion of vaccine skepticism and alternative treatments for Covid because they see that as continuing the good fight", Smietana said. Christian media outlets, which often don't get much coverage from major news sources, sometimes predict trends before they go mainstream. "They tapped into the critical race theory debates long before it became popular in the regular media", Smietana said.

 

 16 /26 

0.5
Andria Rose Is Bound To Blow Up, & These Lyrics Showcase Her Talent

Expect "In the Abstract" to remain stuck in your head. One of the many ways to communicate one’s feelings and emotions is through songwriting. For Latinx singer Andria Rose, this rings especially true on her most recent album release, Telenovela. Specializing in jazzy, psychedelic vocals, the unique album is making headway, nabbing buzzy features in Billboard’s Fresh Picks and Spotify’s trending playlists like Fresh Finds Latin and Latin Indie Rising. Still, one track is sure to remain stuck in your head: “In the Abstract.” The second track on the album holds a lot of meaning for Rose. And when you read the lyrics, you too can understand the meaning behind musician Andria Rose’s “In the Abstract” lyrics. In the introspective single, the San Antonio artist sings, “It doesn’t seem like I’ll find what I’m looking for cause I’m needing so much more, so much more than this.” The moody lyrics mesh well with the song’s hazy, low-fi vibe, and Rose tells Elite Daily she wrote the song when she was feeling stagnant in her life. “I wrote (‘In the Abstract’) when I was in a strange spot in my life,” she says. “My mind was everywhere and never seemed quite clear. I suppose being who I am, I constantly feel like I should be doing more, accomplishing more, instead of taking a moment to appreciate how far I’ve come and all I’ve been able to do for myself.” Rose highlights the pressure she put on herself when she sings, “Running circles in the abstract of my own mind,” which can be relatable to all who are trying to figure life out. Watch Andria Rose’s “In the Abstract” music video below. Check out the “In the Abstract” lyrics. [Intro] You give me life Running circles in the abstract of My own mind The timing is divine [Chorus] You give me life Running circle in the abstract of The sublime The timing is all mine [Verse 1] Waiting patiently For somebody to give me Some piece of mind But it doesn’t seem like I’ll find What I’m looking for cause I’m needing so much more So much more than this [Chorus] You give me life Running circle in the abstract of My own mind The timing is divine You give me life Running circle in the abstract of The sublime The timing is all mind [Verse 2] Baby why don’t you Come clean Cause everything you do is like a mystery [Chorus] You give me life Running circles in the abstract of My own mind The timing is divine You give me life Running circles in the abstract of The sublime The timing is all mine [Verse 3] You give me life (baby you) Running circles in the abstract of (give me life) My own mind (running circles) The timing is divine (in the abstract) You give me life (baby you) Running circles in the abstract of (give me life) The sublime (running circles) The timing is all mine (and it’s divine) [Verse 4] X2 Oh, babe, I keep it moving I keep it moving And I keep it moving [Chorus] You give me life Running circles in the abstract of My own mind And the timing is divine You give me life Running circles in the abstract of The sublime The timing is all mine Andria Rose’s Telenovela is available to stream below.

 

 17 /26 

0.2
10 Films You Probably Forgot Were Christmas Movies—and Where to Watch Them

The problem with watching the same films year in, year out is that it can film samey. Sometimes, you just want something new, something that you may not have considered yet to be a Christmas movie. Of course, everyone's definition of what exactly Christmas movies are differs from person to person, explaining how we manage to have the " is Die Hard a Christmas movie " argument every single year. For some, it needs to have a general Christmassy feeling of festive cheer, while for others a few snowflakes are enough to turn something into a seasonal classic. For this article, we are taking the most traditional definition of a Christmas film. Every film on this list has at least one scene set at Christmas. And while not every movie goes full tinsel, mistletoe and Santa in his sleigh, and all might not leave viewers with big Christmassy feelings, all of them could find a place in your December rotation. Gotham is not really a place that makes you think of festive cheer, and Tim Burton makes the most of the contrast between the darkness of Gotham and the lightness of Christmas in his second Batman movie. The whole film is set at Christmas, with Gotham covered in snow and the streets decked out with trees, lights and candy colors. A tree-lighting ceremony is even a major plot point. Just do not expect The Penguin's heart to grow three sizes by the end. Where to watch: HBO Max Where to watch: The Roku Channel and IMDb TV Where to watch: Starz Where to watch: FuboTV and AMC+ Where to watch: HBO Max and Peacock Where to watch: HBO Max Where to watch: Both films on HBO Max Where to watch: Hulu, Paramount+ and Epix The 80s comedy classic starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy takes places over Christmas to New Year, with Aykroyd even wearing one of the rattiest Santa costumes ever committed to the screen in one key scene. Where to watch: Starz Where to watch: Disney+

 

 18 /26 

0.6
Miami Design District Offers Creative Exhibits Through Winter 2022

As a native Miamian I enjoy the excitement and art exhibits of Art Basel, but I’m happy when the crowds are gone. I’m even more delighted that art programming will remain at the Miami Design District through the winter, ranging from pop-up galleries to fashion, design and tech moments & collabs. Many of these programs are free and/or open to the public. The “Design District” comes from the name given in the 1980s to a section of Miami's “Old Florida” Buena Vista neighborhood, a dozen streets north of Wynwood. By the 1990s, this precinct of furniture and home-décor showrooms and warehouses had grown seedy. Today the Design District is ultra-high end — Miami’s version of Rodeo Drive, plus art and an international vibe — with modern architecture and a few classic art-deco buildings, upscale interior design stores and art galleries and museums. Luxury fashion and jewelry boutiques, cafes and celebrity-chef restaurants draw a sophisticated, glam crowd. Public art is set within the area, on buildings including parking garages, in sculptures murals, pop-ups and iconic creations including the Fly’s Eye Dome, a geodesic dome designed by inventor Buckminster Fuller. 2021 Annual Design Commission: Tomorrow Land The Miami Design District unveiled Tomorrow Land, a physical and virtual site-specific installation created by Studio Proba and Enjoy the Weather for the neighborhood’s Annual Design Commission 2021. Tomorrow Land features a series of playfully designed sculptures, seating, and ornamentation, created by Studio Proba in her signature style. In addition to the physical components woven throughout the neighborhood, the installation boasts an interactive, virtual game created by Enjoy the Weather. A dedicated app built around AR technology and proximity beacons which allow visitors to “collect” and digitally customize Studio Proba’s shapes and place their own custom totems throughout the neighborhood—and beyond—for other participants to discover and play with. Dates: November 2021 - May 2022 Location: Miami Design District as well as the entrance of Design Miami/ in Pride Park Louis Vuitton Objets Nomades Collection Louis Vuitton’s Objets Nomades Collection celebrates the Maison’s long-tradition of exceptional craftsmanship and heritage through travel-inspired objects that reflect the collaborative, contemporary visions of a diverse group of internationally-renowned designers. From a hammock to a foldable stool, an armchair to a room screen, each limited-edition object transcends the creative boundaries of design, showcasing the Maison’s attention to complex craftsmanship and artistic innovation. This December, Louis Vuitton has expanded its Objets Nomades collection by transforming its Miami Design District stores into an immersive Objets Nomades installation, highlighting new pieces for 2021, including Merengue and Aguacate by the Campana Brothers, Cosmic Table by Raw Edges and a Petal Chair by Marcel Wanders. The men’s store façade is based on the Marcel Wanders Studio Objets Nomades Diamond Screen, where Marcel reinterprets Louis Vuitton’s historic Monogram motif and the canework that once adorned LV trunks. The color and sensationalism of the pattern adapted to the new men’s store façade screen pays homage to Miami Modernist architectural style. The Women's store’s façade is temporarily wrapped in a burst of woven colors, patterned after a new Objet Nomade by the Campana Brothers. Inside, Patricia Urquiola has curated an enveloping exhibition of the universe of Objets Nomades, a journey through the artistic perspectives of all the Objets Nomades collaborators and an exceptional survey of the Maison’s heritage and savoir-faire. Tod’s Mosaic Collection Tod’s, the iconic Italian brand known for timeless elegance and understated luxury, celebrates its MOSAIC Collection. Tod’s limited edition collection is comprised of shopping totes and pouches, all made using an upcycled process. With a focus on sustainability, the MOSAIC Collection gives new life to materials that would otherwise remain unused, and transforms them into timeless, sustainable objects. Tod’s has joined forces with American contemporary artist Willie Cole, who is known for creating three-dimensional art pieces from existing materials, to create unique sculptures made from recycled Tod’s leather and unused production materials. ARTCYCLING is a creative project based on the same values as Tod's MOSAIC Collection and is brought to life by Willie Cole in collaboration with Tod's artisans. on view at the Tod’s Miami Design District boutique through December 6th. Miami Design District Program Of Galleries And Cultural Exhibitions

 

 19 /26 

0.3
Music critics mock Kenny G's 'safe sax.' But a new documentary will change how you see him

The 65-year-old saxophone player has been called the best-selling instrumentalist of all time, someone whose songs have formed the sonic backdrop of so many weddings, shopping mall and dental office visits that one music critic said he's "part of the musical furniture of American culture." The Jazz Police -- fans and critics who are self-appointed enforcers of jazz purity -- have called Kenny G's music "safe sax" and compared it to takeout Chinese food ("an hour later you're hungry again"). Jazz guitarist Pat Metheny has dismissed Kenny G's style as " lame-ass, jive, pseudo bluesy out-of-tune, noodling." But a new documentary film by Penny Lane may lead some of Kenny G's critics to reconsider. " Listening to Kenny G ", which premiered this week on HBO Max, offers surprising glimpses into the songs and private life of the skinny, White guy who became the face -- and hair -- of smooth jazz. The film suggests that Kenny G, who just released his first album in six years, is not only unappreciated but a groundbreaking artist who pursues perfection and innovation in his own sweet way. The documentary also asks bigger questions outside of music. It explores racial prejudice and the art vs. commerce debate, and offers some lessons on what it takes for someone to be successful in any field. What comes through is that Kenny G probably would have been successful at whatever he chose to do. He is relentless striver -- practicing his sax at least three hours each day -- with a compulsive need to get better at everything, even if it's just baking an apple pie in his opulent kitchen. Many critics have disparaged his music Kenny G's devotion to his craft, though, will probably not impress his critics. His music has been described as bland and soporific -- like an aural hit of Ambien. It has furnished many Internet memes, and shows like "Saturday Night Live" and "South Park" have made fun of his "Snooze Jazz." Some of the funniest scenes in the documentary come when jazz critics are asked to appraise Kenny G's music. Many squirm like toddlers at the dentist, with looks of discomfort across their faces as Kenny G standards like "Songbird" play in the background. When Ben Ratliff, a well known jazz and pop music critic, was asked what he thought of Kenny G's music, he struggled to give an assessment. "I'm sure I heard of a lot of Kenny G's music -- while waiting for something", Ratcliff says, referring to the piped-in music he hears in stores or during visits to his bank. Another critic, though, cited Kenny G's massive popularity -- he has sold at least 75 million records -- as a form of defense. "It can't simply be that millions of people are just stupid and Pat Metheny is the smart one", says Jason King, a musician and scholar at New York University. The center of the documentary, though, is Kenny G himself. His canny deflections of his detractors take the film in unexpected directions. Kenny G refrains from labeling his own music. Is it jazz, pop? You tell me, he says. He also dismisses the notion that he deliberately set out to create jazz Muzak that would appeal to the masses. "These are songs from my heart", he says. "This is just the way I hear it. They [critics] think I just decided to play these songs because I knew they would sell well. If only I was that smart." Even so, he created a signature sound But the film makes clear, as it traces his rise in the musical world, that Kenny G is a lot smarter than people realize. He was born Kenneth Bruce Gorelick in Seattle, Washington, a quiet Jewish kid who was expected to take over his father's plumbing business one day. But young Kenny became enthralled by the silky music of jazz saxophonist Grover Washington Jr., whose hits like "Just The Two of Us" heralded the 1980s rise of the smooth jazz genre. Kenny G's high school music teacher recalls him as a shy kid with no girlfriend who was "super, super smart." The teacher tells a funny story about Kenny G stealing the show during one of his first live gigs by holding a prolonged note -- a signature stage move that would be recognizable to any of his fans today. Some of the best scenes show Kenny G's cockiness. He's also an outstanding golfer as well as a pilot and a successful investor. "That's a hard lick and I just played it really well", he says with a self-satisfied smile after an impressive practice run on his soprano sax. The film also does a good job explaining why some jazz critics despise him. Many say his music is not jazz. Jazz, they say, is about improvisation and vigorous interplay between musicians who are testing musical boundaries. Those qualities don't describe Kenny G's music. But even some of his critics concede that Kenny G created a new type of instrumental music with massive hits like "Songbird" and "Silhouette." What's inarguable is that he has a distinctive sound that's sold millions of records. How many musicians can claim that? "I don't think a lot of people could say they created a new sound, but I did", he says. Some dismiss that sound as "easy listening", but Kenny G seems nonplussed by the label. "When you hear the words, 'easy listening', it almost sounds bad", he says. "Well, I don't see anything wrong with something that's easy to listen to." His music sparks debate about what is authentic jazz Jazz purists criticize Kenny G because they don't think his music reflects any exceptional jazz chops or innovation. They also complain that he's earned so many millions from his music while many jazz musicians who are much more skilled toil in relative obscurity. As the film makes clear, the debate over what constitutes true jazz is as old as jazz itself. Louis Armstrong is widely seen as the greatest jazz musician of all time for his virtuoso trumpet playing and singing. But is "What a Wonderful World", one of his biggest hits, jazz? And if not, does it tarnish his legacy? Miles Davis, another jazz legend, was accused of selling out when he went electric on his album "Bitches Brew", which helped launch jazz fusion music in the 1970s. Yet no one would claim Davis isn't an authentic jazz artist. Besides, there is another purpose that jazz, and all music, serves. Music offers people an escape, a way to feel good. Some of the most moving passages in the documentary show Kenny G's wide appeal. His fans come in all races, age groups and nationalities (he's huge in China). The film depicts them all blissfully nodding along to his music with the same contented look. The great jazz drummer Art Blakely once said that "jazz washes away the dust of everyday life." Kenny G's music may not fit the classical definition of jazz. And it may put some listeners to sleep. But maybe we shouldn't underestimate a musician who can wash away the dust of everyday life for many listeners who are worn down by living in an increasingly divided world. If we go by that standard, Kenny G just might be a maestro.

 

 20 /26 

0.5
There is an environmental impact each time you hit 'buy now'. Here's an alternative

Buying stuff is a part of America's DNA. It's a tradition that really took off near the end of World War II, when the economy was thriving and the market exploded with products Americans didn't even know they wanted. And even in an economy rocked by a pandemic, buying is on track to exceed 2020 levels this holiday season. The result of all that spending means consumption drives 70% of our country's GDP, but it's also driving very real environmental issues. Let's break down what the environmental cost can be, and whether it's possible to limit the damage. The true environmental cost of a product can't be summed up just by looking at the physical material. You have to take into account the entire system in place that brings that product to you, from manufacturing to packaging to shipping and transportation. "You name [an environmental problem], consumerism drives it", says journalist J.B. MacKinnon, who wrote The Day the World Stops Shopping, How Ending Consumerism Saves the Environment and Ourselves. Mackinnon cites deforestation, toxic pollution, climate change, and the extinction of species as just a few of the myriad problems tied to our consumption. And, he adds, the environmental impact of consumer culture can take shape in surprising ways. Mackinnon gives the example of how endangered North Atlantic right whales are killed after being struck by cargo ships carrying consumer goods. "One whale conservationist said to me, every time you hit that 'buy now' button on Amazon, you're helping power up the ships that are running down endangered whales off the east coast of the United States", Mackinnon said. The reality is that consumer goods are integral to the economy, but it is possible for companies to continue to sell products without exacerbating to the cycle of overproduction and overconsumption, Mackinnon says. He says apparel brands like Levi's and Patagonia have adopted more sustainable business models. "Both of those companies are moving towards models where they will be making the sale of new products a smaller part of their model and the sale of recouping and reselling secondhand their own products a larger part of their model, as well as the repair and maintenance and alteration of their products as part of their income stream as well." By implementing a system to repair, refurbish, and resell products for customers, these companies are able to extend the longevity of their goods, while simultaneously drawing in revenue to keep the economy going. Independent journalist Annaliese Griffin made it her personal mission to only to buy secondhand gifts, writing about the commitment in a recent New York Times op-ed titled How To Buy Nothing New This Holiday Season. For Griffin, buying the hottest new thing for her family felt predictable and unsatisfying. "To not have that sort of element of surprise and delight just felt like it was counter to the whole point of getting gifts", she said. This does not mean Griffin intends to shortchange her family this holiday season. Rather, she says that the practice has resulted in more thoughtful and meaningful gifts for her family. She and her husband regularly peruse the local thrift shop, keeping an eye out for something that resonates in some way as a special token of affection. Griffin also recommends online resale sites, like Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace, as great places to find people's relinquished treasures. Going the secondhand route can also greatly reduce the carbon footprint of your seasonal shopping haul, since these items typically don't need to travel far to get to you. And if you need any more inspiration, Griffin also notes that buying secondhand gifts can help keep the holidays on budget.

 

 21 /26 

0.2
Automatic Zen Garden? This Connected Kinetic Sand Table Is Modern Relaxation

There might not be another product with a bigger disconnect between how mundane it sounds when described and how cool it actually is when in use than the HoMedics Drift kinetic sand table. The basic premise is that a small metal ball rolls around in the sand to create patterns. The first moment the pattern being created emerges in the sand, however, there is an aha moment that feels a little bit like seeing a shooting star in the night sky. It's like seeing a magic trick performed in slow motion, but still not understanding how it was accomplished. Instead of manually raking a Zen garden of rocks or sand, Drift does the work automatically. The passive wellness device connects to a mobile device over Bluetooth and can download different patterns. Using it feels like being able to print a design in sand. I was first exposed to the idea of a kinetic sand table through a "Dope Tech" video from YouTuber MKBHD. He had a large and very expensive version. The HoMedics Drift is a smaller and more affordable option that may be able to find a place in the living room, bedroom or small business. Pros: Cons: Out of the box, there is some setup required for Drift, but it's minimal. Sand needs to be poured into the bowl-like base before adding the metal ball and setting the glass lid on top. After the device is set up and plugged into power, it needs to be connected to its mobile app, which is now available for iOS. (The Android version is coming soon.) On first powering up, Drift started creating a clean circular pattern. It was a mesmerizing display, and it wasn't even doing anything more difficult than rolling the ball in circles, expanding out from the center. (For those curious, a magnet under the surface pulls the ball through the sand.) The Drift mobile app is the main point of control over the device and connects to your phone over Bluetooth. The app allows you to choose the sand patterns and the light color around the edge of the sand table. You can also control the speed with which the patterns are created and the brightness of the light—and whether the light "breathes" (pulses). To get the metal ball rolling, you simply need to select a pattern and then tap play. Once it's completed, the design stays until another one is chosen. There's also a playlist feature where the sand table will start on a new design as soon as it finishes. This allows it to be moving and creating continually without any direct supervision. Drift comes in 16-inch and 21-inch diameter versions. Even the 16-inch white sand table I tried is quite large. You'll need to have a specific place for it to reside. Another consideration for its placement is the power cable running out of its backside. As cool as it might be in the center of a room, it's just not practical with a thick power cable running across the floor. I put Drift next to a record player, and it paired nicely with this old way of listening to music. At first, I set Drift's light to pulse and change colors every 60 seconds. The novelty of that lighting combination wore off fast, but I did find that changing the lighting color and hue does have a real effect on how the patterns look and the feelings they produce. After some time, I found myself gravitating toward a warm light hue for most uses. At night, the Drift can function as an accent light. It's not quite bright enough to be a lamp for a whole room, not even a bedroom, but it does cast a glow in larger spaces. Within the first day of use, I had tapped play on close to a dozen designs. It's addicting to watch the little sphere roll around and make intricate patterns come to life. HoMedics positions the device as one for wellness. Watching it is supposed to promote mindfulness and a calming feeling. I can see how Drift could do that for some people. For me, it was much less about a calming presence and more about a neat piece of decoration. It's modern and simple enough to blend in, but with its light, it can be as attention-grabbing as you want it to be. I had no problem running the device day after day. I'm not sure it will break down eventually over extended use, but for now, that little ball keeps plowing through the sand. It's quite enough to run all day long. Unless the room is dead silent, I can't hear it creating a pattern. When the room is completely quiet, my daughter likened the little bit of sound it does make to that of light rain. It's completely personal whether this noise level is acceptable at night in a bedroom. While I have yet to run out of fresh patterns for the Drift to make, there isn't an infinite amount. I currently count 51 designs available. I think that number is perfectly fine. It would be nice if more were made available in the app in the future, and the company says additional will come, but even if that never happens I think people will be satisfied by the amount of variation currently available. It should be noted that there isn't a way to create custom sand designs yet. I'm not sure whether I would want to spend the time creating a custom pattern even if the feature were available. Still it seems it would be natural to be able to manipulate the sand from your phone one day. In some sense, the HoMedics Drift does nothing. It's a blank page that keeps changing. On the other hand, the device offers plenty of reminders of some basic philosophies: Attention to detail produces great results, and steady progress can lead to accomplishing a big goal. I wasn't expecting to be so impressed with this kinetic sand table from HoMedics, but I have been pleasantly surprised. I suspect that as long as you don't put a weight of expectations on it, you'll likely be plenty happy and amazed with it, as well. Buy at HoMedics from $349.99.

 

 22 /26 

0.1
False Nostalgia

If you visit Hagley Park in the West Midlands of England and make it to the big 18th century house of the Lyttelton family, walk another half-mile to the east and you'll come upon an exotic and impressive sight once you clear the trees. In front of you is what seems like the ruins of a Gothic castle. There are four corner towers, but only one is still standing, complete with battlements and an intersecting stair turret. The others are reduced to one or two stories and the wall connecting them has collapsed. Just two remaining windows impress the spectator with their tall Gothic arches. Below them is a pointed doorway and above it three shield reliefs. You stand there in awe, lost in thought. It is a place of history and memory. You start thinking about the ancient experiences of which this place could speak, and you wonder what spectacular building once stood here. The answer is none. The ruin was constructed just like this in the mid–18th century. The purpose was to give the impression that this was a place of wonder where a magnificent castle had once been until time, nature, and a few heroic (or barbaric) acts reduced it to a state of decay. It is a selective, artificial version of history—very much like the politics of nostalgia that are in vogue today. They tap into a powerful sentiment, a widespread yearning for the good old days. When asked if life in their country is better or worse today than 50 years ago, 31 percent of the British, 41 percent of Americans, and 46 percent of the French say that it is worse. Nostalgia is not new. The mock castle of Hagley Park was not extraordinary back in its day. Building ruins from scratch—"ruin follies"—was at the height of fashion for the European aristocracy in the 18th century. They built shattered castles and crumbling abbeys to commemorate their real or imagined past. In 1836, Edward Hussey III of Scotney Castle in Kent improved his old house by smashing it and turning it into a ruin that made for a nice view from his new house. In the late 18th century, another aristocrat built an extravagant six-story tower in Désert de Retz in France, made to look like the remaining column of a colossal temple. Right beside it he built a ruined Gothic chapel. The ruin craze was part of a broader reaction against the Enlightenment and its ideals of reason and progress. The reaction came to be called Romanticism. It glorified nature, nation, and history and turned the nostalgic desire for childhood and home country from pathology to movement. Sometimes it was not a rejection of modernity but a way to create a continuity that made it easier to live with change, as industrialization and urbanization quickly changed living conditions. "This acute awareness of tradition is a modern phenomenon that reflects a desire for custom and routine in a world characterized by constant change and innovation", wrote the architect and writer Witold Rybczynski in 1986. The term nostalgia was coined by the Swiss doctor Johannes Hofer in 1688. It was his word for the sad, obsessive desire of students, servants, and soldiers in foreign lands to return to their home. In The Future of Nostalgia, comparative literature scholar Svetlana Boym points to the curious fact that, by the end of the 18th century, intellectuals from different national traditions began to claim they had a special term for bittersweet homesickness that did not exist in any other language. Germans had heimweh, French people had maladie du pays, Russians had toska, and Polish people had tesknota. Other emerging nations also claimed that only they, because of their unique national identity, knew the true meaning of the sad, beautiful welling-up of longing. Boym "is struck by the fact that all these untranslatable words are in fact synonyms; and all share the desire for untranslatability, the longing for uniqueness." This was the era when governments and intellectuals began to construct national identities, especially to resist occupation during the Napoleonic Wars and to rebuild afterward. The folk songs they praised as a pure expression of the people's traditional sentiments were rewritten with new lyrics because the old ones were just a little bit too authentic—far too vulgar and not sufficiently patriotic. Authorities also created national languages, often by systematizing a local dialect and enforcing it on everybody through the education system. Linguistic boundaries became rigid, and many oral traditions perished. In the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, which lasted until 1806, only one-quarter of the population spoke German. Even in Prussia, which did the most to encourage poets and writers to create a common German identity to resist Napoleon, German was just one of six major languages. At the 1815 Congress of Vienna, Prussia was registered as a "Slav kingdom", and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel talked of Brandenburg and Mecklenburg as "Germanized Slavs." In his book The Myth of Nations, the historian Patrick J. Geary claimed that even in a country like France, with centuries-old national boundaries and long linguistic traditions, not many more than half spoke French as their native language in 1900. Others spoke different Romance languages and dialects, and in some areas Celtic and Germanic languages. Just as the aristocrats built fake ruins, kings and poets were now erecting artificial ethnicities and nations. Some did it out of love for the homeland, but some also saw its potential as a cement for ideological collectivism. Yet although such ruins and ethnicities are artificial, our feelings for them are real. Evolutionary psychology has revealed that it only takes trivial -similarities between people to create strong bonds with strangers. So it's not strange that an idea of a common history and destiny unites people easily. And while the history of ethnic nationalism is, as former U.S. diplomat Dan Fried has pointed out, like cheap alcohol—first it makes you drunk, then it makes you blind, then it kills you—civic forms of nationalism have inspired fights for freedom and inclusion of immigrants and minority groups too. Nostalgia is a natural, even important, state of mind, according to psychologists. Anchoring our identity in something enduring helps us when all that is solid seems to be melting into air. Everything changes, but we need a sense of stability and predictability. When things change too fast, we lose our sense of control. This is probably why a yearning for the past is especially likely when we experience rapid transitions, like maturing into adulthood, aging into retirement, dislocation, migration, or rapid technological advancement. People going through rough times can be helped by remembering better days in the past. For dementia sufferers, nostalgia can help establish some sense of personal continuity. The best way to deal with it is not leeches or opium (or execution, which a Russian general threatened nostalgic soldiers with during the War of the Polish Succession in 1733). It is a glass of wine, the favorite music from your teens, and the family photo album. As James Madison University religion professor Alan Jay Levinovitz explains, it is important to make a distinction between three sorts of nostalgia: personal, historical, and collective. Personal nostalgia is made up of first-person memories and contributes to your own sense of identity and history. If personal nostalgia is about what life was like for you in the past, historical nostalgia is a generalization about what the past was like, often in the form of a longing for an enchanted, simple world—the good old days. Collective nostalgia is the emotional attachment to collective cultural identities: "This is what my group was like" or "this is what my group endured in the past." Just like personal nostalgia, this emotion can be a source of strength that helps someone through difficult periods. The insight (or illusion) that your people or your nation endured something together can help and inspire. But it is also easily abused by political forces, who claim they can restore the greatness that has been lost. That is a false promise, because we can't go back—and even if we could, we wouldn't find what we were looking for. It was never there and, in any case, would not be able to give us the solution to our current problems. One way of revealing that is to look at what the good old days were really like. In a wonderful podcast episode, Build for Tomorrow host Jason Feifer explored nostalgia throughout history. If you want to make America great again, you have to ask yourself when America was great, he thought. The most popular answer seemed to be the 1950s. So then he asked scholars of the '50s whether people in the '50s thought they were the good old days. Definitely not. People were worried about race and class, the impact of television, and the very real threat of instant nuclear annihilation. There was anxiety about rapidly changing family life and especially the new youth cultures and mindless, consumer-oriented students on campus. American sociologists warned that rampant individualism was tearing the family apart. But there must have been exceptions. For example, being an autoworker in Detroit must have been amazing, considering how often this group is featured in current labor market nostalgia. Or was it? When historian Daniel Clark launched an oral history project to find out how the autoworkers themselves experienced it, he fully expected to hear stories about a lost Eden. However, as Clark wrote, "hardly anyone, male or female, white or African American, recalled the 1950s as a time of secure employment, rising wages, and improved benefits." Instead, Clark was told about economic volatility, precarious employment, and recurring unemployment. In 1952, one-tenth of all U.S. unemployment was concentrated in the city of Detroit. Impressive hourly wages don't say much about annual incomes if you are only called in temporarily and quickly let go. Most of the workers Clark spoke with recounted how they had to take secondary gigs (cab driver, trash hauler, janitor, cotton picker, moving company worker, golf caddy) to pay the bills. "Autoworkers fell behind on installment plans, resulting in repossessions of their purchases, and they found it impossible to keep up with mortgages and rents", Clark wrote. "Most autoworkers, and especially those with families, were priced out of the market for the new cars that they built." Our collective rosy memory of Detroit in the '50s is based on the fact that those who managed to hold on to a long-term full-time job in these industries had significantly better wages than most Americans, because the country was still so poor back then. This was especially true of the group employed during the mini-boom of 1953. In other words, the narrative of our lost era of manufacturing is based on a single American city in a single year during the very peculiar time after World War II, during which Europe's industrial infrastructure was destroyed. And how much did these lucky few get paid? Well, the autoworkers union managed to push up the hourly wage to about $1.30, which is equivalent to around $17 today. That happens to be the same average starting wage Amazon began to pay warehouse workers in May 2021. In fact, many people in the '50s pointed to the '20s as the good old days. But back in the 1920s, people worried about how rapid technological change was threatening our sanity—radio and recorded music gave us too much speed and choice. So did the automobile, which would probably ruin the morals of the young. In The New York Times, you could read on the front page that scientists had concluded that "american life is too fast." The famous child psychologist John Watson warned that increasing divorce rates meant the American family would soon cease to exist. Many romanticized the calmer lifestyle of the late 1800s. Seeing how family life was changing, some began to idealize the Victorian family, when they thought that fathers were really fathers, mothers were really mothers, and children respected their elders. But at the turn of the century, the railroads, the telegraph, and rapid urbanization were undermining traditional communities and ways of life. Many people worried about a fast-spreading disease caused by the unnatural pace of life: neurasthenia, which could express itself via anxiety, headaches, insomnia, back pain, constipation, impotence, and chronic diarrhea. The Victorian middle classes handled the transitions of the era by becoming the first generation to value the old as such; they started to care about antiques and covered their walls with portraits of ancestors. The historian John Gillis has shown that their fear of urbanization and of work outside the household led them to invent the notion of a traditional family life that has been lost—a time that was simpler, less problematic, more rooted in place and tradition. They felt life before the Industrial Revolution was better. In the U.S., many people longed for the quieter, happier life they had before the Civil War. Before the Industrial Revolution, family life was indeed different. Around half the members of a birth cohort died before they were 15 years old, and 27 percent of those who survived were fatherless by the time they reached that age. The share of marriages broken up prematurely by death was similar to the share broken up by divorces today. Most families sent children away to live in other households as servants or apprentices. After the French Revolution, Edmund Burke thought, "the age of chivalry is gone; that of sophisters, economists and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever." In America, many worried the republic had somehow lost its way since the Founders created it. Feifer and the scholars he talked to in his podcast episode continued to look for the good old days, wandering further back into the past until they reached ancient Mesopotamia, some 5,000 years ago. After inventing civilization and writing, it didn't take more than two centuries before humans started writing about how difficult life now was and how it must have been so much easier in the past. It seems the first society was also the first nostalgic society. The scholar Samuel Noah Kramer found examples of the Sumerians in cuneiform script complaining about how their leaders abused them and the merchants cheated and family life was not what it used to be. One clay tablet frets about "the son who spoke hatefully to his mother, the younger brother who defied his older brother, who talked back to the father." On an almost 4,000-year-old clay tablet, Kramer found the story of Enmerkar and the land of Aratta, an expression of the idea that there was once a golden age of peace and security, and that we had since fallen from this blessed state: Once upon a time, there was no snake, there was no scorpion, There was no hyena, there was no lion, There was no wild dog, no wolf, There was no fear, no terror, Man had no rival.… The whole world, the people in unison, To Enlil in one tongue gave praise. In other words, if you happen to think we have uniquely difficult problems today, with a more rapid pace of life, corrupt rulers, and unruly youngsters, don't trust your feelings. Every generation has thought the same. Every generation has interpreted its struggle with the human predicament and the difficulty of relationships as a sign that things have become worse since a supposedly more harmonious time. One important explanation for this historical nostalgia is that we know we survived these problems, so in retrospect they seem smaller. Otherwise we wouldn't be here. But we can never be certain we will be able to solve the problems we are facing today. That, however, has been the predicament of every generation, and that is why we always look back at a simpler time. We know the radio didn't ruin the young, but we don't know if the smartphone will. We know we survived smallpox and polio, but we don't know about Ebola or the coronavirus. We know the planet didn't blow up during the Cold War, but who can say for sure that it won't happen this time around? And this also leads us to forget the terrible anguish our ancestors suffered when dealing with what were then the worst difficulties that they could imagine. Another reason is that we often confuse personal nostalgia with the historical sort. When were the good old days? Was it by chance the one incredibly short period in mankind's history when you were alive and, more importantly, young? I can't say anything certain about you, of course, but when I ask people this question, that is the most common answer. And polls bear this out. A British study found that people in their 30s think life was better in the '90s than today. Brits in their 50s prefer the '80s, and those over 60 think life in the '60s was the best. A U.S. poll found that those born in the '30s and '40s thought the '50s was America's best decade, while those born in the '60s and '70s preferred the '80s. (It is interesting that the great nostalgic '70s and '80s television show Happy Days was set in a glamorous version of the '50s. A few decades later, we got another influential nostalgic television series, Stranger Things, now looking back fondly on the fashion and music of the 1980s, when we were all watching Happy Days.) Isn't that why we have this great wave of nostalgia in the Western world right now? The big and influential baby boomer generation is retiring, and a suspiciously large share of them think the good old days were during their youth. Because when we are young, life for most people is exciting: Something new awaits around every corner. We scheme and dream, but we can also feel pretty safe, because our parents are there to take care of us and pick up our bills. Eventually, we all grow older and learn about the horrors of the world. We take on more responsibility, and we have kids ourselves. Suddenly we have to pay attention to every kind of risk and problem in society. With time, some of our dreams are frustrated, a certain decay in physical capacity sets in, and what once seemed new and exciting is replaced by things the now-young think are new and exciting but seem strange and unsettling to us. It's easy to assume we have a clearer memory of things that happened to us recently. That is not the case. Researchers have found that we encode more memories during adolescence and early adulthood than during any other period of our lives, and when we think back on our lives, this is the period we most often return to. We might have this "reminiscence bump" because that was a period when we started forming our identity and experienced many firsts—first love, first job, first time we went to a Depeche Mode concert. It is a period of rapid change followed by stability, and so it figures prominently in our recollection of our lives. Although strong, those memories are notoriously unreliable. When schoolchildren returning from summer holiday are asked to name good and bad things from the break, their lists are almost equally long. When the exercise is repeated a couple of months later, the list of good things grows longer and the bad list gets shorter. By the end of the year, the good things have pushed out the bad from their memories completely. They don't remember their summer anymore; just their idealized image of it. It is difficult for any version of the present to compete with that. We should beware of politicians, populists, and parents who claim that things were better in the past and that we should try to recreate that former world. Certainly some things were better and we should investigate and learn from that, but trusting our gut feeling is letting ourselves be deceived by our reminiscence bump. Nostalgia is a necessary human psychological trait, but it's not a governing philosophy.

 

 23 /26 

0.6
"48 Hours" show schedule

"48 Hours" is the one to watch Saturday nights at 10/9c on CBS. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4| GAME DELAY: 10:14 ET/9:14c : After a young girl is adopted from Russia, her American parents come to believe she is capable of murder and return her. Years later,. "48 Hours" contributor Troy Roberts learns her surprising story. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4| GAME DELAY: 9:14 ET/8:14c : A farmer says he found his wife impaled by a corn rake. The rake has just four tines – so why does she have six puncture wounds? "48 Hours" contributor Jim Axelrod reports. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27| 10:01/9:01c : When Ahmaud Arbery was chased by three White men and shot in the street, his mother laid him to rest promising to get him justice. The promise is fulfilled when the men are found guilty. CBS News correspondent Omar Villafranca reports. DVR ALERT: Please note the show started one minute late at 10:01/9:01c SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 | 10/9c : When a woman uploads her DNA to a genealogy website, authorities show up at her door. Is there a double murderer in her family tree? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13 | 10/9c : An undelivered engagement ring leads to murder. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6 | 10/9c : A 15-year-old girl beaten to death with a golf club in a wealthy Connecticut neighborhood. Does her diary hold clues to the killer? SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 | 10/9c : Five deaths with a connection to one family. "48 Hours" contributor Nikki Battiste investigates SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23 | 10/9c Club owners open up for the first time after deadly fire kills 100. "48 Hours" contributor Jim Axelrod reports. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16 | 10/9c :The "voice" of 11-year-old Linda O'Keefe goes viral in the search for her killer. CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9: "48 Hours" did not air due to college football on CBS. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2 | 10/9c : Socialite Jasmine Hartin admits killing a top police official in Belize. For the first time she tells her detailed story of what happened to "48 Hours." Correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 | 10/9c : "48 Hours" goes inside the disappearance of Gabby Petito and the hunt for Brian Laundrie. CBS News national correspondent Jericka Duncan reports. SEASON PREMIERE| SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18| 10/9c : How did images of a 17 year old girl's murder go viral? CBS News national correspondent Jericka Duncan reports. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 | 10/9c : A judge's son is gunned down by a man delivering a package. 2,800 miles away, an eerily similar crime - this time the target is a lawyer. Who is behind the killings? "48 Hours" contributor Tracy Smith reports. SPECIAL NIGHT| WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8| 10/9c : ALL NEW: A former ballerina shoots her husband. Did she kill to save herself or was it out of spite? "48 Hours" contributor Jim Axelrod reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4| 10/9c : A former beauty queen vanishes. One man said he had answers. Why didn't anyone listen?. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4| 9/8c : A man dies from a gunshot wound – his friends say they discovered him. Police rule out foul play, but his family says there are troubling clues. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SPECIAL NIGHT| WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1| 10/9c : ALL NEW: The Daybell children claim their father was framed for the murders of JJ and Tylee. CBS New correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports SATURDAY, AUGUST 28 | 10/9c : College student Aniah Blanchard had a deep fear of being kidnapped. When she disappears, UFC fighter Walt Harris battles for justice for his stepdaughter. CBS News special correspondent James Brown reports. SPECIAL NIGHT| WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 25| 10/9c : ALL NEW: An anonymous letter writer threatens to expose a town's rumored secrets. Is anyone safe? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. SATURDAY, AUGUST 21 | 10/9c : A little girl grows up wondering who murdered her mother. Decades later, prosecutors learn a secret that answers the question."48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher reports. SATURDAY, AUGUST 14 | 10/9c : After a chance encounter at a bar a college student is murdered. Was it because she resembled the killer's ex? CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, AUGUST 7| 10/9c : A young mother shoots her partner claiming self-defense and abuse. The killing of the popular gymnastics coach divides a town. CBS News correspondent Jericka Duncan reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, AUGUST 7| 9/8c : Michelle Martinko fought for her life in a parking lot. Her attacker was left bleeding - creating the evidence that solved the case. CBS News correspondent Jamie Yuccas reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JULY 31| 10/9c : Did a love triangle lead to murder? After his fiancée is found dead, a man researches time travel to "correct a horrible mistake." CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JULY 31| 9/8c : Did Lizzie Borden really hack her parents to death? A surprising answer and an inside look at the haunting crime scene. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JULY 24| 10/9c : A young woman says she accidentally shot her boyfriend. Police say she confessed to murder – but there's no audio to prove it. What will the jury decide? CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JULY 24| 9/8c : A man on death row says his blood was planted at the crime scene. Will an empty vial help his case? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. SATURDAY, JULY 17 | 10/9c: : A music producer on the edge of stardom has a dark premonition – then he's gunned down. His parents want answers. "CBS This Morning: Saturday" co-host Michelle Miller reports. SATURDAY, JULY 10 | 10/9c : A young woman vanishes from her Florida condo - security footage captures a phantom figure calmly parking her car. Is it the kidnapper? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, JULY 3 | 10/9c : A survivor deals with the trauma after her stepbrother is convicted of killing her family in order to go to the prom. CBS News chief investigative and senior national correspondent Jim Axelrod reports. SATURDAY, JUNE 26 | 10/9c : A boxer is shot and stabbed by her husband but refuses to go down for the count. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. SATURDAY, JUNE 19 | 10/9c : A mother fights for the truth behind her son's killing - captured on video. Ahmaud Arbery was jogging when he was chased and shot. CBS News correspondent Omar Villafranca reports. SATURDAY, JUNE 12 | [10:22/9:22 start time due to SRX Racing on CBS] : A beloved cheerleader dies - what explains the unusual injuries to her body? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, JUNE 5 | 10/9c : Did an out-of-control home makeover lead to murder?"48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates. SATURDAY, JUNE 5 | 9/8c : Notorious serial killer Ted Bundy targeted three young Florida women in one of his final attacks. They survived and share their terrifying ordeal and long road to recovery. CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. SATURDAY, MAY 29 | 10/9c : A brilliant Ivy League student is murdered after he went to a California park with a former high school classmate. Was he killed because he was gay and Jewish? CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. SATURDAY, MAY 29 | 9/8c : The untold story of how investigators found Lori Vallow's missing children – buried on Chad Daybell's property. CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports. SATURDAY, MAY 22 | 10/9c : Millionaire Forrest Fenn hid a gold-filled chest somewhere in the Rockies and wrote a poem with cryptic clues. Tens of thousands searched for it and five people died trying. A story of obsession. "CBS This Morning" co-host Tony Dokoupil reports. SATURDAY, MAY 15 | 10/9c A Sister's Fight for her Brother: A sister stands by the brother accused of murdering their parents. She insists he's innocent and there's more to the story. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. SATURDAY, MAY 8 | 10/9c : A mother disappears. Texts reveal she has coronavirus - was someone using COVID to cover up a killing? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, MAY 8 | 9/8c : A college student goes missing and a podcaster turns up the heat to solve the case. "48 Hours" tracks down the prime suspect. CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports. SATURDAY, MAY 1 | 10/9c : He was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife. The "other woman" recorded his calls for the prosecution. With his death sentence now overturned there's a renewed push to clear him. CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports for "48 Hours." SATURDAY, APRIL 24 | 10/9c : Dani Green claimed the family dog killed her ex-husband, Ray, but when police arrived at the home there was no sign of man or dog. Dani told police they could search anywhere on the grounds -- except for a large toolbox. Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, APRIL 17 | 10/9c : The emotional homecoming of a man imprisoned for nearly 32 years. A judge ruled he was wrongfully convicted of murder, but is he home for good? Questions linger about the witness who blamed him. Erin Moriarty reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, APRIL 10| 10/9c : A woman is found dead and the scene appeared to be staged with a bottle of absinthe. West, a Marilyn Monroe look-alike, posted on OnlyFans, a website some use to share adult content - was a fan involved? "48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, APRIL 10| 9/8c : A teenager learns she's the target of a hit on the dark web. "48 Hours"' Peter Van Sant goes on a global manhunt to find Yura, the shadowy figure behind murder-for-hire sites. SATURDAY, APRIL 3: "48 Hours" did not air due to the 2021 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament on CBS. SATURDAY, MARCH 27 | 10/9c : A 12-year-old is kidnapped from her home 36 years ago. An unusual suspect is charged. "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. SATURDAY, MARCH 20: "48 Hours" is preempted due to the 2021 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament on CBS. *GAME DELAY: Our March 13 double feature started 12 minutes late in the east and central time zones due to NCAA basketball on CBS. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, MARCH 13| 10/9c* : Did an item found in many medicine cabinets play a role in the death of a millionaire? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, MARCH 13| 9/8c* : The FBI believes skulls drawn in blood are the number of victims murdered by a prolific serial killer. Inside the FBI search to identify them.:"48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, MARCH 6 | 10/9c : College student Aniah Blanchard had a deep fear of being kidnapped. When she disappears, UFC fighter Walt Harris battles for justice for his stepdaughter. CBS News special correspondent James Brown reports. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27 | 10/9c : Thirteen years after a child is abducted investigators have a credible suspect. Is the puzzle of what happened to her complete? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant investigates. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20| 10/9c : A judge's son is gunned down by a man delivering a package. 2,800 miles away, an eerily similar crime - this time the target is a lawyer. Who is behind the killings? CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20| 9/8c : A wealthy Florida businessman is arrested after a violent confrontation with his wife – she survived. Did his daughter's sumptuous wedding lead to a murderous rage? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 | 10/9c : Newly released video shows police grilling Michelle Troconis, the ex-girlfriend of Fotis Dulos, about the disappearance of his wife Jennifer: "I didn't do it." But does she know more? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6: "48 Hours" did not air due to the "NFL Honors" on CBS. Join us on February 13 for an all-new show. SATURDAY, JANUARY 30 | 10/9c : She was last seen leaving a casino. How her mom and detectives teamed up to find her body hidden for 15 years. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports SATURDAY, JANUARY 30 | 9/8c : A college student goes missing -- the "Find My Friends" app leads to her body as her suspected killer flees the country. Will he get away with murder? CBS News contributor Maria Elena Salinas reports SATURDAY, JANUARY 23 | 10/9c : A little girl grows up wondering who murdered her mother. Decades later, prosecutors learn a secret that answers the question. "48 Hours' correspondent Maureen Maher reports. SATURDAY, JANUARY 16 | 10/9c : After a chance encounter at a bar a college student is murdered. Was it because she resembled the killer's ex? CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JANUARY 9| 10/9c : A man dies from a gunshot wound – his friends say they discovered him. Police rule out foul play, but his family says there are troubling clues. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, JANUARY 9| 9/8c : A 13-year-old girl vanishes in 1981. Detectives believe she was murdered. Years later, a woman appears and claims to be the missing girl. Is she an impostor? "48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher reports. SATURDAY, JANUARY 2 | 10/9c : A former beauty queen vanishes. One man said he had answers. Why didn't anyone listen?. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26| 10/9c Did Lizzie Borden really hack her parents to death? A surprising answer and an inside look at the haunting crime scene. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26| 9/8c : A story of tragedy and triumph -- the murder of a young woman and how a her killer's heart saves the life of a dying woman. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19: "48 Hours" did not air due to the SEC Championship on CBS: Alabama @ Florida. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12 | 10/9c : New clues in one of the largest unsolved murder cases in the U.S. A victim's daughter speaks out for the first time. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. PROGRAM NOTE| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5: "48 Hours" did not air due to the SEC on CBS: Alabama @ LSU SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28| 10:01/9:01c : A college student goes missing and a podcaster turns up the heat to solve the case. "48 Hours" tracks down the prime suspect. CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21| 10/9c The Case Against Nicole Addimando: A young mother shoots her partner claiming self-defense and abuse. The killing of the popular gymnastics coach divides a town. CBS News' Jericka Duncan reports. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21| 9/8c : A woman accused of setting her house on fire and then intentionally running over her husband as he escaped the flames speaks out for the first time. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14 | 10/9c A boxer is shot and stabbed by her husband but refuses to go down for the count. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7 | 10/9c : Michelle Martinko fought for her life in a parking lot. Her attacker was left bleeding - creating the evidence that solved the case. CBS News correspondent Jamie Yuccas reports. 'SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31 | 10/9c The Murder of Anna Repkina: Did a love triangle lead to murder? After his fiancée is found dead, a man researches time travel to "correct a horrible mistake." Correspondent Tracy Smith reports. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24 | 10/9c A young woman vanishes from her Florida condo - security footage captures a phantom figure calmly parking her car. Is this the kidnapper? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. PROGRAM NOTE: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17: "48 Hours" was preempted due to the SEC on CBS: Georgia at Alabama. We return Saturday, October 24 at 10/9c with an all-new show. DOUBLE FEATURE| SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10| 10/9c : A mother fights for the truth behind her son's killing - captured on video. Ahmaud Arbery was jogging when he was chased and shot. CBS News' Omar Villafranca reports. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10 | 9/8c : A rare look inside a murder case where virtually everything from the first moments of the investigation through the verdict are captured on camera. "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 | 10/9c : The untold story of how investigators found Lori Vallow's missing children – buried on Chad Daybell's property. CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports for "48 Hours." WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2020 | 10/9c : A music producer on the edge of stardom has a dark premonition - then he's gunned down. His parents want answers. "CBS This Morning" co-host Michelle Miller reports. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2020 : A farmer says he found his wife impaled by a corn rake. The rake has just four tines – so why does she have six puncture wounds? CBS News chief investigative and senior national correspondent Jim Axelrod reports WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2020 : A young woman says she accidentally shot her boyfriend. Police say she confessed to murder – but there's no audio to prove it. What will the jury decide? CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2020 : A beloved cheerleader dies - what explains the unusual injuries to her body? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16: "48 Hours Suspicion" will not air due to the Academy of Country Music Awards on CBS. The show returns Wednesday, September 23 -- with an all-new episode. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2020 [SEASON PREMIERE] : Did an out-of-control home makeover lead to murder? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates. SEPTEMBER 9, 2020 [SERIES PREMIERE] A woman denies feeding her husband to tigers - what happened to Don Lewis? "48 Hours" has new clues. Correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. SEPTEMBER 5, 2020: : A family man targeted for death lives to climb out of his own "grave." Who wanted him dead? "48 Hours" goes inside the sting that took down a hit man-for-hire scheme. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant investigates. AUGUST 29, 2020 : An investigation into the death of a Hollywood therapist. Did the system do enough to protect her from alleged killer Gareth Pursehouse? Her former fiancé Drew Carey calls for updated laws. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. AUGUST 22, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : Did a Florida man hire a look-a-like to kill his wife? A GPS leads police right to the hitman's door. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. : Survivors confront the man known as The Golden State Killer, after his 40 year reign of terror. Correspondent Tracy Smith has the latest in the case. AUGUST 15, 2020 : A survivor deals with the trauma after her stepbrother is convicted of killing her family in order to go to the prom. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. AUGUST 8, 2020 : Hear from the woman at the center of a case prosecutors said was all about "sex, lies, money and murder." "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. AUGUST 1, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE Justice for Kelsey Berreth: An inside look at the startling evidence that helped convict against Colorado man Patrick Frazee for the murder of his fianceé. CBS News correspondent Nikki Battiste reports. Storm of Suspicion: "48 Hours" goes behind the scenes with investigators as they search for a mother of two who vanished just before Hurricane Harvey hit. Correspondent Maureen Maher investigates. JULY 25, 2020 A California man shot dead in his home — his ex-wife admits she pulled the trigger. Did a photo posted on social media lead to the man's death? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. JULY 18, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : How a bakery worker's secret plan to recover DNA from a discarded Coke can helped investigators solve the cold case of a college student murdered over Thanksgiving weekend. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. : More than two decades after Iowa TV anchor Jodi Huisentruit disappeared, "48 Hours" reveals new information into the investigation. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. JULY 11, 2020 : Twenty-six school children abducted and buried alive in a truck trailer by three young men. An incredible survival story. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. JULY 18, 2020 : Nearly four decades after the death of Hollywood star Natalie Wood, Los Angeles County Sheriff's investigators reveal new clues, new witnesses and a shocking revelation. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. : "48 Hours" explores the family feud over radio legend Casey Kasem -- how he died and who was responsible. At stake: an estate that could be worth $100 million. "48 Hours" Correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. JUNE 27, 2020 : A brutal murder and police have DNA evidence. Could a discarded cigarette lead investigators to a possible killer and close a case two decades later? CBS News correspondent Anne-Marie Green reports. JUNE 20, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : A woman repeatedly threatened to kill her ex. She enlisted her father to help make good on her promise. Why couldn't anyone stop her? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. Cold-Blooded Killer: A father goes hunting in a Florida lake and vanishes. Many thought he was eaten by alligators, but not his mother. Seventeen years later, stunning courtroom revelations: it was murder. "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. JUNE 13, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : The wife of a NYC businessman is suspected of murdering him with help from her brother -- why would she want him dead and why did it take more than two decades to crack the case? "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. : "48 Hours" goes inside a family's mission to restore their son's reputation after he was fatally shot by a police officer. CBS News special correspondent James Brown reports. JUNE 6, 2020 An Ohio mom is brutally murdered. A detective pursues the wrong suspects, while the real killer walked free. It would take a dedicated sheriff to find a real suspect. Were there other victims? CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. MAY 30, 2020 : Four young women attacked, only one survivor. "48 Hours"' Maureen Maher has been on the trail of serial killer Michael Gargiulo for more than a decade. How "48 Hours" helped crack one of the cases. MAY 23, 2020 : The parents of Brooke Skylar Richardson speak out -- the real story behind the international headlines in the case of an alleged unthinkable crime. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates. MAY 16, 2020 : Two children vanish and an Idaho mother won't say where they are. In their first network TV interview, her mother and sister say she'd never harm her children. So where are the kids? CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti reports. : A young woman vanished after a night out in Milwaukee in October 2013. Did a meeting set up on a dating app lead to the disappearance or was it someone she knew? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. MAY 9, 2020 : The FBI believes skulls drawn in blood are the number of victims murdered by a prolific serial killer. Inside the FBI search to identify them. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. MAY 2, 2020 : A 13-year-old girl vanishes in 1981. Detectives believe she was murdered. Years later a woman appears and claims to be the missing girl. Is she an impostor? "48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher reports. APRIL 25, 2020 : A college student goes missing -- the "Find My Friends" app leads to her body as her suspected killer flees the country. Will he get away with murder? CBS News contributor Maria Elena Salinas reports for "48 Hours." APRIL 18, 2020 : Did a young white woman cause a wrongful conviction by blaming a murder on a "black guy"? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty has new details in the case she been covering for 20 years. APRIL 11, 2020 : Notorious serial killer Ted Bundy targeted three young Florida women in one of his final attacks. They survived and share their terrifying ordeal and long road to recovery. CBS News correspondent Tracy Smith reports. APRIL 4, 2020 : A wealthy Florida businessman is arrested after a violent confrontation with his wife – she survived. Did his daughter's sumptuous wedding lead to a murderous rage? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. MARCH 28, 2020 : Did Lizzie Borden really hack her parents to death? A surprising answer and an inside look at the haunting crime scene. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. MARCH 21, 2020 : A man on death row says his blood was planted at the crime scene. Will an empty vial help his case? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. MARCH 14, 2020 : A story of tragedy and triumph -- the murder of a young woman and how her killer's heart saves the life of a dying woman. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. MARCH 7, 2020 : A rare look inside a murder case where virtually everything from the first moments of the investigation through the verdict are captured on camera. "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. FEBRUARY 29, 2020 Find Yura – Manhunt on the Dark Web: A teenager learns she's the target of a hit ordered on the dark web. "48 Hours"' Peter Van Sant goes on a global manhunt to find Yura, the shadowy figure behind murder-for-hire sites. FEBRUARY 22, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : An investigation into the death of a Hollywood therapist. Did the system do enough to protect her from alleged killer Gareth Pursehouse? Her former fiancé Drew Carey calls for updated laws. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. : An Irish businessman is killed by his American au-pair-turned-wife and her father. They claim self-defense. The dead man's sister fights to clear his name. "48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher investigates. FEBRUARY 15 2020 : Did a Florida man hire a look-a-like to kill his wife? A GPS leads police right to the hitman's door. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. FEBRUARY 8, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : A young woman claims she was attacked by an ex-boyfriend who carved the word boy into her arm. But the crime scene tells a different story. CBS News correspondent Jamie Yuccas reports. : Could a teenager be brainwashed by one parent to help murder the other parent -- and then make it look like a suicide? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. FEBRUARY 1, 2020 : A woman accused of setting her house on fire and then intentionally running over her husband as he escaped the flames speaks out for the first time. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. JANUARY 25, 2020 : A survivor deals with the trauma after her stepbrother is convicted of killing her family in order to go to the prom. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. JANUARY 18, 2020| DOUBLE FEATURE : Hear from the woman at the center of a case prosecutors said was all about "sex, lies, money and murder." "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. : Michelle Carter, convicted of involuntary manslaughter because she used text messages to encourage a friend to take his own life, is being released from jail. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty has the latest in the headline-making case. DECEMBER 31, 2019 : Three murders in Austin, Texas, and little evidence to go on. Did a man testing a thermal imaging camera inadvertently capture the image of one of the killers? "48 Hours" correspondent Maureen Maher investigates. DECEMBER 14, 2019 : Hostages chillingly reveal the terrifying three hours they spent held captive by a gunman inside a California supermarket. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. DECEMBER 7, 2019 : A California man shot dead in his home — his ex-wife admits she pulled the trigger. Did a photo posted on social media lead to the man's death? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty reports. : A former TV producer and windsurfing champion says he's in prison for a murder he didn't commit -- the only physical evidence against him: a teaspoon of sand. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates. NOVEMBER 30, 2019 : How a bakery worker's secret plan to recover DNA from a discarded Coke can helped investigators solve the cold case of a college student murdered over Thanksgiving weekend. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. NOVEMBER 23, 2019 Justice for Kelsey Berreth: An inside look at the startling evidence that helped convict against Colorado man Patrick Frazee for the murder of his fianceé. CBS News correspondent Nikki Battiste reports. NOVEMBER 16, 2019| DOUBLE FEATURE : A woman repeatedly threatened to kill her ex. She enlisted her father to help make good on her promise. Why couldn't anyone stop her? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. : Can a daughter's frantic 911 call convict or free her father from charges that he killed his wife? CBS News'Jim Axelrod reports. NOVEMBER 9, 2019 : A brutal murder and police have DNA evidence — could a discarded cigarette lead investigators to a possible killer and close a case two decades later? CBS News correspondent Anne-Marie Green reports. NOVEMBER 2, 2019 : A young woman vanished after a night out in Milwaukee in October 2013. Did a meeting set up on a dating app lead to the disappearance or was it someone she knew? "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant reports. OCTOBER 26, 2019| DOUBLE FEATURE : The wife of a NYC businessman is suspected of murdering him with help from her brother -- why would she want him dead and why did it take more than two decades to crack the case? "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports. : A teen's death appeared to be a suicide -- but investigators say she was helped by a friend who recorded it and weeks earlier texted "it's like getting away with murder." CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports. OCTOBER 19, 2019 An Ohio mom is brutally murdered. A detective pursues the wrong suspects, while the real killer walked free. It would take a dedicated sheriff to find a real suspect. Were there other victims? CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports. OCTOBER 12, 2019 : Twenty-six school children abducted and buried alive in a truck trailer by three young men. An incredible survival story. CBS News' David Begnaud reports. OCTOBER 5, 2019 : A mom vanishes and now her fiancé is in jail awaiting trial for her murder. His former rodeo queen girlfriend says she knows what really happened. CBS News correspondent Nikki Battiste reports. SEPTEMBER 28, 2019 : The parents of Brooke Skylar Richardson speak out -- the real story behind the international headlines in the case of an alleged unthinkable crime. "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates. SEPTEMBER 14, 2019| SEASON PREMIERE : Four young women attacked, only one survivor. "48 Hours"' Maureen Maher has been on the trail of serial killer Michael Gargiulo for more than a decade. How "48 Hours" helped crack one of the cases.

 

 24 /26 

0.4
Kat Edmonson takes a jazz pop swing at Christmas classics

The jazz/pop vocalist Kat Edmonson would probably have made a great singing star in the ’40s and ’50s. But she’s also doing fine right now. From the start, the Texas-born singer was blurring the lines between classic and alternative: Her first album in 2009 opened with back-to-back covers of Gershwin’s “Summertime” and The Cure’s “Just Like Heaven,” the latter done as a sultry torch ballad. “I always enjoy raising eyebrows,” she said in an interview this week. “I like defying people’s expectations and getting them to think differently; that’s part of the joy of being an artist. But in the same breath, I love to bring them what’s familiar and remind them of what feels good inside of them. And that’s not for the sake of safety, it’s more about being comfortable. In my show and my music I’m ultimately driving to a place of vulnerability, and I want the audience to go there with me. So I don’t turn out the classics because everybody likes them, it’s more because I want to put them into a warm and fuzzy place, so we can go deeper into the vulnerability of what the music has to offer.” One of her favorite things to do, she says, is to completely rearrange a familiar song — something she definitely did with the Cure tune. “I fell in love with that song in high school and would always request it at parties. I’d love to spin around on the dance floor and get lost in it, and it always takes me back to being 14 and in love with a new person every week. It was the kind of song that I wanted someone to sing for me. So when I sang it, I took all my romantic feelings about the song and made it more of a sensual thing.” Thursday night at City Winery she’ll connect with another longstanding love, namely Christmas music. Her new album “Holiday Swingin’ ” offers impeccably hip takes on the Christmas classics, plus an occasional ringer like the ’50s novelty “The Chipmunk Song.” As she said, “I grew up loving those old records, my mom was always playing them. As I’ve been getting older and learning more about the music I love, I’ve realized that Christmas tunes weren’t always such a thing; then there were movies like ‘White Christmas’ and it started exploding. So that’s something I absolutely cherish. I know there are always camps — some people never want to hear Christmas songs again, but I’m part of the camp that can’t wait.” During shutdown she got to realize another longtime ambition; being the host of an old-fashioned variety show. Her weekly livestreams grew into a full-fledged production with sets, comedy, special guests and audience requests; and all 60-plus episodes of “The Kat Edmondson Show” can now be found on YouTube. “I loved reruns of the variety shows that Dean Martin and Dinah Shore and Perry Como hosted, and always had the fantasy that I could do that too. I loved how those people could do everything — Dean Martin sang, danced, acted, hosted a show. And I always assumed that’s what it meant to have a career in show business. When I actually got into show business I saw that things are done differently now, but this was my chance to have the variety show I always wanted.” Part of the shows was real-time interaction with the online audience. “It’s a much different relationship; when I perform live it’s more a one-sided conversation. But I loved getting to know my fans better, and it became like a club. As things went on, I discovered they were more compassionate than I thought, more open-minded than I ever expected them to be. That created such an intimacy with the audience, and I can’t imagine giving that up.”

 

 25 /26 

0.7
Treat yourself to a girls’ night out – holiday edition

Holiday crafts and pageants with kids. Celebratory dinners with extended family. End-of-the-year lunches with work colleagues. Sneaking a lunch with your sweetie while you’re Christmas shopping together. Sure, it’s all part of the holiday shebang. But what’s missing from this picture? A proper girls night out, holiday style. That means dressing up a little, hitting the town, ordering a round of drinks, and getting creative with how and where you relax with your favorite ladies. And there are lots of options this year around Boston that balance COVID safety with fun. Many are outdoors, some start happening as of this week, lasting through December. Some are even extending through the entire winter season. Some are classic holiday traditions — or just great reasons to start a new one. Here are a few to start planning: What: Grab a group of gals and reserve time or hot boozy drinks and snacks over a game of curling, the storied winter sport, in the Liberty Hotel’s private courtyard. And on Thursday nights, stay into the evening for drinks at “Fashionably Late,” the hotel’s long-running series of fashion shows presented with local retailers. Where: The Liberty Hotel, 215 Charles St., 617-224-4000, libertyhotel. com. When: Starting Dec. 6, and through the winter season. Time slots are every Mon. -Fri. from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.; 5 to 7 p.m.; or 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Wear: Bundle up, baby. Think heavy and luxe — like the Cascade faux suede coat with faux fur trim by Fabulous Furs ($399 on neimanmarcus. com). What: “Miracle,” the much-loved holiday pop-up bar at Kimpton Marlowe Hotel, is back and beckoning you for revelry. The Lobby Bar turns into a cool-as-can-be Santa’s Workshop — complete with bartenders donning ugly sweaters, presents, train sets, ornaments hanging from the ceiling and carols. Where: Kimpton Marlowe Hotel, 25 Edwin H. Land Blvd., Cambridge. When: Daily through December every Sun. -Thurs. , 4:30-9:30 p.m. and Fri. and Sat., 5-10:30 p.m. Wear: A cocktail frock as festive as the decor — like the shining, emerald Sequined Open-Back Mini Dress ($198 on anthropologie. com). What: Multitask with your besties (hair touch-ups, nails and fantastic makeup) at my salon, then hit the Copley boutiques for a round of power shopping. Before you know it, you’re gorgeous — and finished with all your holiday gift buying. Where: Grettacole, Copley Place, 617-266-6166, grettastyle. com. When: Whenever you reserve for — no private bookings necessary. Wear: Cool flats (you’ll be tracking some serious mileage through all the stores), such as Christian Louboutin’s Mamadrague Camo Suede Red Sole Ballerina Flats ($645 on bergdorfgoodman. com). What: Tell the ladies to pull out their plaid button-downs and go soak up a big dose of holiday cheer. Each Friday late afternoon, an a la carte bar will start shaking up seasonal cocktails by the fire, and a fun feature will roll out. This week will spotlight a decadent make-your-own hot chocolate bar. Where: The lobby and adjacent bar at the Revere Hotel, 200 Stuart St., 617-482-1800, reverehotel. com. When: Every Friday evening starting at 4 p.m., throughout December. Wear: Flannel shirts, of course. But with some panache. See: Karl Lagerfeld’s Buffalo Plaid Shirt ($89.50 on bloomingdales.com).

 

 26 /26 

1.0
Arianna, 14, loves being ballet dancer

Arianna is a sweet and likable girl who likes to dance. She especially loves ballet and participates in ballet recitals every year. She does very well with her peers and is able to build and maintain healthy relationships. Legally freed for adoption, Arianna would thrive in a family of any constellation, either with or without other children in the home, that is able to provide her with a stable and consistent environment. An ideal family for Arianna will be able to continue the services she has in place to address her academic and social/emotional needs. Arianna has established a supportive relationship with her maternal aunt, which a family must help maintain after placement. Can you provide the guidance, love and stability that a child needs? If you’re at least 18 years old, have a stable source of income and room in your heart, you may be a perfect match to adopt a waiting child. Adoptive parents can be single, married or partnered; experienced or not; renters or homeowners; LGBTQ singles and couples. The process to adopt a child from foster care requires training, interviews and home visits to determine if adoption is right for you, and if so, to help connect you with a child or sibling group that your family will be a good match for. To learn more about adoption from foster care, call the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange at 617-964-6273 or go to mareinc. org. The sooner you call, the sooner a waiting child will have a permanent place to call home.


Total 26 articles.
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Created at 2021-12-06 03:51