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DC5n United States criminal in english 113 articles, created at 2021-07-08 06:19 articles set mostly negative rate -7.7
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4.1
Haitian president assassinated in attack at his home

Haiti is reeling after President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated by gunmen who broke into his home overnight. Ben Tracy reports. 2021-07-07 23:02 855Bytes www.cbsnews.com

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0.2
Trump’s lawsuits against big tech are just another fundraising tool

The cases likely won’t hold up in court, but that doesn’t really matter. 2021-07-07 20:40 4KB www.vox.com

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1.2
Judge rules Air Force mostly responsible for Texas church shooting

Federal Judge Xavier Rodriguez ruled the Air Force was 60% responsible for the mass shooting at a church in Texas in 2017 after failing to report gunman David Kelley's domestic abuse record to the FBI. 2021-07-07 22:45 3KB www.upi.com

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99.4
Teen who filmed George Floyd's death says uncle killed in car crash with Minneapolis police

The teen who filmed the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin said that her uncle was killed Tuesday in a fatal … 2021-07-07 19:39 3KB abcnews.go.com

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1.2
Florida building collapse lawsuits already piling up

Lawyers for 20 families impacted by the collapse of a beachfront condo building in Florida were in court for the first time Wednesday — as … 2021-07-07 19:28 2KB nypost.com

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0.5
Britney Spears' Conservator Won't Step Aside; Lynne Spears Asks Court to Allow Daughter to Hire Own Attorney

Jodi Montgomery, the conservator of Britney Spears' 'person,' said she would not step aside despite death threats. 2021-07-07 19:10 3KB variety.com

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0.4
Britney Spears’ Mom Supports Goal To Hire Own Lawyer & Says Singer Can ‘Care For Her Own Person’

In new court docs, Lynne Spears asked a judge to allow daughter Britney Spears to hire her own private lawyer to end her conservatorship 2021-07-07 19:07 3KB hollywoodlife.com

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1.4
On This Day: Dallas shooting leaves five officers dead

On July 7, 2016, a gunman opened fire at a peaceful Black Lives Matter rally in Dallas, killing four police officers and one transit officer. 2021-07-07 07:00 3KB www.upi.com

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0.3
Britney Spears' Testimony Fallout Continues With Resignation of Lawyer

Samuel D. Ingham III submitted a court filing on Tuesday, stating that he intends to resign as soon as the court can appoint another lawyer for the pop star. 2021-07-07 09:41 2KB www.newsweek.com

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1.3
Shooting of star Dutch reporter raises European concern

AMSTERDAM (AP) — European leaders and lawmakers expressed dismay Wednesday and rights advocates demanded justice after a veteran Dutch crime reporter was shot… 2021-07-07 09:57 2KB wtop.com

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0.1
Judge Strikes Down Challenge To New Georgia Voting Restrictions

It's the first court ruling on the law, and a major blow for voting rights advocates. 2021-07-07 17:21 2KB www.forbes.com

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0.7
DOJ: More than 535 charged for Capitol siege

The Justice Department said it has charged more than 535 people in connection to the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol building. 2021-07-07 09:52 2KB www.upi.com

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0.2
U. S. promises not to imprison Julian Assange under harsh conditions if Britain extradites him.

The Biden administration told a British court that the WikiLeaks founder would not be isolated and could serve out any sentence in Australia. 2021-07-07 21:21 4KB www.nytimes.com

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0.4
Why Every Couple From 'Love Island' US Has Broken Up

Here's what happened between every couple from 'Love Island' US. 2021-07-07 19:42 7KB www.bustle.com

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0.8
Hyderabad: Two arrested by Rachakonda police for identity theft

Hyderabad: The cyber crimes division of the Rachakonda police apprehended two men accused of identity theft and misusing credentials of a victim. The 2021-07-07 15:57 2KB www.siasat.com

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0.5
Capitol rioter busted for assault on cop, news photographer

A Pennsylvania man was charged Wednesday for attacking a police officer and a news photographer during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot , federal authorities said. The … 2021-07-07 21:37 2KB nypost.com

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1.8
Crane collapse in Philadelphia kills a man, injures another

A massive construction drill toppled over and crushed a man to death Tuesday night in Philadelphia, police said. Firefighters and police responded just after 9:10 … 2021-07-07 06:59 1KB abcnews.go.com

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0.2
Former South African leader Zuma turns himself in

Jacob Zuma was sentenced to 15 months in prison for contempt because he defied a court order for him to testify before a judicial commission investigating widespread allegations of corruption durin… 2021-07-07 23:09 4KB www.ocregister.com

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86.5
Police ID man,30, who was killed Tuesday in his St. Paul home

The circumstances of Keifer M. Morgan’s death remain under investigation, and no one had been arrested as of Wednesday afternoon. 2021-07-07 20:34 1KB www.twincities.com

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0.6
More than 535 arrested so far in Capitol riot case, while more than 300 suspects remain unidentified

More than 535 people have been arrested so far in what the government calls "the most complex investigation ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice." 2021-07-07 22:51 10KB www.cbsnews.com

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0.4
FBI Seized ‘Fully Constructed U. S. Capitol Lego Set’ from Alleged Capitol Rioter

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) seized a “fully constructed U.S. Capitol Lego set” from the home of a man facing charges in connection … 2021-07-07 19:27 2KB www.breitbart.com

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0.1
6 months after Capitol assault, DC still needs statehood

Six months have passed since the Capitol insurrection. In that time, members of Congress sought to create a bipartisan independent commission to investigate the attack, … 2021-07-07 18:52 5KB www.rollcall.com

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0.4
Judge grants sentence delay for cooperating Gaetz associate

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge agreed Wednesday to delay the sentencing of a key associate of Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida so … 2021-07-07 16:06 2KB www.washingtontimes.com

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0.7
Judge jails editor over reporter’s use of recorder in court

RALEIGH, N.C. — A North Carolina Superior Court judge put a small-town newspaper editor behind bars last month after one of his reporters … 2021-07-07 19:04 4KB nypost.com

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97.7
Suspected serial killer linked to series of slayings in Delaware and Pennsylvania indicted

A suspected serial killer linked to a spate of killings in Delaware and Philadelphia has been indicted on 41 felony charges in connection with the “brutal crime spree,” the Delaware Attorney General’s Office said. 2021-07-07 17:51 2KB www.nydailynews.com

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7.4
End Criminal US Wars Not Just Illegal Killings

The Pentagon has been castigated for undercounting the deaths of civilians in its foreign military operations. That might seem like ethical criticism. But it’s woefully... 2021-07-07 13:48 4KB sputniknews.com

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0.3
LA riots witnesses stand their ground on the right to bear arms on 'Tucker Carlson Originals'

Fox Nation host Tucker Carlson investigates the decline of gun rights over the last three decades and the right to self-defense in the latest … 2021-07-07 21:20 2KB www.foxnews.com

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0.6
Virginia taekwondo instructor charged with sexually assaulting a minor

A taekwondo instructor in Lorton, Virginia, has been arrested and charged with sexually assaulting a minor in 2019. 2021-07-07 14:54 1KB wtop.com

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0.6
Reminder of Capitol Riot Is About to Come Down

The fencing installed around the Capitol after the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection will start being removed as soon as Friday, but most visitors are still not allowed inside the iconic... 2021-07-07 22:45 2KB www.newser.com

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30.5
GoFundMe for Mohammad Anwar, Killed UberEats Driver, Hit $1M Before Girls Sentenced

Two girls have been committed to youth facilities until they turn 21 after the 66-year-old was killed during an armed carjacking. 2021-07-07 08:24 2KB www.newsweek.com

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1.1
Georgia golf pro was gunned down after he witnessed a crime, police say

A golf pro who was gunned down Saturday at a suburban Atlanta country club by a man who had driven a pickup truck onto the golf course was not the gunman's target but was killed because he had "witnessed an active crime taking place," the police said Tuesday. 2021-07-07 20:15 3KB www.wral.com

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1.5
The Real Toll From Prison Covid Cases May Be Higher Than Reported

Some deaths were not counted as part of prison virus tallies because hospitalized inmates were officially released from custody before they died. 2021-07-07 14:06 9KB www.nytimes.com

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86.9
Second man charged in shooting death of pregnant Fayetteville woman

A second man was arrested Wednesday in the fatal shooting of a pregnant woman in Fayetteville two months ago, police said. 2021-07-07 20:35 1KB www.wral.com

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2.5
Teen Sentenced in 'Terrible' Death of Uber Eats Driver

Both teens who pleaded guilty in connection with a March 23 carjacking that ended in the death of an Uber Eats driver will be placed in juvenile detention until they turn 21—the... 2021-07-07 19:46 1KB www.newser.com

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0.2
Two more men arrested in Massachusetts standoff are arraigned

Not guilty pleas to firearms and other charges were entered on behalf of Conrad Pierre and a man who has refused to identify himself to authorities. 2021-07-07 22:12 3KB www.pressherald.com

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0.4
Zack Snyder Sets Netflix Movie ‘Rebel Moon,’ Based on Rejected ‘Star Wars’ Pitch

Zack Snyder ‘s collaboration with Netflix is flying off to a galaxy far, far away. The  Justice League   director has set his next project … 2021-07-07 16:30 2KB decider.com

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4.9
Four Dogs Maul 77-Year-Old Woman to Death in Arizona

Maria Ruiz was reportedly sitting on her front porch when the dogs attacked and killed her. 2021-07-07 08:41 2KB www.newsweek.com

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3.9
Thousands protest in Spain after man killed in suspected homophobic attack; 3 suspects arrested

Three people have been arrested in connection to the death of Samuel Luiz, a 24-year-old man who was beaten to death in northwestern Spain … 2021-07-07 18:07 4KB www.usatoday.com

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0.3
Nandigram poll results: Calcutta HC judge recuses himself, fines Mamata Banerjee Rs 5 lakh

In her plea, Banerjee cited ‘likelihood of bias’, claiming that Justice Kausik Chanda was associated with the BJP during his days as a lawyer. 2021-07-07 07:21 4KB scroll.in

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0.2
Rudy Giuliani’s Legal Defense Fund Is Not Going Well

A campaign to raise $5 million to help pay Rudy Giuliani's mounting legal fees is going about as well as that new hair dye Rudy's using. 2021-07-07 13:44 3KB uproxx.com

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1.7
Owner of venom-spitting cobra that escaped in Raleigh faces 40 misdemeanor charges

Christopher Gifford, 21, faces 40 charges for violating a state statute regulating the ownership of venomous reptiles. 2021-07-07 21:46 859Bytes myfox8.com

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1.1
New York declares US's first 'disaster emergency' on gun crime as shooting deaths overtake COVID

Data from the NYPD shows 2,337 gun arrests have been made citywide since the beginning of this year up until 4 July, with Kings County recording the highest number with 992. 2021-07-07 07:54 3KB news.sky.com

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1.5
Celebrity Deaths in 2021: Stars We’ve Lost

Us Weekly pays tribute to the celebrities who passed away in 2021 — photos 2021-07-07 16:07 3KB www.usmagazine.com

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0.5
Religion and the Capitol Attack

What we know about those arrested for the 6 January insurrection. 2021-07-07 11:18 9KB www.outsidethebeltway.com

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2.6
Cleveland man charged with threatening to kill Nancy Pelosi

A Cleveland man has been charged with threatening to kill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for “committing treason” against the US, court documents show. David Staudohar, 53, … 2021-07-07 22:00 3KB nypost.com

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1.1
Death of Bay Area man at Lake Oroville investigated as murder

I spent the Fourth in the thick of Tahoe's chaos. It got weird. Woman, 75, suffers … 2021-07-07 16:29 1KB www.sfgate.com

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1.4
Trump says 'no reason' for officer to shoot rioter, pushing conspiracy theory

Former President Trump claimed on Wednesday that there was “no reason” for a rioter to be shot during the Jan. 6 insurrection on the Capitol. … 2021-07-07 21:41 3KB thehill.com

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0.4
USA Today to charge for online content

USA Today announced on Wednesday that it is putting digital content behind a paywall for the first time. Much of the outlet’s breaking news stories … 2021-07-07 14:23 2KB thehill.com

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0.7
Pediatrician facing 98 sex charges not competent to stand trial, judge rules

A Maryland pediatrician charged with almost 100 sex crimes against children is incompetent to stand trial — partly because of his belief in an “Evil Black Witch,” a judge ruled Wednesday. 2021-07-07 21:08 3KB www.nydailynews.com

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1.0
Simone Biles opens up about sexual abuse torment: ‘Closest thing to death’

Simone Biles is ready to share her story. In the most recent episode of her docu-series, “Simone vs. Herself,” the 24-year-old … 2021-07-07 21:05 5KB nypost.com

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0.9
REPORT: Sofia Vergara And Husband Joe Manganiello’s Mansion Vandalized, Man Arrested

Sofia Vergara and husband Joe Manganiello’s Los Angeles mansion was reportedly vandalized and a man was arrested and booked on felony charges. “On July 4 … 2021-07-07 20:22 1KB dailycaller.com

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2.6
Kyle Rittenhouse’s attorney blames shooting on victim’s sex offender status

Kyle Rittenhouse’s attorney wants to argue that one of the men the teen killed during a Wisconsin Black Lives Matter protest was a sex offender … 2021-07-07 20:16 3KB nypost.com

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0.8
Prosecutor: Newspaper gunman spoke of making trial 'a farce'

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- The man who killed five people at a Maryland newspaper told a state psychiatrist that he intended to make “a farce” out of … 2021-07-07 19:38 4KB abcnews.go.com

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0.6
Rapper Pooh Shiesty held on federal gun and robbery charges

Rapper Pooh Shiesty is being held without bond on federal gun and robbery charges, according to a Justice Department statement on Wednesday . A Miami-based … 2021-07-07 18:37 2KB thehill.com

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0.3
Report: Convicted Terrorists Led Religious Services in Federal Prisons - Washington Free Beacon

Convicted terrorists linked to the Islamic State and al-Qaeda led religious services at one-third of the federal prisons audited by a federal watchdog, … 2021-07-07 18:30 3KB freebeacon.com

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1.1
Pharmacy exec resentenced to 14 years in meningitis outbreak

A founder of a now-defunct Massachusetts pharmaceutical facility responsible for a deadly meningitis outbreak will spend 14 and a half years behind bars, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, lengthening his initial punishment of nine years that was tossed out by an appeals court. 2021-07-07 17:59 4KB www.wral.com

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0.0
Lawyer: Jordan court to rule Monday in royal sedition case

Jordan’s state security court is to issue its verdict in a high-profile sedition case against a former senior official and a member of the … 2021-07-07 17:37 3KB abcnews.go.com

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0.5
How Big Business Uses Big Government To Kill Competition

Corporations can afford robots. Their competitors often cannot. 2021-07-07 16:39 4KB reason.com

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0.4
11 people arrested and charged for interrupting school board meeting to protest Utah mask policy

An angry mob interrupted a Granite School District board meeting in May – when the mask mandate wasn't even on the agenda. 2021-07-07 15:33 3KB www.cbsnews.com

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0.4
Taliban Attack a Provincial Capital in Afghanistan’s North, Freeing Prisoners

Continuing their offensive, the Taliban forces seemed poised to overrun the city, though Afghan airstrikes slowed the assault. 2021-07-07 12:20 5KB www.nytimes.com

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0.5
France: 11 convicted of cyberbullying teen who slammed Islam

PARIS (AP) — A French court on Wednesday convicted 11 of 13 people charged with harassing and threatening a teenager who harshly criticized Islam in online… 2021-07-07 09:35 2KB wtop.com

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0.1
Record Number of Pro-Life Bills Passed in 2021 - Washington Free Beacon

States have enacted a record number of pro-life bills in 2021 as the Supreme Court prepares to issue its verdict on the constitutionality of … 2021-07-07 18:05 4KB freebeacon.com

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0.2
TRENDING ON TOWNHALL MEDIA

I hope his lawyers told him before he went ahead with this that if it proceeds to trial, the companies’ lawyers will want to depose him about what led to him being banned from their sites. Which... 2021-07-07 12:41 5KB hotair.com

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0.3
PH Supreme Court restores pension, lifts gov't employment ban on dismissed Sandiganbayan judge

The Philippine Supreme Court ruled in favor of a sacked Sandiganbayan justice who was linked to pork barrel scam mastermind Janet Lim Napoles. 2021-07-07 14:25 1KB news.abs-cbn.com

 65 
0.1
Democrats' plans to make election cheating easier

Congressional Democrats and their media allies are using Thursday's Supreme Court ruling upholding Arizona's anti-fraud voting laws as a pretext to ram … 2021-07-07 23:02 4KB www.wnd.com

 66 
0.3
Hawaii Bill Legalizing Stun Guns Just Became Law Today, Will Become Effective Jan.1

Rhode Island, maybe New York, Wilmington (Delaware), and a few small towns are the only places in the U.S. that still forbid stun guns. 2021-07-07 22:26 2KB reason.com

 67 
0.2
Portland rent control ordinance survives legal challenge by landlords

A judge uphold the city's voter approved protections for renters, including limits on rent increase. 2021-07-07 22:26 4KB www.pressherald.com

 68 
0.7
2-year jail sentence for golfer Cabrera over assault charges

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Argentinian golfer Ángel Cabrera, a former Masters and U.S. Open champion, was sentenced on Wednesday to two years in prison on assault… 2021-07-07 22:21 2KB wtop.com

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0.4
Westchester trash hauler charged with running up bills at NYC strip clubs

This wasn’t the kind of bust they had in mind. A trash hauler under contract with Westchester County was arrested for running up $135,000 … 2021-07-07 21:58 2KB nypost.com

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0.3
Michael Avenatti's Post-Trial Motions Denied

I know nothing about the subject, and despite that have no opinion. But I thought I'd pass along Judge Paul 2021-07-07 21:32 2KB reason.com

 71 
0.4
'To Catch a Predator' host Chris Hansen calls warrant for his arrest a 'non-event'

Clearing up his recent legal trouble in Michigan, Chris Hansen, said\u00a0his arrest\u00a0was\u00a0a \ 2021-07-07 21:11 3KB eu.freep.com

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2.6
Vadnais Heights man gets 140 months in prison for Payne-Phalen murder

A Vadnais Heights man was sentenced to 11 years and eight months in prison Wednesday for killing a father of four last year in St. Paul. Daniel Marcel Sheppard, 44, fatally shot 31-year-old Ervin D… 2021-07-07 21:11 3KB www.twincities.com

 73 
0.1
Police Issue Alert After Armed Robbers Struck This Past Saturday Night In Chinatown, River North

Police on Wednesday warned the public about a string of armed robberies that all happened in the evening hours this past holiday weekend in Chinatown and River North. 2021-07-07 21:06 1KB chicago.cbslocal.com

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0.9
Four injured by gunfire in Fort Pierce; police investigate

Jessie Charoo was sitting on her couch when she heard the gunfire. 'When I did peep out the back door, all I seen was police and crime scene,' she said. 2021-07-07 20:39 3KB eu.tcpalm.com

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0.8
Arthur Keith's Family Demands Civil Rights Probe Into His Death At Hands Of Cleveland Cop

A grand jury decided this week not to charge the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority police officer who fatally shot the 19-year-old. 2021-07-07 20:29 3KB www.newsweek.com

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0.5
Woman engaged to convict she’s never met — who gets sprung in 2032

She’s got a cellmate for a soulmate. A Netherlands woman redefined the term “cellmate” after getting engaged to a US prisoner she’s never met — … 2021-07-07 20:13 6KB nypost.com

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0.5
Fact-checking claims bail reform is driving increase in violent crime

Violent crime in the United States shot up last year as the pandemic raged. Major cities across the country saw a more than 30% jump in homicides as well as increases in aggravated assaults, according to a January report from the National Commission on Covid-19 and Criminal Justice. 2021-07-07 20:10 6KB edition.cnn.com

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0.7
Remaining ‌’Rise‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Moors’ ‌members‌ charged in highways standoff arraigned

Arraignments of the Rise of the Moors militia group continued in a similarly bizarre fashion Wednesday morning as they did Tuesday, as the last two members of the group went before judge Emily Karstetter in Malden District Court following an armed standoff on a Wakefield stretch of highway Saturday morning. 2021-07-07 19:10 3KB www.bostonherald.com

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1.0
Man arrested on hate crime charges during Israel-Palestine protests

A Staten Island man was arrested on hate crime charges Wednesday for allegedly throwing a firework at a woman from a pickup truck in Manhattan’s Diamond District … 2021-07-07 19:09 2KB nypost.com

 80 
0.7
Judge denies sentencing break to corrupt ex-Chicago cop Joseph Miedzianowski

The judge wrote that Miedzianowski "led a double-life and managed to deceive even those closest to him. He damaged numerous lives; not just his own." 2021-07-07 18:50 2KB chicago.suntimes.com

 81 
0.5
Diplo Sued by Woman Claiming He Pushed Her into Oral Sex

The DJ is facing accusations of assault, battery and false imprisonment. 2021-07-07 18:39 2KB www.tmz.com

 82 
0.8
Tennessee driver charged with attempted murder tried to plow down Memphis officer on sidewalk: court docs

A Tennessee man is facing several charges, including attempted murder , after allegedly swerving through traffic in downtown Memphis on the Fourth of July and intentionally … 2021-07-07 18:37 2KB www.foxnews.com

 83 
0.3
RBI imposes penalty of up to Rs 2 cr on 14 banks for non-compliance

Read more about RBI imposes penalty of up to Rs 2 cr on 14 banks for non-compliance on Business Standard. The penalty ranges from Rs 50 lakh to Rs 2 crore, with SBI being charged Rs 50 lakh and BoB Rs 2 crore 2021-07-07 18:31 2KB www.business-standard.com

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0.9
Three Hong Kong teens charged with terror bomb plot

The three teenagers were arrested along six other people during an operation to dismantle an attempt to place bombs around Hong KongThe 2021-07-07 18:12 2KB www.bignewsnetwork.com

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1.9
Teen found guilty of murdering sisters in ‘blood pact with devil’

A British teen has been found guilty of murdering two sisters in a London park — after he claimed he had a blood pact with … 2021-07-07 18:06 4KB nypost.com

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0.6
Lori Vallow Daybell Requests Change of Venue, Claiming a ‘Fair and Impartial Jury Cannot Be Had’ in County Where Kids’ Bodies Were Buried

Lori Vallow Daybell, facing murder charges for the deaths of her children, asked an Idaho judge for a venue change, claiming she cannot receive a fair trial. 2021-07-07 17:37 4KB lawandcrime.com

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0.3
American Political Prisoner Asks Russian Court To Serve Sentence In US: REPORT

Russian political prisoner Paul Whelan, a U.S. citizen and former Marine, will reportedly request to serve the remainder of his sentence in the U. … 2021-07-07 17:12 2KB dailycaller.com

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0.2
Judge Frees 76-Year-Old Woman Sent Back to Federal Prison After Missing a Phone Call from Officials

Controversy highlights punishing responses to mundane mistakes during post-release monitoring of felons. 2021-07-07 17:05 4KB reason.com

 89 
0.8
Philly Cop Who Allegedly Deleted Witness Video During Arrest Sued

Officer Burnett is being dragged into court over the March scuffle. 2021-07-07 16:53 2KB www.tmz.com

 90 
0.3
After 5 Years Of Appeals, Former Cop Convicted Of Forcing Teens To Strip Naked During Traffic Stop Begins 10 Year Sentence

After five years of appeals, a former Florida police officer convicted of coercing a teenage boy and girl to strip naked at a traffic stop … 2021-07-07 16:50 2KB dailycaller.com

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0.5
Parents of kidnapped students in Nigeria plea for help

KANO, Nigeria (AP) — Praying, crying and waiting for news about their children, the parents of more than 120 Nigerian students abducted by armed bandits at the… 2021-07-07 15:56 4KB wtop.com

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0.3
Army Reservist With Hitler Mustache Who Worked at Weapons Facility Will Remain Jailed Pending Trial in U. S. Capitol Siege, D. C. Circuit Rules

Affirming the pre-trial detention of a white supremacist Army Reservist, the D.C. Circuit on Wednesday unanimously upheld a standard for keeping those charged with the breach of the U.S. Capitol locked up before trial. 2021-07-07 15:52 5KB lawandcrime.com

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0.7
Protester Arrested After Shooting Olympic Torch With Water Pistol

The 53-year-old woman was filmed trying to drench a torch bearer in eastern Japan while shouting slogans such as "No Olympics" and "Stop the Games." 2021-07-07 15:38 2KB www.newsweek.com

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0.2
High court to decide fate of Detroit charter revision plan

Detroit voters should be able to vote on wide-ranging revisions to their city charter regardless of Whitmer's opinion on the matter, a lawyer argued. 2021-07-07 15:07 4KB eu.detroitnews.com

 95 
0.8
There’s Major Updates In The WAGatha Christie Scandal Court Proceedings

Here's what we know so far. 2021-07-07 14:55 7KB www.bustle.com

 96 
0.2
Rob Manfred’s split-doubleheaders are stealing from baseball fans

This ought to be a layup for Ron Manfred, and the embattled commissioner of baseball sure could use a couple of point-blank easy decisions. … 2021-07-07 14:51 4KB nypost.com

 97 
1.3
The Parable of the Soldier at the Bank

on the proper role of legal corpus linguistics, by C'Zar Bernstein 2021-07-07 14:47 2KB reason.com

 98 
0.4
Andy Dick and fiancée Elisa Jordana break up after his assault arrest

Andy Dick and his fiancée Elisa Jordana have broken up after he was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon last month. 2021-07-07 14:32 2KB pagesix.com

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0.3
'Bitcoin King' Arrested in Alleged $300M Fraud Scheme After Reporting Hack

Cláudio Oliveira is accused of staging a false Bitcoin theft in an effort to embezzle money. 2021-07-07 14:30 3KB www.newsweek.com

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0.3
Drake Bell Confirms He Is Married And Has A Child Ahead of Court Sentencing

The singer and former Nickelodeon star, 35, has pleaded guilty to attempted child endangerment, with sentencing due to take place in July. 2021-07-07 14:24 3KB www.newsweek.com

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0.6
Two Hong Kong students found guilty of rioting during 2019 campus protest

Judge dismisses claims by Cheung Chun-ho and Tang Hei-man they went to scene of clashes at Sha Tin campus of Chinese University either by mistake or out of curiosity. 2021-07-07 14:01 4KB www.scmp.com

 102 
96.3
WATCH| The death of Ishmael Gama at the hands of Gauteng police

On 1 April 2020, Ishmael Gama was reportedly tortured and killed by police officers in Lenasia, Johannesburg. More than a year after his death, and months after the police watchdog implicated eight officers in murder, police management has not acted. But, this is not an unusual scenario. 2021-07-07 13:41 1KB www.news24.com

 103 
2.0
L. A. sees alarming spike in killings, shootings: 'Too many guns in too many hands'

The availability of guns is fueling a surge in homicides and shootings in Los Angeles, police say, and activists are bracing for tough months ahead. 2021-07-07 12:00 7KB www.latimes.com

 104 
2.4
Afghans Accused of Murdering Teen Had Years-Old Deportation Orders

Three of the four Afghan migrants suspected of raping and murdering a 13-year-old Austrian girl had their asylum claims declined. But due to … 2021-07-07 11:30 3KB www.breitbart.com

 105 
9.3
Watch: Silent protest against Stan Swamy’s death in Bandra, Mumbai

A citizens’ protest. 2021-07-07 11:30 779Bytes scroll.in

 106 
3.3
What Are Poppers? Risks, Side Effects Explained As FDA Reports Spike in Deaths

The drugs can increase sex drive, but are known to cause brain death and cardiac arrest. 2021-07-07 11:06 4KB www.newsweek.com

 107 
0.3
Former Michigan female prisoners settle sexual assault claims for $495,000

Norman Laughlin's 2020 conviction showed that sexual abuse continued at Women's Huron Valley after the state agreed to pay $100 million in 2009. 2021-07-07 10:02 4KB eu.freep.com

 108 
0.2
Australia Shows The Most Humane Border Policy Is Enforcing The Laws

There is nothing humane about yielding border control to criminal cartels who traffic and abandon toddlers and brutally rape children and women. 2021-07-07 10:00 8KB thefederalist.com

 109 
1.3
Steidler: Recovering from Washington’s fumble on opioid epidemic

With opioid deaths rising 29% during the pandemic, killing more than 55,000 Americans annually, Washington must do more to save lives. 2021-07-07 09:08 4KB www.bostonherald.com

 110 
6.9
Critic’s Death Puts Focus on Palestinian Authority’s Authoritarianism

Protests against the increasingly autocratic rule of President Mahmoud Abbas and his limits on freedom have been harshly suppressed. 2021-07-07 09:02 10KB www.nytimes.com

 111 
0.9
McDonald's Customers Pull Gun on Manager Over Dispute About Salt on Fries

One of the suspects who allegedly threatened staff at the Texas branch was out on probation for aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. 2021-07-07 08:14 3KB www.newsweek.com

 112 
0.9
Mexican YouTuber arrested on child pornography charges

A controversial YouTuber was detained on charges of child pornography in Mexico City after showing video of a sexual assault to her millions of followers, … 2021-07-07 08:00 2KB nypost.com

 113 
0.4
Legal gray area allows opening of cannabis-friendly campground in Harrison

Although marijuana social clubs and other businesses for onsite consumption are prohibited, private campgrounds exist in a 'murky' legal area. 2021-07-07 08:00 10KB www.pressherald.com

Articles

DC5n United States criminal in english 113 articles, created at 2021-07-08 06:19

 

 1 /113 

4.1
Haitian president assassinated in attack at his home
(47.99/48)

Haiti is reeling after President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated by gunmen who broke into his home overnight. Ben Tracy reports.
President Of Haiti Assassinated In Attack At Home, Official Says
dailycaller.com
Biden condemns 'heinous' assassination of Haitian president
thehill.com
Haiti’s president assassinated at home amid political instability
independent.ie
Dominican Republic Closes Border After Haiti President's Murder As Spain Calls For 'Unity'
newsweek.com
Official: Haiti President Jovenel Moïse assassinated at home
wtop.com
Haitian President Jovenel Moïse killed in attack at home
nydailynews.com
Haiti President Jovenel Moïse assassinated at home
usatoday.com
Video reportedly shows the aftermath of Haiti president's assassination
businessinsider.com
What we know about the death of Haiti's president
edition.cnn.com
Haitian President Jovenel Moïse assassinated in his home
cbsnews.com
'Mercenaries' assassinate Haiti President Jovenel Moise at home; wife hurt
upi.com
Haiti President Jovenel Moise assassinated at home
business-standard.com
Haiti President Jovenel Moïse assassinated at home; Biden calls it 'very worrisome'
usatoday.com
Haitian President Jovenel Moise killed in attack at his home, country now in state of emergency
abcnews.go.com
Haiti in upheaval: President Moïse assassinated at home
ocregister.com
Haiti's president was a controversial leader
edition.cnn.com
Haiti in upheaval: President Moïse assassinated at home
twincities.com
Assassins Kill President of Haiti in Midnight Home Invasion
breitbart.com
2 farmers slain in Benguet gun attack
newsinfo.inquirer.net
Jovenel Moïse, Haiti’s embattled president, killed at 53
wtop.com
Haiti President Jovenel Moïse assassinated at home; Biden calls it 'very worrisome'
usatoday.com
France condemns assassination of Haiti's President Jovenel Moise
bignewsnetwork.com
Live Updates: Haiti’s President Is Assassinated
nytimes.com
U. S. Closes Embassy Following Assassination Of Haitian President
dailywire.com
Biden condemns 'heinous' assassination of Haitian president
bignewsnetwork.com
Haiti President Jovenel Moise assassinated - interim PM
bignewsnetwork.com
Official: Haiti President Jovenel Moïse assassinated at home
bostonherald.com
Haitian President Jovenel Moise was assassinated overnight in his home
roundnews.com
Biden condemns assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moise
cnbc.com
Your Thursday Briefing
nytimes.com

 

 2 /113 

0.2
Trump’s lawsuits against big tech are just another fundraising tool
(21.99/48)

Donald Trump filed lawsuits against Facebook, Twitter, and Google on Wednesday, accusing the companies of violating his and other conservatives’ First Amendment rights. But winning these lawsuits seems to be beside the point for Trump. Legal experts say these are frivolous cases likely to be thrown out of court, but Trump is already using them as a way to fundraise from supporters. The suits are also a convenient distraction from the ongoing New York state investigation into his company’s alleged tax fraud, which has been the main story about Trump in the news lately. It’s not the first time Trump has used this tactic. During his presidency, Trump repeatedly attacked tech companies — despite the fact that he benefited enormously from his reach on social media platforms like Twitter — by making unfounded claims that these firms have anti-conservative biases. And though his attempts to penalize the tech industry with unenforceable executive orders, bogus “tech summits,” and vague threats have never seriously interfered with Facebook’s, Google’s, or Twitter’s ability to run their businesses, these efforts have served Trump well politically. He’s garnered support among his followers, collected money, and dominated headlines as a crusader against a liberal Silicon Valley. These new lawsuits seem to be no different. At a press conference announcing the lawsuits, a representative for the America First Policy Institute, a pro-Trump nonprofit that filed the suits on behalf of the former president, encouraged anyone who’s interested in joining Trump in his class-action suits to sign up on a website. But if you go to that website, TakeOnBigTech.com, it lands on a promotional video that only links to an option for donating money to the America First Policy Institution — and it doesn’t offer a clear way to sign on to the suit. Shortly after he announced the lawsuits, Trump started sending “breaking news alert” text messages directly to his followers that asked them to donate to his Save America PAC. According to a New York Times reporter who posted it on Twitter, the text message to his followers reads in part: “Pres Trump: I am SUING Facebook & Twitter for UNCONSTITUTIONAL CENSORSHIP. For a short time,5x-IMPACT on all gifts! Donate NOW” — and it links to a website taking donations to the Save America PAC. In addition to the fundraising opportunities, starting a new fight against Big Tech gives Trump’s supporters something else to focus on besides the headlines about how New York state prosecutors indicted the Trump Organization and its chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, for tax fraud earlier this month. Prosecutors allege that Weisselberg and Trump’s company did not pay taxes on $1.7 million in indirect employee compensation. The whole case is part of a larger investigation into the former president’s company; the investigation is expected to widen, potentially becoming more damning for Trump. In the past, Trump has frequently turned Facebook, Twitter, and Google into boogeymen for supposedly displaying anti-conservative bias, but his claims often served to distract from larger political issues. The constant accusations also seemed to put pressure on tech companies, which generally did not enforce their own rules against Trump until the final days of his presidency, when he was banned for inciting violence prior to the January 6 Capitol riot. Now that Trump is out of office and receiving significantly less media attention, it’s unclear whether he’ll be able to sustain this latest publicity crusade against the tech giants. But there’s no doubt that at least for now, these lawsuits serve as a welcome break from news of Trump’s tax-related legal affairs — as well as a prime opportunity to raise some cash.
Republican shatters fundraising records – and it's not who Trump endorsed
wnd.com
Parler cheers on Trump's lawsuit against Big Tech companies
foxnews.com
Donald Trump: Tech Lawsuit ‘Will Prove Censorship Is Unlawful, Unconstitutional’
breitbart.com
Donald Trump sues tech giants to ‘stop the silencing’
independent.ie
Trump And GOP Swiftly Fundraise Off Long-Shot ‘Censorship’ Lawsuit Against Big Tech
forbes.com
BREAKING: Trump Sues Big Tech
pjmedia.com
Trump sues Facebook and Twitter for banning his accounts after January 6 attack
cbsnews.com
Trump announces a lawsuit against tech firms for censoring him, and fund-raises off it.
nytimes.com
Trump’s lawsuits against Facebook, Twitter, and Google will probably go nowhere
vox.com
Trump announces lawsuits against Facebook and Twitter, immediately starts fundraising off it
businessinsider.com
Trump Is Suing Big Tech
newser.com
Trump's meritless lawsuits don't stand a chance
edition.cnn.com
READ IT: Trump lawsuits against Twitter, Facebook, Google over alleged big tech censorship
foxnews.com
Trump to the rescue! Sues Big Tech
wnd.com
'Big tech is out of control': Trump announces lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter and Google
msnbc.com
Jesse Watters on Trump’s lawsuit against Big Tech: Hunter Biden, Wuhan lab stories were 'suppressed'
foxnews.com
'Punitive damages': Trump goes to war with Big Tech, leads class-action suit
wnd.com
Trump Says He’s Suing CEOs of Facebook, Twitter and Google Over Social Media Bans
thewrap.com
Dershowitz: Trump’s Big Tech Lawsuit ‘Will Shake Things Up Considerably’
breitbart.com
Trump expected to announce lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter
pressherald.com
Trump Is Suing Big Tech Giants That Nuked His Accounts
thefederalist.com
Source: Trump plans lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter
abc7news.com
Trump announces lawsuits against Twitter, Facebook, and Google
washingtontimes.com
Trump files lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter and Google
thehill.com
Trump files class action lawsuits against tech giants
cbsnews.com
Source: Trump plans lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter
lasvegassun.com
Trump’s Fantasy Legal World
theatlantic.com
Donald Trump Speech Live: Former President Speaking on First Amendment in New Jersey
newsweek.com

 

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1.2
Judge rules Air Force mostly responsible for Texas church shooting
(17.99/48)

July 7 (UPI) -- A federal judge on Wednesday ruled that the U. S. Air Force was largely responsible for the November 2017 mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Judge Xavier Rodriguez said the Air Force "proximately caused the deaths and injuries" of the shooting victims as it failed to alert the FBI that gunman Devin Kelley could not legally purchase a firearm after he was investigated and court-martialed for assaulting his then-wife and her stepson on an Air Force base. "The court concludes that the government failed to exercise reasonable care in its undertaking to submit criminal history to the FBI," Rodriguez wrote in the civil case brought by families of the victims. "The government's failure to exercise reasonable care increased the risk of physical harm to the general public, including plaintiffs." Rodriguez ruled that the Air Force bore 60% of the responsibility for the shooting due to its failures, while 40% lay with Kelley himself. "The evidence shows that -- had the government done its job and properly reported Kelley's information into the background check system -- it is more likely than not that Kelley would have been deterred from carrying out the church shooting," he wrote. Kelley killed 26 people, including several children and a pregnant woman in the Nov.5,2017, shooting at First Baptist Church near San Antonio and led two civilians on a high-speed chase before he was found dead with multiple gunshot wounds, including a self-inflicted one to the head. Kelley joined the Air Force in 2010 and served in New Mexico before he was discharged for abuse of his wife and stepson and sentenced to 12 months in prison. A court filing showed that Air Force Investigators found a "long history of violence and abuse" during the investigation into the domestic assault allegations including that Kelley "threatened to kill both (his wife) and Air Force Security Forces" if she reported the abuse to authorities. Kelley's wife also told investigators he threatened to commit a mass shooting at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. Court filings showed Kelley later remarried and abused his second wife. A day after the shooting, the Air Force said a review of its procedures showed that it failed to enter the domestic violence conviction into the federal background check database and a watchdog review in 2018 found the service failed on six occasions to notify the FBI of his domestic abuse record. Last month, the Supreme Court ruled that the store that sold Kelley the assault style weapon used in the shooting could not be sued due to the Air Force's failure to flag the assault conviction.
Judge: Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Texas church attack
chron.com
Judge rules Air Force responsible for 2017 mass shooting at Texas church
thehill.com
Federal judge faults US Air Force over gunman's history for Texas church attack that killed more than two dozen people
abcnews.go.com
US Government 60 Percent Responsible for 2017 Mass Shooting in Texas: Judge
theepochtimes.com
Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Sutherland Springs church shooting in Texas, judge says
abc7news.com
Air Force Failed to Notify FBI 6 Times of Felony Convictions for 2017 Texas Church Shooter
newsweek.com
Judge: Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Texas church attack
wtop.com
Court finds US Air Force 60% responsible for Sutherland Springs, Texas, shooting
abcnews.go.com
Judge: Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Texas church attack
abcnews.go.com
Judge Says The Air Force Is Mostly Responsible For A 2017 Texas Church Shooting
npr.org
Federal judge largely faults Air Force for 2017 Texas church shooting
edition.cnn.com
Judge: Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Texas church attack
wral.com
Air Force 60% responsible for 2017 Texas church shooting, judge rules
nydailynews.com
Judge Rules Air Force ‘60% Responsible’ For Texas Church Shooting That Killed 26
dailycaller.com
Federal judge finds Air Force ‘60% responsible’ for 2017 Texas church massacre
nypost.com
Judge rules Air Force responsible for 2017 mass shooting at church
wnd.com
Judge: Air Force Was 60% Responsible for Mass Shooting
newser.com
Judge: Air Force mostly at fault in 2017 Texas church attack
washingtontimes.com
Air Force Is Most to Blame for 2017 Church Shooting, Judge Rules
nytimes.com

 

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99.4
Teen who filmed George Floyd's death says uncle killed in car crash with Minneapolis police
(14.99/48)

The teen who filmed the murder of George Floyd by former police officer Derek Chauvin said that her uncle was killed Tuesday in a fatal car crash involving Minneapolis police. In a Facebook post,18-year-old Darnella Frazier said her uncle Leneal Lamont Frazier died after police collided with his car while they were chasing a carjacked vehicle. Officials from the Minneapolis Office of Police Information said the driver of the stolen car was involved in several robberies and refused to stop for police. “Minneapolis police killed my uncle,” Darnella Frazier said in the post. “Another black man lost his life in the hands of the police… I couldn’t accept what I was hearing and still can’t. Some things just take time to process.” The fatal collision took place at the intersection of 41st Avenue North and Lyndale Avenue North in Minneapolis, according to police. A third car was also caught up in the collision. Minneapolis Office of Police Information officials said that both the driver of the uninvolved car and the officer were taken to the hospital, where the driver died shortly after. The officer was treated for non-life-threatening injuries. In a statement, the Minnesota State Patrol said it will lead the investigation into the crash. It is an open and active investigation, and once completed, the state patrol said it will turn its findings over to the county attorney for review. In her social media post, Darnella Frazier described her final moments with her uncle, saying Minneapolis police is responsible for the family’s “big loss.” “I was just with you at the beach,” she wrote. “If I would’ve known that would be my last time seeing you, I would’ve hugged you so much longer, told you ‘I love you’ way harder.” During the Chauvin murder trial, the teen took to the witness stand to recount the pain she said she has experienced since witnessing Floyd’s murder. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter and was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison for Floyd’s death. Frazier, who was 17 at the time of the incident, told prosecutors in March that she continues to harbor a lot of guilt and trauma. “When I look at George Floyd, I look at my dad, I look at my brothers, I look at my cousins, my uncles because they are all Black,” she told prosecutors. “And I look at that and I look at how that could have been one of them. I stayed up [at night] apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting, not saving his life."
Darnella Frazier, Teen Who Filmed George Floyd Murder, Says Uncle Killed By Minneapolis Police
forbes.com
Teen who recorded Floyd’s arrest loses uncle in police crash
wtop.com
'Police Go Around Killing People': Darnella Frazier Decries Uncle Leneal's Death
newsweek.com
Bystander Killed in Police Crash Is Uncle of Teen Who Filmed George Floyd’s Death
nytimes.com
Teen Who Filmed Floyd's Murder Has Distressing News
newser.com
Ben Crump: Blacks have always had a price. Floyd case brought new era of accountability.
usatoday.com
Teen who recorded Floyd’s arrest loses uncle in police crash
washingtontimes.com
Uncle of Darnella Frazier, teen who filmed George Floyd's murder, killed in Minneapolis police car crash
cbsnews.com
Uncle of Darnella Frazier, teen who filmed George Floyd's murder, killed in crash with Minneapolis police
usatoday.com
Teen who recorded George Floyd’s arrest loses uncle in police crash
twincities.com
Teen who recorded Floyd's arrest loses uncle in police crash
abcnews.go.com
Darnella Frazier, teen who recorded George Floyd’s murder, says uncle killed by Minneapolis police car chasing suspect
nydailynews.com
Ben Crump: Black lives have always had a price. Floyd case brought new accountability.
usatoday.com
Charges being reviewed in fatal police shooting of Ohio teen Ma’Khia Bryant
nydailynews.com
Darnella Frazier's uncle died in crash involving Minneapolis police, she says
edition.cnn.com
Teen who recorded George Floyd video says uncle killed in crash during police pursuit
foxnews.com
First George Floyd, now her uncle: Darnella Frazier grieves another Black man killed by police
usatoday.com
Teen who filmed George Floyd murder says uncle killed in collision with police
thehill.com
Teen who recorded Floyd's arrest loses uncle in police crash
wral.com

 

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1.2
Florida building collapse lawsuits already piling up
(10.99/48)

Lawyers for 20 families impacted by the collapse of a beachfront condo building in Florida were in court for the first time Wednesday — as court officials brace for a mountain of claims over the deadly incident. The officials expect negligence and wrongful death lawsuits to pile up following the collapse of Champlain Tower South in Surfside and one judge has been assigned to be a “gatekeeper,” WPLG-TV reported. The judge on Wednesday urged the slew of attorneys to pick someone to lead the pack. “I got the best of the bar here but not everybody can have a leadership role and the faster you all realize that and try to reach some consensus, the faster we can move this along and try to get the victims some compensation,” Circuit Judge Michael Hanzman told the lawyers lined up before him. Hanzman said the doomed building’s $48 million insurance coverage will likely fall far short of compensating victims of the collapse, in which 46 people have been confirmed dead and 94 remain missing. “There’s not a sufficient amount of money in the world that can compensate for this,” the judge said, according to WPLG. Most of the lawyers are volunteering their services, the station said. “This is kind of an unprecedented kind of thing where everybody’s really on the same page just to try and help what we can do,” said attorney Brad Sohn. The first suit was filed about 22 hours after the June 24 partial collapse of the building, a $5 million class-action claim from condo owner Manuel Drezner. Drezner claimed that the condo association failed to “properly protect the lives and property” of himself and “others similarly situated.” Others have followed, including a claim by the children of Harold Rosenberg, who was missing in the rubble, seeking permission to fly a drone over the site. Also suing is Raysa Rodriguez, who escaped the tower with neighbors after the partial collapse and captured the harrowing experience in an audio recording. “The court obviously needs to be a gatekeeper and administer things and ensure that obviously there aren’t 100 separate lawsuits in 100 different divisions of this courthouse,” attorney Jorge Silva, who represents several families, told WPLG on Wednesday. “So, it all needs to be streamlined and that’s a beautiful job that Judge Hanzman is doing,” Silva said. The Champlain condo association has declined to comment on pending litigation.
Watch Live: Officials give update on Florida condo building collapse
cbsnews.com
Building collapse lawsuits seek to get answers, assign blame
chron.com
Death toll in Florida building collapse jumps to 46
nypost.com
‘Zero chance’ of finding survivors in collapsed Florida building -officials
newsinfo.inquirer.net
Sisters in Florida condo collapse buried in same coffin
foxnews.com
Multiple lawsuits filed in connection with Florida condo collapse
cbsnews.com
8 more dead pulled from rubble of collapsed Florida condo
wtop.com
Florida building collapse work shifts to recovery operation
nypost.com
Young sisters killed in Florida building collapse buried in same casket
nydailynews.com
8 more bodies pulled from rubble of collapsed Florida condo building
myfox8.com
8 more dead pulled from rubble of collapsed Florida condo
washingtontimes.com
8 more dead pulled from rubble of collapsed Florida condo
lasvegassun.com
Death toll rises again in Florida condo collapse
usatoday.com

 

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0.5
Britney Spears' Conservator Won't Step Aside; Lynne Spears Asks Court to Allow Daughter to Hire Own Attorney
(10.99/48)

Britney Spears’ court-appointed conservator told the court on Wednesday that she has been getting death threats ever since Spears spoke out against the conservatorship last month. Jodi Montgomery asked the court to allow Spears’ conservatorship estate to pay for the cost of round-the-clock security at Montgomery’s home. In the motion, Montgomery also said Spears wants her to remain as the conservator of Spears’ “person,” and that Montgomery will not be resigning. “Since Ms. Spears has requested that Petitioner retain her position as conservator, Petitioner has no intention of abandoning her by resigning because of these threats,” Montgomery’s attorneys wrote. They also included text messages from Spears to Montgomery, in which Spears wrote: “I need u to stay as my co conservator of person. I’m asking u for ur assistance in getting a new attorney. Thank u for ur help.” Spears denounced the conservatorship in a public hearing on June 23, calling it abusive and asking Judge Brenda Penny to end it. She said she had been barred from seeing a doctor to have an IUD removed, and that her family — in particular her father — had wielded undue control over her life and her finances. Since then, there has been some confusion over when Spears might file a motion to end the conservatorship. Her court-appointed attorney, Samuel Ingham, filed his resignation from the case on Tuesday. Spears’ manager, Larry Rudolph, also announced over the holiday weekend that he would no longer be representing Spears, given that she intends to retire from performing. In a filing on Tuesday, Spears’ mother, Lynne Spears, asked the judge to “listen to the wishes of her daughter,” and allow Spears to hire her own private attorney. Lynne Spears’ attorney said such a move would be “a first step.” “It is self-evident that before the Court addresses, for example, the termination of the conservatorship, Conservatee must be allowed to consult with counsel of her choosing,” Lynne Spears’ attorney wrote. “Clearly, Conservatee needs private counsel to advise her as to her basic rights in this conservatorship.” Montgomery stated that she has received threats throughout the case, but that the amount and the severity of the threats increased dramatically after the June 23 hearing. She said she was advised to get 24/7 security for at least a couple of months, and she provided an estimate that it would cost $25,000 every two weeks. The conservatorship estate, overseen by Jamie Spears, has been covering the cost. But Jamie Spears’ attorneys have also said they need a court order to allow the payments to continue, and that if the court denies the request, Montgomery would be personally liable for the expense.
Britney Spears’ Mom Lynne Petitions for Daughter to Hire Her Own Lawyer — and More — Amid Conservatorship Battle
usmagazine.com
Britney Spears' mom Lynne speaks out after longtime lawyer asks to quit in conservatorship case
usatoday.com
Britney Spears’ mom Lynne intervenes, asks that star be able to hire lawyer
pagesix.com
Britney Spears' mom Lynne asks court to allow singer to hire her 'own private' lawyer
foxnews.com
Britney Spears Sent Jodi Montgomery A Text Asking Her To Stay On As Conservator – Court Docs
hollywoodlife.com
Report: Britney Spears’ Mom Asks Judge For Daughter’s Right To Hire Private Lawyer In Conservatorship Battle
dailycaller.com
Britney Spears' Attorney Steps Down From Conservatorship
thefederalist.com
Britney Spears' court-appointed attorney to resign; Conservator Jodi Montgomery says singer asked her to "continue to serve"
cbsnews.com
Lynne Spears petitions court to allow Britney Spears to choose her own attorney
edition.cnn.com
Lynne Spears Asks Judge to Appoint Private Lawyer for Britney to End Conservatorship
tmz.com

 

 7 /113 

0.4
Britney Spears’ Mom Supports Goal To Hire Own Lawyer & Says Singer Can ‘Care For Her Own Person’
(8.88/48)

Britney Spears ‘ mom, Lynne Spears, is supporting the pop star in her ongoing conservatorship battle. In court documents filed on July 6 and obtained by HollywoodLife, Lynne,66, requested that Britney,39, be allowed to hire her own private lawyer — something she is currently unable to do under her strict conservatorship. Lynne’s lawyer said that the “Toxic” crooner, who is currently seeking to get her own lawyer and end her conservatorship, is “able to care for her person” and has been capable of doing so “for the past many years.” In the court docs, Lynne’s lawyer noted many of Britney’s accomplishments over the past 13 years under the conservatorship, such as performing in concerts and preparing choreography for her shows, as a means of showing that the superstar can make her own decisions. The lawyer also said that of all of Britney’s demands in her June 23 court hearing, being able to hire her own private lawyer or, as an alternative, have the court appoint a lawyer of Britney’s choosing, should be made priority. Per the docs, Lynne has requested a July 14 hearing to likely hash out her daughter’s ongoing legal debacle. Lynne’s decision to back her daughter’s wishes comes after she opened up to journalists Ronan Farrow and Jia Tolentino in a July 3 report from The New Yorker about Britney’s conservatorship. “I got mixed feelings about everything,” Lynne told the outlet. “I don’t know what to think… It’s a lot of pain, a lot of worry,” she added. The article also claimed that Britney called the emergency line to report herself as a victim of “abuse” in her conservatorship, according to unnamed sourced in Ventura County law enforcement and a close friend of Brit’s. Britney has been under a conservatorship since 2008, but on June 23, she spoke in front of a judge and requested that the conservatorship be terminated without her having to be psychologically evaluated. When she addressed the court, Britney compared her father Jamie Spears to a “sex trafficker” who “loved” having control over her. Britney also said during the 30 minute appearance that she wished to “sue” her family and claimed that she was unable to “get married and have a baby” due to the conservatorship. Britney had previously requested for Jamie to be removed as co-conservator of her estate, even if it remained in place, but a judge denied it. Now, Britney wants to fully end the conservatorship, which includes removing Jodi Montgomery from her post as Britney’s personal conservator. However, Britney hasn’t yet filed the necessary paperwork required to end her conservatorship since she spoke in court. Another hearing in this case is set for mid-July.
Britney Spears Conservator says Singer Demands Lawyer of her Choice
tmz.com
Britney Spears’ Mom Lynne Petitions for Daughter to Hire Her Own Lawyer — and More — Amid Conservatorship Battle
usmagazine.com
Britney Spears' mom Lynne speaks out after longtime lawyer asks to quit in conservatorship case
usatoday.com
Britney Spears’ mom Lynne intervenes, asks that star be able to hire lawyer
pagesix.com
Britney Spears' mom Lynne asks court to allow singer to hire her 'own private' lawyer
foxnews.com
Britney Spears’ Mom Is Reportedly Helping Her Find A Private Lawyer To End Her Conservatorship
uproxx.com
Report: Britney Spears’ Mom Asks Judge For Daughter’s Right To Hire Private Lawyer In Conservatorship Battle
dailycaller.com
Britney Spears Can Care For Herself And Should Pick Her Own Lawyer, Mother Says
forbes.com

 

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1.4
On This Day: Dallas shooting leaves five officers dead
(7.99/48)

July 7 (UPI) -- On this date in history: In 1846, U. S. Navy Commodore J. D. Sloat proclaimed the annexation of California by the United States. In 1865, four people convicted of conspiring with John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of U. S. President Abraham Lincoln were hanged in Washington. In 1898, U. S. President William McKinley signed a joint resolution of Congress authorizing the annexation of Hawaii by the United States. In 1930, construction began on the Giant Boulder Dam, which in 1947 was renamed the Hoover Dam. In 1946, Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917) became the first American to be canonized a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. In 1976, the U. S. Military Academy at West Point in New York enrolled female cadets for the first time in the institution's then-174-year-old history. In 1981, Sandra Day O'Connor was chosen by U. S. President Ronald Reagan to become the first woman on the U. S. Supreme Court. She was unanimously approved by the Senate. In 1999, a Miami-Dade County jury held the leading tobacco companies liable for various illnesses of Florida smokers. The class-action lawsuit, filed in 1994, was the first of its kind to reach trial. In 2005, terrorists struck the London transit system, setting off explosions in three subway cars and a double-decker bus in coordinated rush-hour attacks. Fifty-two people were killed and more than 700 injured. In 2010, a Paris court sentenced former Panama ruler Manuel Noriega to seven years in prison for money laundering. He was convicted of funneling about $3 million of Colombian drug money into French bank accounts. In 2012, U. S. Rep. Barney Frank of Massachusetts married his longtime partner, Jim Ready, in a ceremony officiated by Gov. Deval Patrick. He was the first member of Congress to publicly come out as gay and first to marry a same-sex partner while in office. In 2013, Andy Murray became the first British player in 77 years to win the men's singles title at Wimbledon, defeating Serb Novak Djokovic in straight sets in the championship match. In 2016, a gunman opened fire at an otherwise peaceful Black Lives Matter rally in Dallas, killing four police officers and one transit officer, and injuring seven others. Police killed the gunmen, who was holed up in a parking garage, using a robot strapped with an explosive. In 2017, Elon Musk's Tesla Motors produced its first mass-market vehicle, the Model 3. In 2020, the Trump administration sent formal notice to Congress and the United Nations that the United States was withdrawing from the World Health Organization over its handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and China's role in it. Newly inaugurated President Joe Biden reversed the withdrawal in one of his first acts as leader in January 2021.
Man is sought in father's fatal shooting in Rialto
latimes.com
Indiana police officer fatally shot outside federal building
wtop.com
Three undercover officers shot on Chicago's South Side
thehill.com
Indiana police officer fatally shot outside federal building
abcnews.go.com
Police: 3 Undercover Officers Shot, Wounded in Chicago
theepochtimes.com
Man fatally shot in suburban Lansing
chicago.suntimes.com
Police: 3 undercover officers shot, wounded in Chicago
lasvegassun.com
Police: 3 undercover officers shot, wounded in Chicago
abcnews.go.com

 

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0.3
Britney Spears' Testimony Fallout Continues With Resignation of Lawyer
(7.79/48)

The fallout from Britney Spears' testimony continued on Tuesday as her lawyer announced that he wanted to resign. Samuel D. Ingham III came in for criticism after Spears told a Los Angeles court on June 23 that, under the conservatorship controlling her financial and personal affairs, she had not been able to choose her own legal counsel. "I would personally like to—actually, I've grown a personal relationship with Sam, my lawyer. I've been talking to him like three times a week now, we've kind of built a relationship, but I haven't really had the opportunity by my own self to actually handpick my own lawyer by myself," the 39-year-old told the judge, Brenda Penny. "And I would like to be able to do that." In a court filing submitted on Tuesday, Ingham said he intended to resign as soon as the court could appoint another lawyer for Spears. Ingram was appointed to represent her in 2008, when the conservatorship was set up. The singer's father, Jamie Spears, has handled most of her affairs since then, but she wants this to change. After her testimony in June, questions were raised about why she did not know she would have to file a petition to end the arrangement. "Ma'am, I didn't know I could petition the conservatorship to end it. I'm sorry for my ignorance, but I honestly didn't know that," Spears said. The attorney's decision to quit came just a day after the pop star's manager, Larry Rudolph, announced his resignation. The wealth management firm involved in her conservatorship also wants to withdraw from its role. "Earlier today, I became aware that Britney had been voicing her intention to officially retire." He added: "As her manager, I believe it is in Britney's best interest for me to resign from her team as my professional services are no longer needed." Wealth management firm Bessemer Trust, which had been appointed as co-conservator in Spears' case, filed a petition last week asking to resign. The filing cited her wish for the conservatorship to end.
Britney Spears Conservator says Singer Demands Lawyer of her Choice
tmz.com
Britney Spears' Lawyer Wants Out
newser.com
Britney Spears’ mom Lynne intervenes, asks that star be able to hire lawyer
pagesix.com
Britney Spears' court-appointed lawyer resigns from her conservatorship
abc7chicago.com
Britney Spears Can Care For Herself And Should Pick Her Own Lawyer, Mother Says
forbes.com
Britney Spears' court-appointed attorney to resign; Conservator Jodi Montgomery says singer asked her to "continue to serve"
cbsnews.com
Britney Spears' manager and lawyer both quit in fallout from explosive testimony
news24.com

 

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1.3
Shooting of star Dutch reporter raises European concern
(5.65/48)

AMSTERDAM (AP) — European leaders and lawmakers expressed dismay Wednesday and rights advocates demanded justice after a veteran Dutch crime reporter was shot in the head in downtown Amsterdam following a TV appearance. Peter R. de Vries, a journalist celebrated for his courageous reporting on the Dutch underworld, was fighting for his life in an Amsterdam hospital after the Tuesday night shooting. Two suspects remained in custody Wednesday, while a third person detained Tuesday night was let go, according to a Dutch police statement. The motive for the attack was not disclosed. Supporters brought flowers to the crime scene, still cordoned off by police. The shooting shocked the Netherlands and prompted outrage from top Dutch officials, but it also struck a chord elsewhere in Europe, where such attacks are rare and where the killings of journalists in Slovakia and Malta in recent years raised concerns about reporters’ safety in developed, democratic societies. “We might disagree with a lot we see in our media, but we have to agree that journalists investigating potential abuses of power are not a threat but an asset to our democracies and our societies,” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen told European Parliament lawmakers Wednesday. European Council President Charles Michel called the shooting “a crime against our fundamental value of freedom of the press.” De Vries,64, had long been considered a possible target of the criminals he doggedly reported on. Police and prosecutors declined to comment on whether he received police protection. De Vries won an International Emmy in 2008 for a television show he made about the disappearance of U. S. teenager Natalee Holloway while she was on holiday in the Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba in 2005. Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders expressed “full solidarity” with de Vries’ family and all Dutch journalists on Wednesday, and called for those responsible for the shooting to be brought to justice. The commissioner for human rights at the Council of Europe, Dunja Mijatović, tweeted, “Everything should be done to bring perpetrator(s) and mastermind(s) of this horrific crime to justice and ensure #SafetyOfJournalists in #Europe.” Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
Dutch crime reporter De Vries fighting for his life after shooting
edition.cnn.com
Dutch crime reporter fighting for his life after shooting
independent.ie
Shooting of star Dutch reporter raises European concern
abcnews.go.com
Dutch crime reporter's shooting ‘nightmare come true’ - son
independent.ie
Shooting of Dutch Crime Reporter Peter R de Vries is 'an Attack on Our Values', EU's Michel Says
sputniknews.com
Dutch crime reporter De Vries fighting for his life after shooting
edition.cnn.com
Dutch crime reporter Peter R. de Vries fighting for his life after shooting
edition.cnn.com
Famed Dutch crime reporter shot in head
foxnews.com

 

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0.1
Judge Strikes Down Challenge To New Georgia Voting Restrictions
(5.53/48)

A federal judge on Tuesday denied a request to block new Georgia voting restrictions from being enforced, delivering a major blow to voting rights advocates in the first court ruling concerning the Georgia law. "We are at the juncture where all of the challenged provisions are already the law," Boulee said. "Therefore, an injunction would not merely preserve the status quo; rather, it would change the law in the ninth inning." Numerous states with Republican-led legislatures have passed new voting restrictions this year following former President Donald Trump's repeated false claims that widespread voter fraud kept him from winning the 2020 presidential election. But few of the laws have proven as controversial as Georgia's, which came in a state President Joe Biden only carried by about 12,000 votes. Critics have claimed the new law amounts to voter suppression, specifically against Black communities, through measures like prohibiting non-poll workers from handing out water to voters waiting in line. Pressure from activists has also led to corporate backlash against the state. Major League Baseball moved its All-Star Game out of Atlanta this year, while hundreds of companies —including Georgia giants like Coca-Cola and Delta—have denounced the law. 8. That's how many lawsuits have been filed to challenge the Georgia law, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Lawsuit seeks to stop local election takeovers in Georgia voting law (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution) Will Smith Movie ‘Emancipation’ Leaving Georgia Over Voting Restrictions—See Full Boycott List (Forbes) Stacey Abrams-Founded Group Sues Georgia Over ‘Voter Suppression Bill’ (Forbes) Sweeping Georgia Voting Restrictions Signed Into Law (Forbes) Judge Denies Request To Force MLB All-Star Game Back To Atlanta (Forbes)
Federal judge blocks effort to invalidate parts of new Georgia voting law ahead of July runoffs
edition.cnn.com
Judge allows enforcement of Georgia’s new election law for upcoming runoffs
washingtontimes.com
Lifetime tenure for Supreme Court justices hypes partisanship
upi.com
Federal Judge Rejects Challenge to Georgia Voting Law
theepochtimes.com
Judge rules in favor of new Georgia voting law
upi.com
A federal judge declines, for now, to block parts of Georgia’s voting law.
nytimes.com

 

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0.7
DOJ: More than 535 charged for Capitol siege
(5.39/48)

July 7 (UPI) -- The Justice Department said it has charged more than 535 people in connection to the Jan.6 assault on the U. S. Capitol building. The department made the announcement Tuesday, exactly six months after supporters of then-President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol in an effort to prevent Congress from certifying the presidential election win of Joe Biden, resulting in five deaths, more than 140 police injured and $1.5 million in damages to the building. Since the siege, authorities have been on the hunt for those responsible, and the Justice Department said in a statement the more than 500 defendants charged come from nearly all 50 states. "This works out to be an average of about three defendants arrested every single day, including weekends, since Jan.6," it said. Of those arrested,495 were charged with entering or remaining in a restricted federal building or grounds and 235 were charged with corruptly obstructing, influencing or impeding an official proceeding. At least 165 were charged with assaulting, resisting or impeding officers including 50 who face charges of using a deadly or dangerous weapon or causing serious bodily injury to an officer, it said. Six people were charged with assaulting members of the media and some 40 face conspiracy charges. Only 10 have so far entered plea deals, it said. The Department said they are still asking for the public's help in identifying 300 others suspected of participating in the siege including 200 who are accused of assaulting members of law enforcement. The FBI on Tuesday released 11 new videos of the Capitol siege in hopes the public will help them identify more suspects. "As we mark six months since the violence at our nation's Capitol we continue to encourage the public to send tips to the FBI," Steven D'Antuono, assistant director in charge of the FBI's Washington Field Office, said in a statement . "As we have seen with dozens of cases so far, tips matter." President Joe Biden called those who attacked the Capitol "insurrectionists" in a statement Tuesday, saying the attack "posed an existential crisis and a test of whether our democracy could survive." "While it shocked and saddened the nation and the world, six months later, we can say unequivocally that democracy did prevail -- and that we must all continue to work to protect and preserve it," he said.
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
wral.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
DOJ charges Capitol riot suspect with attacking AP photographer
edition.cnn.com
Donald Trump Speech Live: Former President Speaking on First Amendment in New Jersey
newsweek.com
Over 535 Charged 6 Months After Jan.6 Capitol Breach: DOJ
theepochtimes.com

 

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0.2
U. S. promises not to imprison Julian Assange under harsh conditions if Britain extradites him.
(5.33/48)

If a British court permits the extradition of the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to face criminal charges in the United States, the Biden administration has pledged that it will not hold him under the most austere conditions reserved for high-security prisoners and that, if he is convicted, it will let him serve his sentence in his native Australia. Those assurances were disclosed on Wednesday as part of a British High Court ruling in London. The court accepted the United States government’s appeal of a ruling that had denied its extradition request for Mr. Assange — who was indicted during the Trump administration — on the grounds that American prison conditions for the highest-security inmates were inhumane. The new ruling was not made public in its entirety. But in an email, the Crown Prosecution Service press office provided a summary showing that the High Court had accepted three of five grounds for appeal submitted by the United States and disclosing the promises the Biden administration had made. A lower-court judge, Vanessa Baraitser of the Westminster Magistrates’ Court, had held in January that “the mental condition of Mr. Assange is such that it would be oppressive to extradite him to the United States” given American prison conditions. The summary of the decision to accept the appeal said that the United States had “provided the United Kingdom with a package of assurances which are responsive to the district judge’s specific findings in this case.” Specifically, it said, Mr. Assange would not be subjected to measures that curtail a prisoner’s contact with the outside world and can amount to solitary confinement, and would not be imprisoned at the supermax prison in Florence, Colo., unless he later did something “that meets the test” for imposing such harsh steps. “The United States has also provided an assurance that the United States will consent to Mr. Assange being transferred to Australia to serve any custodial sentence imposed on him,” the summary said. No hearing date has been set. The Crown Prosecution Service and the United States Justice Department declined to comment. In a statement, Stella Moris, Mr. Assange’s fiancée, urged the Biden administration to instead drop the extradition request and abandon the charges, which she portrayed as a threat to First Amendment press freedoms. “I am appealing directly to the Biden government to do the right thing, even at this late stage,” she said. “This case should not be dragged out for a moment longer. End this prosecution, protect free speech and let Julian come home to his family.” The case against Mr. Assange is complex and developed over the course of three indictments secured by prosecutors during the Trump administration. It centers on his 2010 publication of diplomatic and military files leaked by Chelsea Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst — not on his publication during the 2016 election of Democratic emails stolen by Russia. Prosecutors have made two sets of accusations. One is that Mr. Assange participated in a criminal hacking conspiracy, both by offering to help Ms. Manning mask her tracks on a secure computer network and by engaging in a broader effort to encourage hackers to obtain secret material and send it to WikiLeaks. The other is that his soliciting and publishing information the government had deemed secret violated the Espionage Act. While hacking is not a journalistic act, the second set of charges has alarmed press-freedom advocates because it could establish a precedent that such journalistic-style activities may be treated as a crime in the United States — a separate question from whether Mr. Assange himself counts as a journalist. In January, Judge Baraitser rejected the Trump administration’s extradition request on the grounds that Mr. Assange might be driven to suicide by American prison conditions. On Jan.19, in one of its last acts, the Trump administration filed an appeal of that ruling. Soon after taking office, the Biden administration pressed forward.
UK court allows US to appeal denial of Assange's extradition
abcnews.go.com
US Assures Assange He Will Not Be Held in Maximum Security if Extradited - Reports
sputniknews.com
WikiLeaks: US Receives 'Limited Permission' to Appeal UK Judge Decision Not to Extradite Assange
sputniknews.com
UK court allows US to appeal denial of Assange’s extradition
wtop.com
UK Court Allows US to Appeal Denial of Assange's Extradition
theepochtimes.com
US Promises Not To Hold Julian Assange In Supermax Prison If Extradited
dailycaller.com

 

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0.4
Why Every Couple From 'Love Island' US Has Broken Up
(4.34/48)

TV & Movies Here’s why they all broke up. Entering into a relationship on reality TV is always a gamble, as the couples of Love Island US know all too well. Since filming ended, not a single couple from either of the show’s two seasons has stayed together, though some former contestants have at least remained friends. Here's what we know about their breakups. Season 1 winners Elizabeth and Zac were smitten with one another in 2019, but the busy realities of life soon got in the way. “I think I can speak for everyone from the cast. We came back and just kind of had a hard time adjusting,” Elizabeth told Bustle in August 2020. “And then COVID hitting didn't make anything easier.” The pair decided to separate in December 2019, four months after winning the show. "We're friends. We check in on each other here and there,” she added. As Zac explained in an Instagram Story, he and Elizabeth “wanted different things and it wasn't fair to either of us to continue on a path that no longer served either of us or our differing interests." Based on their social media posts, both parties are still single now. Alex and Dylan's relationship was thrown "into real life, real quick when Alex broke her jaw shortly after returning home. “He was amazing with me when I broke my jaw, [but] that kind of takes a huge toll on people," Alex told Bustle in August 2019. "It's just not something normal.” By November of the same year, the two had decided that they were better off as friends. Per E!, Alex wrote in an Instagram story that " heartbreak is hard, and that while her relationship with Dylan “was a Fairytale romance for me, sometimes things just don't work out." Dylan appears to be single and spends a lot of his time by the ocean. Alex also seems to be single. “If she’s drinking a spicy marg before 12 pm on a weekday, just focus on yourself my guy,” she wrote in a June 30 Instagram post. Kyra and Cashel's relationship in the villa was messy, and it only got messier at home. Kyra alleged to Bustle in August 2019 that both she and Cashel cheated on each other. Cashel, however, called the claim "news to me." The two ultimately parted ways in December 2019. "I didn't trust him. He didn't trust me," Kyra said. "It just kind of spiraled after that." Per Looper, Kyra and Cashel have since unfollowed each other on Instagram and have been working on their respective modeling careers. Cashel was in a relationship with a woman named Alexandra Karacozoff for a while, but it’s unclear if they’re still dating as their last photo together is from September 2020. Kyra appears to be single, but proudly shared several Pride-centric photos on Instagram last month; she also recently partnered with a women’s sex toy brand. Caro and Ray were the couple to last the longest after Love Island, but Caro ended their long-distance relationship in June 2020. “I just don’t feel like he was committed to the relationship like I was,” she said in an announcement on her YouTube channel . “So that’s why I decided to break up with him.” Ray, however, told Bustle that he doesn't fear commitment — Caro simply didn't favor his flourishing social life. “I guess she likes someone who will give her more attention,” he explained. “Based off her past experiences and what she's been through in her life, it's very difficult, you know, me being very friendly. I have a lot of female friends as well... and that was always an issue for her.” Still, Ray has "no bad blood" with Caro and hopes that they can reconnect one day as friends. Both Caro and Ray appear to be single and working on separate modeling gigs; Ray has paid partnerships with companies like SmartWater, while Caro is a Fashion Nova partner. The least promising couple in Season 1, Weston and Emily dated for a little while before moving on. They didn't publicly announce their breakup, but Emily wrote in a Valentine's Day Instagram post that she was spending the holiday "falling in love with myself." Currently, they both appear to be single. Season 2 winners Justine and Caleb were close when they left the show in October 2020, but by December they had parted ways. In a tweet, Caleb explained that they met up for a brand deal in December that Justine was very excited about “that happened to include me.” They meant to publicly announce their breakup when that content dropped in December, but things got delayed until January. The two eventually broke the news of their split on Jan.16,2021. "It’s truly a strange feeling to be typing this out but I understand my reality is now having to share some aspects of my life with you all regardless of how private I’d like to remain at times," Justine wrote in an Instagram statement . "This is extremely difficult for me to express but out of respect for those of you who supported me, and rode for me, I want you to know that Caleb and I are no longer together." Per Entertainment Tonight, Caleb shared his own Instagram statement wherein he wished Justine "the absolute best and much continued success” and asked fans to give them some privacy. Season 2 runners-up Cely and Johnny also ended their relationship in December 2020. Though Cely announced the breakup in a Jan.9 tweet, she explained in a later YouTube video that she and Johnny parted ways over the holidays. They went on a Christmas trip to Hawaii together, but “it didn’t work out. I came home early, and he stayed,” she explained. Though Johnny accused Cely of misleading fans about why their relationship ended, Cely said in the YouTube video that she’s focused on looking forward. “I’m trying my hardest to not be associated with that relationship anymore,” she said. “I have honestly moved on, and I’m encouraging everybody else to move on with me.” Moira and Calvin found their way back together after separating during Casa Amor, but their relationship didn’t last long after leaving the villa in October 2020. In a November Instagram Story, Moira announced that they had decided to part ways. "After the show, when we left Las Vegas and went back to the real world, our plan was to take it day by day," she told People on Nov.23. She added that her relationship with Calvin was really a “situationship,” and that the time they spent together in the villa “really wasn't long enough — maybe like, two weeks or even less — to build a foundation for a relationship on the outside." Though Moira currently appears to be single based on her Instagram, she told People that she’s “ready for a boyfriend and ready for love. And if that means maybe getting my heart broken one more time to find the real thing, I'm open." Carrington was with Kaitlyn and Kierstan before pairing up with Laurel in the back half of Season 2. Coming in fourth place, the two dated for a little while but had also ended things by December 2020. Per ScreenRant, Carrington said in an Instagram Live with Johnny that he and Laurel "gave it an honest effort" after the show but things didn’t pan out. He added that they were just “talking” and “weren’t boyfriend and girlfriend.” Laurel is currently in a relationship with an entrepreneur named Bryce, while Carrington is dating Livy, a cheerleader at the University of Southern California. This article was originally published on Aug.25,2020
Scarborough to ‘Trumpists’: ‘America — Love It or Leave It’
breitbart.com
Love Island USA 2021 Schedule & Start Date
heavy.com
'Love Island' Release Schedule: When Season 3 of the U. S. Version Airs and How to Watch
newsweek.com
An intruder broke into the 'Love Island' villa
edition.cnn.com
Love Island USA Season 3 Live Stream: How to Watch Online
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Where To Follow All The New 'Love Island' US Singles On Instagram
bustle.com

 

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0.8
Hyderabad: Two arrested by Rachakonda police for identity theft
(4.32/48)

Hyderabad: The cyber crimes division of the Rachakonda police apprehended two men accused of identity theft and misusing credentials of a victim. The complainant stated that even though he had applied and obtained a GST number in 2017, he canceled it in March 2019, as he was disinclined to pursue business. However, while filing for Income tax returns in December 2020 he discovered that Rs.21,07,684 was the amount transacted to him from a company which he hadn’t heard of before. The victim also discovered that his PAN card was morphed with someone else’s photo and the same was used for opening bank accounts. Apprehensive about having to pay large sums of money under his income tax, he filed a complaint with the police. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the first accused, Syed Nissar Ahmed, an old friend of the victim collected the victim’s aadhar and pan card details when they agreed to start a business together. Based on this the accused obtained a work order for Akhiladeshwari Infra Project. But once the victim changed his mind about pursuing the business, the accused tied up with another man, Takur Achal Singh, and using the victim’s ID proof and other credentials, they obtained a new GST number. They also forged the pan card of the victim by replacing it with the photograph of Mr. Singh and opened bank accounts under Akhiladeswari Infra Projects in the victim’s name. They carried out business this way and ensured transactions by employing the victim’s identity via fraudulent means which resulted in suspicion transactions for the victim. The two accused were apprehended and their phones were seized. They were arrested on April 6 under Sections 417,419,420,468, and 471 of the Indian Penal Code and sections 66C and 66D of the IT Act. The accused are being produced for judicial custody shortly Get the news updates on WhatsApp & Telegram by subscribing to our channels. For all the latest Crime and Accident updates, download our app Android and iOS.
Spanish police arrest 2 for migrant tragedy in Atlantic
wtop.com
Spanish police arrest three over suspected homophobic killing
edition.cnn.com
Spanish police arrest three over suspected homophobic killing
edition.cnn.com
Woman Arrested Ordering McDonald’s During Police Chase
dailycaller.com
Spanish police arrest 2 for migrant tragedy in Atlantic
abcnews.go.com

 

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0.5
Capitol rioter busted for assault on cop, news photographer
(4.30/48)

A Pennsylvania man was charged Wednesday for attacking a police officer and a news photographer during the Jan.6 Capitol riot, federal authorities said. The suspect, Alan Byerly, was hit with a six-count federal criminal complaint that included assault on a federal officer and violent entry on Capitol grounds charges, prosecutors said. Byerly was allegedly one of a number of rioters who assaulted Associated Press photographer John Minchillo during the siege by supporters of former President Donald Trump, according to court docs. The suspect allegedly pushed and shoved the photographer, then dragged him down a set of stairs at the Capitol, according to the complaint. Byerly then grabbed him with both near his shoulders and upper neck and shoved him backwards, according to the court docs. Minchillo was rescued by a good Samaritan who escorted him through the crowd as rioters attempted to storm the building in an attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. Byerly also allegedly charged at officers during the melee while holding what appeared to be a Taser that he activated near the cops. Officers wrestled with Byrerly after noticing the Taser, but he was able to break free after another rioter helped him get away from a cop, according to the complaint. More than 500 rioters have been charged in the melee, which led to the deaths of five people, including a Capitol Police officer. The cases are being prosecuted by the US Attorney’s Office in Washington, D. C., and investigated by the FBI and other federal law enforcement agencies.
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
wral.com
Pennsylvania man charged with rushing at officers with a taser and taking part in the assault of a photographer for the Associated Press during the US Capitol riot
businessinsider.com
Capitol Rioter Arrested For Allegedly Charging at Police With Taser, Assaulting Officer
newsweek.com

 

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1.8
Crane collapse in Philadelphia kills a man, injures another
(4.17/48)

A massive construction drill toppled over and crushed a man to death Tuesday night in Philadelphia, police said. Firefighters and police responded just after 9:10 p.m. to the 3100 block of Convention Avenue near Franklin Field and the Penn Museum in University City and found the man trapped under the drilling rig, police said. It was not known how long the 55-year-old had been there. According to The Philadelphia Inquirer, he was still breathing but unconscious and bleeding heavily when he was rescued. He was transported by medics to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 9:45 p.m., said Chief Inspector Scott Small. The rig operator was not seriously hurt but may have been taken to the hospital to be checked out, Small said. The rig was marked as belonging to Cook Drilling Corp. of Trevose. The company’s website shows a rig that appears similar and says it weighs 75 tons. A representative for the company could not be reached for comment. Police were investigating the accident and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration also was expected to investigate, Small said.
Stray Elephant Kills 32-Year-Old Man
newsweek.com
24-year-old man shot and killed, woman injured in barricaded gunman situation
eu.freep.com
Massive crane collapses and kills man in Philadelphia
cbsnews.com
Crane collapse in Philadelphia kills a man, injures another
wtop.com

 

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0.2
Former South African leader Zuma turns himself in
(4.08/48)

NKANDLA, South Africa — Former South African president Jacob Zuma turned himself over to police early Thursday to begin serving a 15-month prison term. Just minutes before the midnight deadline for police to arrest him, Zuma left his Nkandla home in a convoy of vehicles. Zuma decided to hand himself over to authorities to obey the order from the country’s highest court, the Constitutional Court, that he should serve a prison term for contempt of court. “President Zuma has decided to comply with the incarceration order. He is on his way to hand himself into a Correctional Services Facility in KZN (KwaZulu-Natal province),” said a tweet posted by the Zuma Foundation. Soon after the South African police confirmed that Zuma was in their custody. Zuma’s decision to obey the Constitutional Court order comes after a week of rising tensions over his prison sentence. Zuma was sentenced to 15 months in prison for contempt because he defied a court order for him to testify before a judicial commission investigating widespread allegations of corruption during his time as the country’s president, from 2009 to 2018. The Constitutional Court ordered that if Zuma did not voluntarily hand himself over to the police then the police should arrest the country’s former president by the end of the day Wednesday. In a last-minute plea to avoid going to prison, Zuma’s lawyers had written to the acting chief justice requesting that his arrest be suspended until Friday, when a regional court is to rule on his application to postpone the arrest. Zuma’s lawyers asked the acting chief justice to issue directives stopping the police from arresting him, claiming there would be a “prejudice to his life.” The top court met late Wednesday, according to local reports, but apparently rejected Zuma’s request. Zuma had also launched two court proceedings to avoid arrest after his sentence last week. He applied at the Constitutional Court for his sentence to be rescinded and that application will be heard on July 12. On Tuesday, his lawyers were in the Pietermaritzburg High Court seeking to stop the minister of police from arresting him until the Constitutional Court rules on his application to have the sentence rescinded. The regional court will rule on that application on Friday. Political tensions have risen in KwaZulu-Natal province as a result of Zuma’s conviction, sentence and pending arrest. Hundreds of his supporters gathered at his home over the weekend and vowed to prevent his arrest, but they left on Sunday. Related Articles Six months after Jan.6, search is still on Capitol attackers Britney Spears’ court-appointed attorney petitions to resign More than a dozen Capitol rioters have pleaded guilty Garland halts federal executions, orders protocol review Trump Org., CFO indicted on tax fraud charges The judicial inquiry into corruption during his term as president has heard damning testimony from former Cabinet ministers and top executives of state-owned corporations that Zuma allowed his associates, members of the Gupta family, to influence his Cabinet appointments and lucrative contracts. Zuma refused to comply with a court order to appear before the commission, which led the Constitutional Court to convict him of contempt and sentence him to prison. In a separate matter, Zuma is standing trial on charges of corruption related to a 1999 arms deal, where he allegedly received bribes from French arms manufacturer Thales. His financial adviser has already been convicted and imprisoned in that case.
South Africa's ex-leader asks top judge to delay his arrest
abcnews.go.com
Former South African leader turns himself in for prison term
independent.ie
Jacob Zuma, Former South African President, Is Arrested
nytimes.com
South Africa’s ex-leader asks top judge to delay his arrest
wtop.com

 

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86.5
Police ID man,30, who was killed Tuesday in his St. Paul home
(3.99/48)

The victim of a homicide Tuesday in St. Paul was a 30-year-old man who was killed at his home, police said Wednesday. The circumstances of Keifer M. Morgan’s death remain under investigation, and no one had been arrested as of Wednesday afternoon. Morgan’s fiancée said he wanted to give their children, ages 1,3 and 4, the best lives he could. She described him as loving and strong-willed, and asked anyone with information about his killing to come forward. Police responding to a 911 call about a shooting at 6:40 p.m. Tuesday found Morgan shot in a home in the 1100 block of Pacific Street in the Dayton’s Bluff neighborhood. Police said Morgan lived at the residence, which is a rental property. The shooting did not appear random, police said Tuesday night. Investigators requested that people with information call them at 651-266-5650.
Stray Elephant Kills 32-Year-Old Man
newsweek.com
Assassins Kill President of Haiti in Midnight Home Invasion
breitbart.com
Man killed by police in Olivia MN died of multiple gunshots
twincities.com
Darnella Frazier's Uncle ID'd as Bystander Killed by Minneapolis Police
tmz.com

 

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0.6
More than 535 arrested so far in Capitol riot case, while more than 300 suspects remain unidentified
(3.24/48)

America watched as hordes of rioters on January 6 — crushing through windows, pressing up stairways, and sending lawmakers and law enforcement running for their lives. The flood of protesters who streamed into the Capitol that day left federal authorities with an equally immense task: finding and charging those responsible. The Department of Justice said that six months after the attack, more than 535 defendants had been arrested, and the FBI said they have yet to identify more than 300 individuals believed to have committed violent acts on the Capitol grounds, including over 200 who assaulted police officers. FBI Director Christopher Wray said late last month, "This is far from over." Prosecutors have called the case "unprecedented" in scale, and the government said in a March court filing that the Capitol attack "is likely the most complex investigation ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice." As law enforcement continues to round up alleged rioters, here's what CBS News has learned about those who were arrested: Of the more than 535 defendants who have been arrested in connection with the riots, CBS News has reviewed court documents for 493 defendants' cases that have been unsealed. Of those, at least 190 defendants were also indicted by grand juries. So far, at least 13 defendants have pleaded guilty, including, who have agreed to cooperate with the government. At least nine others have pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges, and one in the Senate chamber pleaded guilty to obstruction of an official proceeding. So far just one defendant, Anna Morgan-Lloyd, has been, to three years probation and no jail time. For others, plea negotiations have been by the vast amounts of evidence involved in the investigation. The Justice Department said at least 165 defendants have been charged with assaulting, resisting, or impeding officers or employees, including more than 50 who were charged with using a deadly or dangerous weapon or causing serious bodily injury to an officer. In total, CBS News has that more than 150 officers were injured in the attack, according to sources on Capitol Hill and the Capitol Police union, as well as testimony from Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee. Approximately six people have been arrested on charges related to assaulting a member of the media or destroying their equipment on January 6. Nearly 235 defendants were charged with corruptly obstructing, influencing, or impeding an official proceeding or attempting to do so, and approximately 40 defendants have been charged with , a charge that alleges defendants coordinated with others to commit an offense. They include four alleged,16 Oath Keepers who were indicted together in a single conspiracy case and 15 members or affiliates of the Proud Boys, who were charged in four separate conspiracy cases. The Justice Department also said that almost 495 defendants were charged with entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds. More than 55 were charged with entering the Capitol with a dangerous or deadly weapon, while over 35 were charged with destruction of government property and almost 30 were charged with theft of government property, the Department of Justice said. During proceedings for of the more than 35 defendants charged with destruction of government property, the government said their crimes amounted to "terrorism" — an allegation that is not itself a charge but could influence prison sentences if they are found guilty. At least 55 of those arrested are current or former military members. Of those, is an active duty service member, four are current part-time troops in the Army Reserve or National Guard and 50 previously served in the military, according to attorney statements, military service records and court documents obtained by CBS News. At least 24 have served in the U. S. Marines,21 have served in the Army, two served in the Navy and two served in the Air Force. One defendant, Jeffrey McKellop, was a communications sergeant with the Army Special Forces, a group known colloquially as the Green Berets. The Army Reserve shared the following statement with CBS News: "The U. S. Army Reserve takes all allegations of Soldier or Army civilian involvement in extremist groups seriously and will address this issue in accordance with Army regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice to ensure due process. Extremist ideologies and activities directly oppose our values and beliefs and those who subscribe to extremism have no place in our ranks." At least 12 of those arrested were either former police officers or were employed as law enforcement officers at the time of the riot, according to court documents and employment records. Prosecutors also charged at least one current firefighter and one firefighter. Of the six police officers employed at the time of the riot, at least five have since lost their jobs. Karol J. Chwiesiuk, a Chicago police officer who was arrested June 11 and accused of entering the Capitol building on January 6, was not fired but has been "relieved of his police powers," a department spokesperson said. The Board of Supervisors in North Cornwall Township, Pennsylvania, voted June 1 to fire Joseph Fischer, a police officer who had been charged with, among other crimes, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder. Houston police officer Tam Dinh Pham and Monmouth County correctional police officer Marissa Suarez both resigned after they were arrested, and two were fired after prosecutors charged them for their alleged conduct at the Capitol. Prosecutors have charged at least one former police chief. Alan Hostetter was chief of the La Habra Police Department in California for eight months in 2010, according to the department, and prosecutors have him with conspiring to obstruct an official proceeding. Prosecutors have also charged former officers with the New York Police Department: Thomas Webster, who is accused of lunging at a Capitol police officer with a flagpole, and Sara Carpenter, whose arrest, an NYPD spokesperson said, was the culmination of the NYPD's close work with the FBI Joint Terrorism Taskforce. Nicholes Lentz — who the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said is a former officer in the North Miami Beach and Fort Pierce police departments — was charged after posting videos from inside the Capitol. In a video, he said, "We're not here to hurt any cops of course. I love my boys in blue, but this is overwhelming for them." The Justice Department said Tuesday that the FBI was still seeking the public's help to identify more than 300 people believed to have committed violent acts on the Capitol grounds, including over 200 who assaulted police officers. FBI Director Christopher Wray said in March that citizens from around the country had sent the FBI more than 270,000 digital media tips. The government said it has issued a combined total of over 900 search warrants and the investigation has included more than 15,000 hours of surveillance and body-worn camera footage from multiple law enforcement agencies. The government has also gathered approximately 1,600 electronic devices, the results of hundreds of searches of electronic communication providers, over 80,000 reports and 93,000 attachments related to law enforcement interviews and other investigative steps, authorities said in a filing. The alleged rioters come from at least 45 states outside of Washington, D. C. Among those arrested whose home states were known, the most were from Florida, with at least 48 Floridians charged so far. Texas had at least 45 residents arrested, while Pennsylvania had at least 41 residents arrested and New York had at least 36. Authorities have connected at least 80 alleged rioters to extremist groups, including the , Texas Freedom Force and the conspiracy ideology. While those arrested in the January 6 mob were mostly men, at least 59 women have also been arrested for their alleged participation. Among the 159 defendants whose ages are known, the average age is 41. The youngest-known alleged rioter is 18-year-old Bruno Joseph Cua, whom prosecutors accused of assaulting an officer after he posted online, "President Trump is calling us to FIGHT!" The oldest is Gary Wickersham, who, according to his attorney, is an 80-year-old Army veteran. Authorities said Wickersham walked through the Capitol during the siege and later told authorities he believed he was authorized to enter because he pays his taxes. The FBI released that they say show 11 people assaulting officers during fighting outside the Capitol. The suspects have yet to be identified, and the FBI is seeking the public's help. Lawmakers trapped in the House Gallery on January 6 have since formed a support group. For an on "CBS This Morning," Nikole Killion met a group of lawmakers who have developed a shared bond as they try to cope with what happened. Former President Trump is Facebook, Twitter and YouTube for what he called "illegal, unconstitutional censorship." The platforms banned his accounts after a mob of his supporters overran the Capitol, citing concerns that he would encourage more violence. A third member of the Oath Keepers has and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors investigating the January 6 Capitol riot. In pleading guilty, Mark Grods admitted to allegations that place him at the center of key claims in one of the highest profile conspiracy cases connected to the Capitol riot. The House of Representatives a bill to create a select committee to investigate the attack, after Senate Republicans blocked a measure to form an independent commission.
Capitol riot suspect charged with attacking AP photographer
thehill.com
DOJ charges Capitol riot suspect with attacking AP photographer
edition.cnn.com
Six months later, the FBI is still trying to identify these Capitol riot suspects
cbsnews.com
Arrested Teacher Used Parler to Encourage Others to Join Capitol Riots—DoJ
newsweek.com

 

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0.4
FBI Seized ‘Fully Constructed U. S. Capitol Lego Set’ from Alleged Capitol Rioter
(3.22/48)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) seized a “fully constructed U. S. Capitol Lego set” from the home of a man facing charges in connection with the riot at the Capitol on January 6, according to a court filing last week. Robert Morss, a substitute social studies teacher, allegedly engaged in violent behavior during the riot, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Video shows him near the front line of rioters who pushed past police guarding the Capitol, organizing a “shield wall” in the attack on officers in the Lower West Terrace tunnel and then entering the building through a broken window, the FBI said. At one point, Mr. Morss is seen grabbing an officer’s baton and trying to rip it away, agents said in an affidavit. He is also seen reaching through the crowd and grabbing a fence being held by police to keep the crowd back and then ripping the fence out of the hands of an officer with the assistance of other rioters. He is seen retreating into the crowd with the fence, the FBI said. In court documents filed July 2, as the Department of Justice pushed for Morss to be detained until trial, the federal government noted: During his arrest, law enforcement recovered some clothing and other items that appear to match those he carried with him on the 6th – including a “Don’t Tread on Me” flag, a neck gaiter, a military utility bag, a black tourniquet, and military fatigues. (Law enforcement also recoverd a fully constructed U. S. Capitol Lego set.) In addition, MORSS had three different firearms including a handgun, a shotgun, and a rifle. The Hill noted: “It’s unclear why Morss had the Lego set.” The Capitol set is one of the most sought-after and most expensive LEGO sets, currently priced at $266.95 at Amazon.com. Though President Joe Biden promised not to let politics interfere with the administration of justice, many individuals are being arrested for non-violent behavior during the riot. Critics say that accused Capitol rioters are being prosecuted more vigorously than the left-wing rioters who caused havoc across the nation during unrest last year.
Twitter laughs off report that FBI seized Capitol Lego set from alleged riot leader: ‘This isn’t satire’
foxnews.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
wral.com

 

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0.1
6 months after Capitol assault, DC still needs statehood
(3.17/48)

Six months have passed since the Capitol insurrection. In that time, members of Congress sought to create a bipartisan independent commission to investigate the attack, but they were stymied by the Senate filibuster. Despite that, a House select committee is poised to look into the insurrection, and we must take steps to ensure nothing like it ever happens again. The first action, to fence the Capitol, may have been necessary for a brief period of time, but I’m glad to see much of the fencing has come down. A walled-off Capitol is not how things should be. It is the people’s place and should have only what is necessary for security. During my three terms in the Senate, the Capitol and adjacent office buildings were open to the American people, so anyone could come see me and my staff about their concerns. I loved seeing D. C. families sled down the Capitol lawn each winter when so many of us were away from our families. The second action, bringing to justice those who committed crimes, has proceeded, with more than 500 people arrested or charged so far. That is crucial, not just to hold the rioters accountable but also because sensitive materials, including laptops, were stolen from Capitol offices. A third action is to monitor online planning of violent actions. This is a different challenge from what we faced when I chaired the Senate Intelligence Committee, but it’s essential to stave off further violence. Lastly, the Jan.6 attack reiterated the importance of statehood for Washington, D. C. The District of Columbia reached a less-recognized but crucial milestone on April 22, when the House voted for D. C. statehood. Washington is best known as the nation’s capital, but it is mostly residential and has a long-standing and vibrant community of 700,000 people — more than Vermont or Wyoming. Residents pay federal and local taxes, register for the draft, serve on juries and have all the duties of other citizens. D. C. also has a large share of residents who serve in the military and is home to 32,000 veterans. But they have no voting representation in the House or Senate, so their license plates read “taxation without representation.” D. C.’s second-class status means it does not control its own national guard. So on Jan.6, when it became clear the Capitol Police would need help, D. C.’s mayor lacked the authority to order D. C.’s National Guard into action. Instead, the request for support was delayed while awaiting approval from Pentagon officials. Once the Capitol was finally secure later that day, D. C. residents, who did not incite the riots, were subjected to a curfew. Congress then debated accountability for the Jan.6 riot and subsequent impeachment, but D. C. residents — including those in the Capitol Police, Metropolitan Police Department, and D. C. National Guard — had no say because they have no representation in the Congress some of them had defended. The D. C. statehood bill got a hearing last month at the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, chaired by Michigan’s Gary Peters and on which my own Arizona senator, Kyrsten Sinema, serves. My former colleague Joe Lieberman, a strong supporter of Republicans such as John McCain and Susan Collins, made an impassioned plea to the committee to grant equal rights to D. C. residents through statehood. The last time the Senate voted on granting equal representation to D. C. was in 1978, when Barry Goldwater and I represented Arizona, and both of us supported the legislation. Eighteen other Senate Republicans joined Goldwater in voting for the bill. This was consistent with historical Republican support for local self-government and equal rights under the law. President Dwight Eisenhower argued in his 1954 State of the Union address, “In the District of Columbia, the time is long overdue for granting national suffrage to its citizens.” President Richard Nixon told Americans in 1969, “It should offend the democratic senses of this nation that the… citizens of its capital … have no voice in the Congress.” Despite opposition from current Republican leadership, supporting full voting rights and representation for 700,000 of our fellow Americans is clearly the right thing to do. As a Democrat, I have crossed party lines to back Republicans several times because I felt that, on the merits, those were the right votes for our country at the moment. Equality for D. C. residents, on the merits, should have bipartisan support as it has received in the past. As state legislatures pass voter suppression laws, I hope our senators realize that the right to vote and be represented is sacrosanct, and Americans should not forfeit it just because they live in our capital. Dennis DeConcini represented Arizona in the Senate as a Democrat from 1977 to 1995. He chaired the Senate Intelligence Committee from 1993 to 1995.
Six months later, the FBI is still trying to identify these Capitol riot suspects
cbsnews.com
Hunt for Capitol attackers still on 6 months after Jan.6
myfox8.com
Over 535 Charged 6 Months After Jan.6 Capitol Breach: DOJ
theepochtimes.com

 

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0.4
Judge grants sentence delay for cooperating Gaetz associate
(3.17/48)

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge agreed Wednesday to delay the sentencing of a key associate of Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida so he can keep cooperating in a broader sex trafficking investigation. U. S. District Judge Gregory Presnell rescheduled for Nov.18 the sentencing date for Joel Greenberg. He had been set for sentencing on August 19. Greenberg pleaded guilty in May to sex trafficking of a minor and five other charges, among the nearly three dozen he faced. His plea agreement with prosecutors requires continued cooperation with the ongoing probe. Defense attorney Fritz Scheller said the additional three months are crucial to finish Greenberg’s cooperation with investigators. “Said cooperation, which could impact his ultimate sentence, cannot be completed by the time of his sentencing,” Scheller wrote. Greenberg, the former Seminole County tax collector, currently faces an estimated 12 years in prison, his lawyer noted. Greenberg,36, also pleaded guilty to identity theft, wire fraud and conspiracy. Gaetz, a Republican who represents much of the Florida Panhandle, was not mentioned in Greenberg’s plea agreement. But Greenberg’s cooperation could play a role in an ongoing investigation into Gaetz ‘s supposed pay-for-sex relationship with a 17-year-old girl. While not mentioning Gaetz by name, in his plea deal Greenberg said he “introduced the minor to other adult men, who engaged in commercial sex acts.” Gaetz, a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has denied any allegations of wrongdoing and has said repeatedly he will not resign from Congress. No charges have been brought against Gaetz. Greenberg has been linked to a number of other Florida politicians and their associates. So far, none of them have been implicated by name in the sex trafficking probe. The Greenberg plea agreement says that he admitted being “involved in what are sometimes referred to as ‘sugar daddy’ relationships where he paid women for sex, but attempted to disguise the payments as ‘school-related’ expenses or other living expenses.”
Gaetz associate Greenberg requests sentencing delay to keep cooperating with federal prosectors
msnbc.com
Gaetz associate seeks sentence delay to continue cooperation
wtop.com
Judge delays sentencing of Matt Gaetz associate so he can cooperate in sex trafficking probe
washingtontimes.com
Rep. Matt Gaetz Associate Joel Greenberg Seeks Delay In Sentencing
miami.cbslocal.com

 

 24 /113 

0.7
Judge jails editor over reporter’s use of recorder in court
(3.09/48)

RALEIGH, N. C. — A North Carolina Superior Court judge put a small-town newspaper editor behind bars last month after one of his reporters used an audio recorder for note-taking purposes at a murder trial — a punishment the paper and media rights groups consider excessive. Judge Stephan Futrell sentenced Gavin Stone, the news editor of the Richmond County Daily Journal, to five days in jail before having the editor hauled off to jail. Stone was released the next day but still faces the possibility of more time in lockup. Brian Bloom, the paper’s publisher, acknowledged that his reporter shouldn’t have had the recorder in court because it was not allowed but criticized the judge’s move to imprison an editor for a minor infraction committed by a colleague. “The penalty does not fit the crime,” he said. “Let’s put this in perspective: You stop a murder trial not once, but twice, because a guy had a tape recorder sitting next to him on a bench at a courtroom. Let’s put our priorities in place here.” Futrell did not respond to a request for comment. Superior Court rules allow electronic media and still photography coverage of public judicial proceedings, but grant judges the authority to prohibit the technology. Staff writer Matthew Sasser, who has worked at the paper only since January, brought the recorder into the courtroom on June 21 and 22 after being screened through courthouse security, Bloom said. Stone, who in January 2020 received a letter from a different judge reprimanding him for taking a photo inside a courtroom, was aware cellphones were prohibited and had been notified at the time that he wasn’t allowed to bring a “cellphone, camera or any other recording device into the courthouse” unless he had a judge’s permission. Having remembered only the prohibition on cellphones, Stone told Sasser that an audio recorder was fine. Sasser used the device during a recess to interview a source in the courtroom. When Futrell learned Sasser had the recorder, he directed the reporter to remove it from his courtroom. Sasser went back to the newsroom. A bailiff called him to return to court to speak with the judge and Stone accompanied him back. The two expected the judge to speak with them behind closed doors but were surprised when a bailiff directed them inside the courtroom, where Futrell stopped the trial and found the editor and reporter in criminal contempt of court. The judge sentenced Stone to five days in jail and fined Sasser $500. “I was blown away that the decision was made that fast,” Stone said. “It happened so fast. There was no real way to process it in the moment and recognize what I was even involved in. All of a sudden, I’m in orange.” Bloom hastily found an attorney who filed an appeal and got Stone out of jail the next day. “It’s a little disturbing when a judge starts contempt proceedings over the use of an unobtrusive, quiet, pocket-sized device that a reporter uses to do their job in a courtroom,” said Brooks Fuller, director of the North Carolina Open Government Coalition and an assistant professor of journalism at Elon University. Jonathan Jones, a private attorney in Durham who handles free speech cases, called the judge’s decision “extremely unusual.” Jones said an appeals court should find that Stone was wrongfully held in direct criminal contempt since he wasn’t the one disrupting court proceedings. He said that Stone was entitled to a lawyer before Futrell sentenced him and it’s open for debate whether Sasser deserved to be held in contempt. The newspaper’s appeal is scheduled to be heard July 16. Futrell has removed the original penalties on Stone and Sasser and is allowing an appeals court to decide whether to make the editor and reporter pay as much as $500 each and serve up to 30 days in jail. Under North Carolina law, courts can punish someone for criminal contempt if the act was preceded by a clear warning from the court that the conduct was improper. A person held in criminal contempt can be punished through a formal reprimand, imprisonment of up to 30 days, a fine up to $500 or any combination of the three. The newspaper stopped covering the murder trial once Stone was taken into custody, partially out of fear the judge would retaliate. It has not reported on Stone’s arrest or Sasser’s fine.
Editor jailed after reporter recorded murder trial in North Carolina: AP
thehill.com
Newspaper Editor, Reporter Could Be Sentenced to Jail For Use of Recorder During Trial
newsweek.com
Judge jails editor over reporter's use of recorder in court
wral.com

 

 25 /113 

97.7
Suspected serial killer linked to series of slayings in Delaware and Pennsylvania indicted
(3.09/48)

A suspected serial killer linked to a spate of killings in Delaware and Philadelphia has been indicted on 41 felony charges in connection with the “brutal crime spree,” the Delaware Attorney General’s Office said. Prosecutors have alleged that Keith Gibson killed two people and injured four others in Delaware during a weeks-long crime spree earlier this year. The 39-year-old suspect has also been accused of several slayings committed in Pennsylvania, including the killing of his 54-year-old mother, Christine Gibson, who was found shot to death in February. “This indictment lays out one of the most vicious, staggering crime sprees I’ve seen in my career,” Delaware Attorney General Kathleen Jennings said in a statement issued Tuesday. “It is even more disturbing to think, based on what investigators have revealed in Pennsylvania, that this may just be the tip of the iceberg.” Investigators have said that Gibson fatally shot 28-year-old Leslie Ruiz-Basilio during a robbery at a cellphone store in Elsmere, Delaware, on May 15, and then stole her car. Weeks later on June 5, he allegedly shot and killed 42-year-old Robin Wright and wounded another man amid a street robbery in Wilmington. Earlier the same day, Christine Lugo was attacked while opened her doughnut shop in Philadelphia. According to police, Gibson pushed her inside at gunpoint, stole about $300, shot her in the head and fled the scene. Lugo was pronounced dead a short time later. She was 40 years old. Authorities believe Gibson additionally robbed or assaulted another three people in Delaware, and attempted to murder one of them. He was arrested June 8 in connection with the robbery of a Wilmington Rite-Aid during which a clerk was pistol-whipped. With News Wire Services
Suspected Serial Killer Who Allegedly Went On ‘Vicious’ Crime Spree Charged With 41 Felonies
dailycaller.com
Suspected serial killer indicted on 41 felony counts after 'vicious' spree
foxnews.com
Suspected serial killer indicted on 41 felonies in Delaware after 'brutal crime spree'
usatoday.com

 

 26 /113 

7.4
End Criminal US Wars Not Just Illegal Killings
(2.99/48)

Two US lawmakers have this week complained to Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin over a Pentagon report which purports to account for civilians killed accidentally by American forces. Representative Ro Hanna and Senator Elizabeth Warren, both Democrats, rebuked the Department of Defense (DoD) for minimizing the number of casualties. The lawmakers cite open sources that indicate the Pentagon underestimated deaths by a factor of five. Calling for a further investigation into the Pentagon’s admissions, the lawmakers stated: “We need to openly consider all the costs, benefits, and consequences of military action, and that includes doing everything we can to prevent and respond to civilian harm.” The Pentagon report in question is an annual accounting of civilian deaths caused by US forces in foreign operations. It claims that there were only 23 civilians killed during the year 2020 in military deployments across six countries: Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Somalia and Nigeria. It is by no means the first time that the Pentagon has been accused of underestimating its “collateral damage”. In a previous report for 2019, it claimed responsibility for 132 civilian deaths in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria whereas open-source figures put the death toll for the period at nearly 10 times higher. On reading the latest US military report, it sounds like the epitome of legal probity and humanitarian scruples. However, to get hung up on the narrow issue about the exact number of unlawful killings inflicted by the American military, or on whether those deaths amount to war crimes or not, is to miss a much more important point. That is, the entire US military presence in these foreign countries is illegal and arguably amounts to the supreme war crime of aggression. The Pentagon report admits to operations in just six countries. No doubt there are more nations where US covert forces are deployed. But let’s just take the six admitted to. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were the result of US lies and fabrications about the perpetrators of 9/11 and weapons of mass destruction. There was no justification for these wars which caused millions of deaths over a span of two decades. Doing an annual audit on civilian deaths is obscenely misplaced. Those entire military operations were “permitted” by ad hoc US laws known as Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF). Under international law, the only foreign military deployments that are legitimate are those mandated by a right to self-defense from imminent attack, or by the UN Security Council, or by a request from an allied government for assistance. Arguably, the US launched its wars on Afghanistan and Iraq without meeting any of these criteria. In the cases of Syria, Yemen, Somalia and Nigeria, the illegal presence of US forces is even more salient. The invocation of AUMF laws by Washington is grotesquely tenuous. It is simply a carte blanche to invade foreign nations and bomb at will. That is nothing less than aggression and state terrorism. So, while Democratic lawmakers in the US may sound ethical in their criticism of the Pentagon over counting civilian casualties, their concern about “proper accounting” and “costs and benefits” is really a sham. The real and only issue is to end all criminal US wars that are being waged in multiple countries simultaneously. American lawmakers and the American public need to realize that their government is guilty of war crimes, not just guilty of glossing over human horrors. American leaders shouldn’t be receiving letters of complaint. They should be receiving warrants for prosecution over war crimes. The views and opinions expressed in the article do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.
U. S. Closes Embassy Following Assassination Of Haitian President
dailywire.com
Mysterious illness is killing songbirds across the US, officials say
nypost.com

 

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0.3
LA riots witnesses stand their ground on the right to bear arms on 'Tucker Carlson Originals'
(2.21/48)

Fox Nation host Tucker Carlson investigates the decline of gun rights over the last three decades and the right to self-defense in the latest installment of " Tucker Carlson Originals." In "Surviving Disorder," Carlson retraces the frightening and tense moments of the 1992 Los Angeles riots with multiple victims and witnesses. The City of Angels experienced five days of unrest after four police officers were acquitted in the arrest and beating of Rodney King, an African-American man. David Joo, who Carlson interviewed for the special, had been in Koreatown when the riots broke out on April 29 of 1992. He was working as a manager at a local grocery store at the time - and when the possibility of looting and violence looked more like a reality, Joo said he knew he had to defend himself and his store. "We are pretty much on our own. So what should we do?" Joo said. "So, you know, no option. We... we have to defend our store." "So I packed some, you know, guns, rifles and shotguns and handguns," Joo said. "Right there, another driving shooter. I was hiding behind the car, another shooter. The first time, I was scared." Joo maintains he was protecting Korean people and Koreatown at large. After running out of ammunition, Joo ran to find more. But as he left the store unattended, looters made their way in, and more shooting erupted. When police eventually performed a more thorough investigation, they found 75 bullet holes scattered across the store’s walls. "So after that, they said, O. K., David, actually, self-defense, so you can go home," Joo said. Now, in a time when police are hamstrung and riots continue to permeate the nation, Tucker Carlson examines whether American citizens today have the right - and resources - to protect themselves. "Tucker Carlson Originals: Surviving Disorder" is available to stream now on Fox Nation. Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from your favorite Fox News personalities.
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
wral.com

 

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0.6
Virginia taekwondo instructor charged with sexually assaulting a minor
(2.21/48)

A taekwondo instructor in Lorton, Virginia, has been arrested and charged with sexually assaulting a minor in 2019. Fairfax County police said a juvenile recently disclosed that while she attended an after-school program at Kong’s Taekwondo Learning Center on Gunston Plaza, instructor Rochdi Tibta,22, of Springfield, had her sit on his lap and unlawfully touched her on three occasions. Last Friday, Fairfax County police detectives arrested and charged Tibta with three counts of aggravated sexual assault. He’s being held without bond. Detectives said Tibta worked at the center from December 2018 to December 2019 and was the sole caretaker at the business for juveniles on several occasions. The police said they would like to hear from anyone who is concerned their child may have had inappropriate contact with Tibta. They can call the Major Crimes Bureau at 703-246-7800.
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
wral.com

 

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0.6
Reminder of Capitol Riot Is About to Come Down
(2.14/48)

(Newser) – The fencing installed around the Capitol after the deadly Jan.6 insurrection will start being removed as soon as Friday, but most visitors are still not allowed inside the iconic building. That's according to the House sergeant-at-arms in a memo Wednesday to all members of Congress and staff, the AP reports. The stark, black perimeter fence is one of the last remaining signs of the mob siege that shook the world as supporters of former President Trump stormed the building, trying to stop the certification of President Biden's election victory. Even with its removal, the Capitol will remain closed to most visitors, the memo said. "Although the temporary fencing will be removed, current building access restrictions will remain in place," the memo said. Because of the pandemic and the insurrection, the Capitol has been closed to most visitors for the longest stretch in the nation's history—nearly 16 months. Federal officials are aware of online chatter from far-right groups and people who believe in conspiracy theories discussing potentially returning to Washington as part of an unfounded and baseless conspiracy theory that Trump will be reinstated in August. Five people died in the January attack, including a Trump supporter shot and killed by police inside the Capitol and three people who suffered medical emergencies in the crowd. One police officer died later after having battled rioters. Two other officers later took their own lives. Capitol Police will continue to monitor intelligence information and potential threats, and new fencing could be swiftly erected, the memo said. Removal of the fence will take up to three days, weather permitting. In normal times, about 2.5 million people a year tour the Capitol. Permanent fencing was suggested for the Capitol grounds, but the idea gained little support.
Six months later, the FBI is still trying to identify these Capitol riot suspects
cbsnews.com
The fencing built around the Capitol after the Jan.6 riot is coming down.
nytimes.com

 

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30.5
GoFundMe for Mohammad Anwar, Killed UberEats Driver, Hit $1M Before Girls Sentenced
(2.14/48)

A GoFundMe page set up to help the family of Mohammad Anwar, the UberEats driver killed during an armed carjacking, hit $1 million months before the two girls involved were sentenced. One girl, who was 13 at the time of the attack in March, was ordered on Tuesday to remain in the custody of Washington, D. C.'s Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services until she turns 21. She pleaded guilty to second-degree murder last month, prompting prosecutors to drop other charges, including armed carjacking, against her. The 15-year-old girl involved in Anwar's death pleaded guilty to felony murder and was also committed to a youth facility until she turns 21. Police said Anwar,66, was assaulted with a stun gun during the carjacking in the 1200 block of Van Street in Washington on March 23. Anwar's family set up the GoFundMe shortly afterward, and donations flooded in as a graphic video that captured the man's final moments was widely viewed on Twitter. The clip started with Anwar in a struggle with the girls, yelling: "They're thieves. This is my car!" It then showed the girls speeding off with Anwar clinging to the vehicle, which then crashed. The girls were seen climbing out of the car unscathed, while Anwar lay critically injured in the street. He was pronounced dead in hospital. Anwar, of Springfield, Virginia, was described as a "hard-working Pakistani immigrant who came to the United States to create a better life for him and his family" on the page set up to pay for his funeral and to support his family. His family disabled donations in April after raising $1,049,670. "Anwar was a beloved husband, father, grandfather, uncle, and friend who always provided a smile when you needed one. He leaves behind a family, near and far, who cherish, love, and miss him dearly," Lehra Bogino, who said Anwar was her husband's uncle, wrote on the page. "Words can not describe how our family is feeling currently. Devastation, confusion, shock, anger, heartache, and anguish are just a few that come to mind. We will carry him with us always, but it doesn't take the pain away of losing him so tragically and so unexpectedly soon." Anwar's family has been contacted for comment.
Man charged in attack on AP photographer, police at Capitol
abcnews.go.com
Girl Sentenced in Carjacking Murder of Washington, D. C. Uber Eats Driver Mohammad Anwar
lawandcrime.com

 

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1.1
Georgia golf pro was gunned down after he witnessed a crime, police say
(2.13/48)

A golf pro who was gunned down Saturday at a suburban Atlanta country club by a man who had driven a pickup truck onto the golf course was not the gunman’s target but was killed because he had “witnessed an active crime taking place,” the police said Tuesday. The gunman, who the authorities said had not been identified, fled after the shooting at the Pinetree Country Club near Kennesaw, Georgia, leaving behind a pickup truck that held in its bed the bodies of two other men who had been fatally shot. The gunman was still at large Tuesday evening, three days after the shooting. The Cobb County Police Department said that investigators were still trying to determine a motive in what they were treating as a triple homicide but that there was no “active threat to the public at large and there was not a directed threat to residents of the neighborhood.” The golf pro was identified as Gene Siller,46, a father of two young sons who was the director of golf at the country club. A GoFundMe page that was started on behalf of his family had raised more than $500,000 by Tuesday evening. One of the men found in the truck was identified by the police as Paul Pierson,76, who was the truck’s registered owner. The police said the third victim had not yet been identified. At about 2 p.m. Saturday, officials said, Siller was walking toward the 10th hole at Pinetree when he saw a white Ram 3500 pickup truck on the course. The gunman shot Siller in the head and fled, officials said. When investigators arrived, they also found Pierson and the third victim in the bed of the truck, dead from gunshot wounds, the authorities said. Both men found in the truck had “no relation to the location at all,” the police said. “We are aware that the public has many questions, the most pressing one being why this happened; however, it is too early in the investigation to speculate as to motive,” the Cobb County police said in a statement Tuesday. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation has not been asked to assist, said Nelly Miles, a spokesperson for the GBI. Derek Easterling, the mayor of Kennesaw, said that while the shooting had taken place just outside his city’s limits, the community was still “grieving for all of the victims.” Easterling described the neighborhood near the country club as quiet. The golf course is surrounded by rambling suburban homes on wooded lots. “It’s just tragic,” he said. Corey Evans, an instructor at the country club, told The Atlanta Journal Constitution that Siller had dropped by the club Saturday to remind his staff that the driving range would be used to set off fireworks that weekend. Evans said the club had been thriving under Siller’s leadership. Brian Katrek, a golf analyst for TV outlets and a member of the Pinetree Country Club, told CNN that Siller “would do anything he could do to make your day better.” One donor on the GoFundMe page wrote of Siller: “He always carried himself with class, and was a gem of a guy. It’s no surprise that he built a great career and family.” This article originally appeared in The New York Times .
Gene Siller: Pro golfer shot in Georgia was killed because he came upon crime, police say
eu.cincinnati.com
Pro golfer shot dead on Georgia course because he stumbled upon crime in progress: Police
abc7news.com

 

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1.5
The Real Toll From Prison Covid Cases May Be Higher Than Reported
(2.10/48)

Richard Williamson,86, was rushed from a Florida jail to a hospital last July. Within two weeks, he had died of Covid-19. Hours after Cameron Melius,26, was released from a Virginia jail in October, he was taken by ambulance to a hospital, where he died. The coronavirus, the authorities said, was among the causes. And in New York City, Juan Cruz,57, who fell ill with Covid-19 while in jail, was moved from a hospital’s jail ward into its regular unit before dying. None of these deaths have been included in official Covid-19 mortality tolls of the jails where the men had been detained. And these cases are not unique. The New York Times identified dozens of people around the country who died under similar circumstances but were not included in official counts. In some cases, in places including Texas, Ohio and California, deaths were added to facilities’ virus tolls after The Times brought missing names to the attention of officials. In other cases, people who were infected with the coronavirus while incarcerated — but granted legal releases because of the severity of their illnesses — were not included in the death tallies of the jails where they got sick. Still other inmates’ deaths were left off facilities’ virus tolls for reasons that are unexplained. More than 2,700 people are reported to have died of Covid-19 in connection to U. S. prisons, jails and immigration detention centers, but the additional cases raise the prospect that the known toll on incarcerated people falls far short of providing the full picture. Concerns about how coronavirus deaths are documented have emerged throughout the pandemic, including a finding that the toll among nursing home residents in New York State was far higher than known because thousands who died in hospitals had not been included. A surge in deaths across the country last year that went beyond the known Covid-19 toll has health experts suggesting that some virus cases went undiagnosed or were misattributed to other causes. There have also been inconsistencies and shifting guidance regarding which deaths should count as coronavirus deaths. Public health officials say the prospect of overlooked virus deaths tied to the nation’s prisons, jails and immigration detention centers carries particular risks. It is challenging, the experts say, to prepare prisons for future epidemics without knowing the full toll. For now, the publicly known death totals connected to incarceration largely come from the facilities themselves. “You can’t make good public policy if you don’t know what’s actually going on the ground,” said Sharon Dolovich, director of the Covid Behind Bars Data Project at the University of California, Los Angeles, which tracks coronavirus deaths in American prisons. Prison and jail officials defended their methodologies for tallying coronavirus deaths of incarcerated people, saying they followed all federal and local documentation requirements. Some noted that their task was the tracking of “in custody” deaths, and suggested that including the deaths of people who had recently been in their care — but no longer were — would be both complex and impractical, and might even wind up overstating the number of virus cases with ties to the facilities. “It is unfair to expect jails to somehow take ownership of what happens to people once they are released from our custody,” said Kathy Hieatt, a spokeswoman for the Virginia Beach Sheriff’s Office, which held Mr. Melius in custody. “We follow the law and the extensive standards set by the Virginia Department of Corrections, which include the investigating and reporting of anyone who dies while in custody. Neither require reporting of deaths of former inmates.” She added: “It is asinine to think that we could somehow keep tabs on those thousands of people and take responsibility for them.” Throughout the pandemic, prison systems have used disparate methods to publicly report deaths connected to Covid-19. Nevada’s prisons say they inform state heath officials of inmate Covid-19 deaths but do not make them public. Mississippi prison authorities said no inmates had died from the coronavirus in their facilities before announcing in January that nearly two dozen prisoner deaths were tied to Covid-19. And in Texas, a prison medical committee is re-examining each case in which a medical examiner said Covid-19 was among the causes of death, and has sometimes overruled the earlier findings, according to Jeremy Desel, a spokesman for the state prison system. Shelia Bradley, a 53-year-old prisoner, was found by a medical examiner to have died of “bacterial and possibly fungal pneumonia, a complication of Covid-19,” but the committee concluded that she died from “acute bacterial bronchopneumonia,” without listing Covid-19. In at least nine cases identified by The Times, inmate deaths were not included in facilities’ coronavirus tolls even though medical examiners had cited Covid-19 as a cause or a contributing factor. It was uncertain why they were not included in the prison counts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that any fatality in which Covid-19 is listed as “a contributing cause” on the death certificate be deemed a coronavirus death even if other causes also are noted, but state and local officials have sometimes taken varying approaches. Further complicating matters, there can be discrepancies between what medical examiners deem the cause of a death and what is listed on death certificates, which are not publicly available in most cases. In another dozen cases identified by The Times, officials say fatalities were not included in tallies of prisoners who died of the virus because the inmates had been formally released from custody before they died. Some of the deaths have been reported by other publications, including North Carolina Health News and The City in New York. Mr. Melius, who worked in a vape shop, died two days after he finished his sentence at a jail in Virginia Beach, where he had been arrested on charges of misdemeanor assault and a probation violation. Covid-19 had spread through the jail, and Mr. Melius’s mother, Tammy Porter, said he fell seriously ill about four hours after he was released. At a hospital that afternoon, he tested positive for the coronavirus and was placed on a ventilator. Ms. Hieatt, the Virginia Beach Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman, said Mr. Melius’s death was not counted in the jail’s toll because he was no longer in custody when he died, nor had he complained of illness while in jail. She suggested that drug use may have played a role in his death, noting that an autopsy found fentanyl in Mr. Melius’s system. A medical examiner concluded that Mr. Melius’s death was as a result of “ anoxic encephalopathy following cardiac arrest, in addition to Covid-19 respiratory infection.” Anoxic encephalopathy, a lack of oxygen to the brain, can be caused by a variety of factors, experts said, including cardiac arrest or a drug overdose. A summary of the medical examiner’s autopsy report included no mention of drugs, and a spokeswoman for the medical examiner declined to comment beyond the summary. Complete autopsy reports are not part of the public record in Virginia, nor are death certificates. In New York City, Juan Cruz had been awaiting trial in jail for two years when he died of Covid-19 in June 2020. On May 1,2020, Mr. Cruz, who had pleaded not guilty on a sexual assault charge, tested positive for the virus while he was in the Rikers Island jail complex, court records show. Within days, he was transferred to the jail ward of Bellevue Hospital and shackled to his bed frame. On May 12, he was placed on a ventilator, court records show. Mr. Cruz’s lawyers eventually convinced officials to release Mr. Cruz because of the severity of his illness. His handcuffs were removed, and he was taken to a different wing of the hospital. He died there of Covid-19 three weeks later. Jail authorities in New York City say they have not counted the death of Mr. Cruz among its Covid-19 fatalities because Mr. Cruz was not in custody when he died. After The Times raised Mr. Cruz’s circumstances with New York officials, along with several other deaths not included in jail counts, a spokesman for Mayor Bill de Blasio said the administration would be more straightforward about disclosing Covid-19 deaths like Mr. Cruz’s in the future. In Marion County, Fla., Mr. Williamson, who was awaiting trial on charges of sexual battery on a child, had struggled with ailments long before he got the virus. He had suffered three strokes, had congestive heart failure and was nearly blind, said Chris Williamson, his son. By July 2020, after nine months in jail, Mr. Williamson had been hospitalized for Covid-19 and was on a ventilator, his son said. When his condition further deteriorated, prosecutors dropped the charges — officially releasing him from custody — because they knew he was unlikely to survive. Mr. Williamson died in the hospital a few weeks later, and was not included in the county jail’s Covid-19 toll. “It’s kind of that gray area,” Mr. Williamson’s son said, “where they can legitimately say that they’ve had no Covid-19 deaths because maybe no one’s actually died inside of the jail with Covid-19 — because they sent him to the hospital to die.”
Chinese Border Town Locked Down After 21 COVID Cases Reported in 3 Days
newsweek.com
Illinois COVID Update: IL reports 462 cases,6 deaths
abc7chicago.com

 

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86.9
Second man charged in shooting death of pregnant Fayetteville woman
(2.09/48)

Fayetteville, N. C. — A second man was arrested Wednesday in the fatal shooting of a pregnant woman in Fayetteville two months ago, police said. Sincere Perry,19, of Fayetteville, was charged with first-degree murder, murder of an unborn child, attempted first-degree murder, two counts of robbery with a dangerous weapon, two counts of first-degree kidnapping, assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury, felony conspiracy, possession of a stolen motor vehicle and injury to real property. He was being held without bond in the Cumberland County jail. Officers responding to a report of gunshots in the 800 block of Ridge Road on May 17 found 22-year-old Ashanti Bellamy and a man wounded in the street. Bellamy, of Spring Lake, and her unborn child, were pronounced dead at Cape Fear Valley Medical Center, while the man, whose name hasn't been released, was treated and released. Raymond Earl Holmes Jr.,41, of Fayetteville, was arrested 10 days later in connection with Bellamy's death. Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to call Detective J. Arnold of the Fayetteville Police Department at 910-824-9539 or Crime Stoppers at 910-483-TIPS.
24-year-old man shot and killed, woman injured in barricaded gunman situation
eu.freep.com
Prosecutors won’t seek death penalty for man charged in Pop Smoke’s killing
pagesix.com

 

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2.5
Teen Sentenced in 'Terrible' Death of Uber Eats Driver
(2.05/48)

(Newser) – Both teens who pleaded guilty in connection with a March 23 carjacking that ended in the death of an Uber Eats driver will be placed in juvenile detention until they turn 21—the maximum sentence allowed, reports NBC News. Prosecutors said the Maryland girls, then ages 13 and 15, asked 66-year-old Mohammad Anwar for a ride near the Navy Yard-Ballpark Metro station, only to pull a stun gun on him a few blocks later, near Nationals Park, and try to take control of his Honda Accord. The car ultimately slammed into other vehicles and a tree and flipped. Anwar died at a nearby hospital. The 15-year-old pleaded guilty to felony murder in May and was sentenced in June, the same month in which the younger teen pleaded guilty to second-degree murder. The Washington Post reports lawyers for the girl, now 14, had asked that she just be placed with DC's Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services until she turned 18, but DC Superior Court Judge Lynn Leibovitz on Tuesday said the teen required "very intensive services." During her sentencing Leibovitz called the incident "terrible and devastating" and one that Anwar's family would never get over, reports NBC Washington. The girl reportedly sobbed while in court, telling Leibovitz, "I never meant to do it.... I will change." (Read more Uber Eats stories.)
Girl Sentenced in Carjacking Murder of Washington, D. C. Uber Eats Driver Mohammad Anwar
lawandcrime.com
Teen girls sentenced for D. C. carjacking that led to Uber Eats driver’s death
nydailynews.com

 

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0.2
Two more men arrested in Massachusetts standoff are arraigned
(2.04/48)

MEDFORD, Mass. — Two more people charged in connection with an armed standoff along a Massachusetts highway last weekend were arraigned on Wednesday under heavy security. The defendants,10 men and a 17-year-old juvenile, say they are members of a group called Rise of the Moors, and are not subject to federal or state laws. Not guilty pleas to firearms and other charges were entered on behalf of Conrad Pierre, and another man who has so far refused to identify himself to authorities and is referred to in court documents as John Doe 2. Pierre,29, of Baldwin, New York, was held without bail pending a hearing Friday to determine whether he is a danger to society after claiming he does not fall under the court’s jurisdiction. Several members of the group during sometimes contentious arraignments Tuesday that were often interrupted by their supporters have similar hearings scheduled for Friday. Pierre’s court-appointed attorney questioned whether probable cause exists to charge him with the gun offenses. Many members of the group refused the help of public defenders when offered on Tuesday. The judge delayed the completion of John Doe 2’s arraignment until Friday, at which time he’ll be required to provide identifying information to the court. The standoff started just after 1 a.m. Saturday on Interstate 95 in Wakefield when a State Police trooper stopped to offer assistance to two vehicles parked on the side of the highway to refuel. The men, who were dressed in military-style clothing and body armor and were armed with long guns and pistols, did not have licenses to carry firearms in Massachusetts, police said. The self-described leader of the group said they were a militia traveling from Rhode Island to Maine for “training” on private land, although the exact nature of the training remains unclear, according to the police report. Several members of the group ran into woods, starting an hourslong standoff and forcing the shutdown of a major Boston-area highway during the busy holiday weekend. The standoff ended peacefully without gunfire when members of the group surrendered after negotiations. State police say they recovered three AR-15 rifles, two pistols, a bolt-action rifle, a shotgun and a short-barrel rifle and ammunition on Saturday. A court-authorized search of the vehicles turned up at least eight more guns, including handguns, rifles and a shotgun, many of them loaded, as well as hundreds of rounds of ammunition, and other equipment. Rise of the Moors, based in Rhode Island, contend they are “foreign nationals” and outside the authority of the U. S. government. Even though the Southern Poverty Law Center says the group is part of a Moorish sovereign citizen movement, the group says on its website that they are not sovereign citizens, but the original sovereigns of the U. S. based on a 1789 letter from George Washington to the sultan of Morocco. Comments are not available on this story. Send questions/comments to the editors.
2 more men arrested during Massachusetts standoff arraigned
abcnews.go.com
2 more men arrested during Massachusetts standoff arraigned
wtop.com

 

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0.4
Zack Snyder Sets Netflix Movie ‘Rebel Moon,’ Based on Rejected ‘Star Wars’ Pitch
(2.04/48)

Zack Snyder ‘s collaboration with Netflix is flying off to a galaxy far, far away. The Justice League director has set his next project at the streamer, an epic sci-fi fantasy titled Rebel Moon that he is co-writing, directing, and producing. Netflix was the home of his most recent hit, Army of the Dead, a zombie apocalypse film, and it appears that more action is in store for the pairing. Snyder will co-write Rebel Moon with Army co-screenwriter Shay Hatten and Kurt Johnstad, who co-wrote Snyder’s legendary 300, set in Ancient Greece. He will produce with wife and producing partner Deborah Snyder via the duo’s Stone Quarry, along with Wesley Coller. Eric Newman, a longtime collaborator with Snyder, will produce via his Grand Electric Banner, with Sara Bowen also attached to executive produced. Per The Hollywood Reporter, the film will take place “when a peaceful colony on the edge of the galaxy is threatened by the armies of a tyrannical regent named Balisarius. Desperate people dispatch a young woman with a mysterious past to seek out warriors from neighboring planets to help them make a stand.” “This is me growing up as an Akira Kurosawa fan, a Star Wars fan,” Snyder told The Hollywood Reporter . “It’s my love of sci-fi and a giant adventure. My hope is that this also becomes a massive IP and a universe that can be built out.” Rebel Moon sprouted from a rejected Star Wars pitch the filmmaker developed a decade ago. After the Walt Disney Company acquired LucasFilm in 2012, the project didn’t move beyond any meaningful conversations. At one point, Snyder and Newman nearly attempted to make it into a series. Still, they persisted in creating a feature film, and Netflix has hopped on board. Snyder reworked the idea with Johnstad as he was creating Army of the Dead, with the co-writer of that film, Hatten, attached to assist. Hatten has become a sought-after writer in Hollywood after developing the world of John Wick in the saga’s third, fourth, and fifth installments for Lionsgate. Stay tuned for more updates on Rebel Moon and Snyder’s other upcoming projects.
Zack Snyder to direct sci-fi adventure 'Rebel Moon' for Netflix
upi.com
Zack Snyder’s New Movie ‘Rebel Moon’ Is Described As A ‘More Mature’ Version Of ‘Star Wars’
dailycaller.com

 

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4.9
Four Dogs Maul 77-Year-Old Woman to Death in Arizona
(2.04/48)

An elderly woman has died after she was attacked by several dogs in Arizona, according to reports. According to Phoenix-based ABC15, police said they raced to the woman's home in the area of 6th Street and Broadway Road, in Phoenix, just after 7 a.m. Tuesday morning following reports of a dog attack. The outlet added that when officers arrived they found Maria Ruiz,77, in a critical condition. Police said she was taken to a nearby hospital where she died from her injuries. Investigators later learned Ruiz had been on her front porch when four Staffordshire Terrier mix dogs attacked and killed Ruiz. The mixed-breed dogs belonged to Alejandro Hernandez,33, according to the news outlet. ABC15 reported that Hernandez had been previously contacted by the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control (MCACC) about his dogs escaping from his home and was told at least once that he needed to fix a gate in order to keep them secure. He was also issued with license warnings over the dogs. The news outlet said that MCACC employees had since captured the dogs, while the police took Hernandez into custody. Officials said that one dog had been tested for rabies. It was not clear what the result of the test was. Phoenix police said Hernandez had told them his dogs had escaped several times before and that they had chased after and bitten neighbors, according to ABC15. He was reportedly booked on one count of negligent homicide. According to Arizona law, a dog owner could become subject to either class 1, class 3 or class 5 felonies if their pet escapes and, or bites, another person. The tragic death comes after a series of harrowing dog attacks were recorded across the country. In June, a 7-year-old boy was mauled and killed by at least one dog, according to the Marion County Sheriff's Office in South Carolina. Another troubling case was reported in New Jersey in June when a 3-year-old boy was mauled to death by several dogs after he fell out of a window of his home. A third case happened that month when a FedEx driver in Illinois was mauled by dogs and needed to have his arm amputated following the attack.
77-year-old woman dies after being attacked by dogs on front porch
nypost.com
77-Year-Old Woman Mauled By Dogs While Sitting On Front Steps
dailycaller.com

 

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3.9
Thousands protest in Spain after man killed in suspected homophobic attack; 3 suspects arrested
(1.15/48)

Three people have been arrested in connection to the death of Samuel Luiz, a 24-year-old man who was beaten to death in northwestern Spain during Pride weekend. The attack sparked global outcry, condemnation by Spanish leaders and protests in dozens of Spanish cities early this week after friends of Luiz said he was targeted for being gay. Spain’s Policía Nacional announced Tuesday three people, between ages 20 and 25, were arrested amid the ongoing investigation. Luiz's friends told El Mundo multiple suspects attacked Luiz early Saturday as he left a nightclub in A Coruña, a city in northwestern Spain’s Galicia region. Luiz's friends told the newspaper they were on a video call with Luiz, and the suspects believed he was trying to record them. The friends said the attackers yelled a homophobic slur at Luiz. Emergency services tried to save Luiz for two hours, but he died at a local hospital. Police are reviewing surveillance cameras and have questioned more than a dozen suspects and witnesses, José Minones, the government’s delegate in the region, told reporters. “We are at the early stages," Minones said. "Only the investigation will tell us whether it was a homophobic crime or not." Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez described the attack as a "savage and depraved act," according to El País. He voiced solidarity with those affected by Luiz's death on Twitter alongside a banner saying, "Justicia Por Samuel." "I trust that the police investigation will soon find the authors of the killing of Samuel and establish the facts,” Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said on Twitter, according to El País . "We will not take a step backward in rights and liberties. Spain will not tolerate it." Social rights minister Ione Belarra offered her condolences to Luiz's loved ones on Sunday. "We want a country free of violence where everybody feels free to be who they are," Belarra tweeted. The hashtags #JusticiaParaSamuel and #JusticeForSamuel have been trending on Twitter in Spain and around the world. Thousands of people filled a square in A Coruña to demand justice for Luiz, El País reported. In Madrid, thousands more protested in the central Puerta del Sol square. “We are here for Samuel, not just for him, but for everyone who has suffered or could suffer homophobic assaults,” shouted Diego Rubia,21, according to El País. Fundación Triángulo, one of the groups organizing protests, shared a statement Monday speaking out against "structural violence" against the LGBTQ community. "Terror, anguish, fear. That’s what Samuel must have felt before dying. What his friends felt when they witnessed the event and his family when they received the news," the statement said. "Terror, anguish and fear is what we feel as we concentrate ourselves this afternoon in hundreds of localities in Spain to show our indignation and disgust from Samuel’s death." "Samuel, make no mistake about it, YOUR MEMORY WILL ALWAYS BE IN OUR FIGHT," the statement added. The attack came just days after Spain's annual Pride celebrations and the approval of a bill allowing anyone over the age of 14 to change their gender on official documents without requiring hormone treatment or a medical report. Spain is considered one of the top five most accepting countries toward the LGBTQ community, according to a 2019 report from the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy. The other countries in the top five include Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway and Canada. Contact News Now Reporter Christine Fernando at cfernando@usatoday.com or follow her on Twitter at @christinetfern .
Spanish police arrest three over suspected homophobic killing
edition.cnn.com
Spanish police arrest three over suspected homophobic killing
edition.cnn.com

 

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0.3
Nandigram poll results: Calcutta HC judge recuses himself, fines Mamata Banerjee Rs 5 lakh
(1.09/48)

Calcutta High Court Justice Kausik Chanda on Wednesday recused himself from hearing West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee’s plea challenging the Assembly election results in Nandigram, the constituency from which she contested, reported Bar and Bench. However, the court fined the chief minister Rs 5 lakh for the way in which she sought the judge’s recusal. On June 24, Banerjee had moved a petition in the Calcutta High Court seeking Chanda’s recusal from hearing her plea. In her plea, Banerjee cited “likelihood of bias”, claiming that Chanda was associated with the Bharatiya Janata Party during his days as a lawyer. Chanda said that when he first took up the case on June 18, there was no request for his recusal. However, he said that after the hearing, Trinamool Congress leaders put up posts on Twitter about his association with the Bharatiya Janata Party. “I am unable to convince myself that there is a conflict of interest,” Chanda said during pronouncement of the order on Wednesday, reported Live Law . “The applicant has taken too somber a view of [the] integrity of a judge. I have no personal inclination to hear out the petitioner’s case. I have no hesitation in taking up this case either. It is my constitutional duty to hear out a case assigned to me by the chief justice.” Chanda said that a judge also has voting rights and political leanings like any other citizen. However, previous associations of a judge could not be considered as apprehension of bias as it would lead to “bench hunting”, he added. Following the observations, Chanda stepped aside from the proceedings in the case, noting that “trouble-mongers will try to keep the controversy alive” if he did not recuse himself from the matter. The court ordered that the fine amount would have to be deposited with the West Bengal Bar Council within two weeks. The money would be used for families of lawyers who died due to Covid-19, the court said, according to Bar and Bench. The West Bengal chief minister had lost the Nandigram Assembly seat to Bharatiya Janata Party leader Suvendu Adhikari, her former close aide who had joined the saffron party before the elections. On June 17, Banerjee had moved the Calcutta High Court, challenging the Nandigram election result. After Chanda was rostered to hear the petition, Banerjee wrote to Calcutta High Court Acting Chief Justice Rajesh Bindal requesting him to reassign the petition. The letter stated that Justice Chanda was an active member of the BJP before he became a judge, and this could lead to bias. Banerjee’s counsel had cited tweets by Trinamool Congress MP Derek O’Brien and lawyer Prashant Bhushan, where Chanda could be seen participating in meetings of the BJP. Justice Chanda had confirmed that the pictures were of him. Chanda had, however, pointed out that his decision on the matter could be seen as “giving in to media trial”, as the matter of his reported association with the BJP was already being reported by news outlets. There was massive confusion surrounding the results of the seat on the day of the counting on May 2. The confusion emerged after it was reported around 4.30 pm that Banerjee had won the seat by a margin of 1,200 votes though the counting of votes was under progress. Later, the Election Commission declared that Adhikari had defeated Banerjee by a margin of 1,956 votes. Banerjee had then alleged “looting and cheating” in the counting process. The Trinamool Congress had sought to recount votes – a request the Election Commission denied. Banerjee had said that she will move the court against the result.
Calcutta HC imposes fine of Rs 5 lakhs on Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee
business-standard.com
Nandigram plea: Judge exits case, imposes Rs 5-lakh fine on Mamata
business-standard.com
Delhi HC criticises Juhi Chawla’s plea challenging Rs 20 lakh fine for petition against 5G
scroll.in

 

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0.2
Rudy Giuliani’s Legal Defense Fund Is Not Going Well
(1.08/48)

In the wake of 9/11, Rudy Giuliani was nicknamed “America’s Mayor” and honored as Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for the strength he showed in the face of a global tragedy. The 20 years since have not been kind to the former mayor of New York City. Most recently, his close friendship and business and political association with Donald Trump have cost Giuliani any political clout he may have ever had, not to mention his right to practice law in the state of New York —and it’s about to start costing him money right out of his very own sloppily tailored pockets. Good thing his pal Bernard Kerik stepped in… or is it? In late June, Kerik—who served as New York City’s police commissioner while Rudy was still mayor, but was later sentenced to four years in prison due to a number of felony charges, including failure to pay taxes (fortunately, Trump pardoned him)— set up The Rudy Giuliani Defense Fund (though the website is called The Rudy Giuliani Freedom Fund—yes it’s real, now stop laughing) to help his fellow reprobate pay his quickly mounting legal fees. In an attempt to assist ⁦ @RudyGiuliani ⁩ to defend himself from frivolous lawsuits, a weaponized Justice Department, and the New York Bar, we have created the Rudy Giuliani Freedom Fund. This is the official Defense Fund for this American Patriot. https://t.co/m7cN3A4MmN Bernard B. Kerik (@BernardKerik) June 26, 2021 The goal, according to the website? To raise $5 million to help the man whose “fate will determine if America still is a Republic governed by We The People, or if the swamp has finally amassed total control of our great country.” Yet as of Tuesday, as noted by Vanity Fair, the crowdfunding campaign had so far earned a total of just $9,590—which is less than .2 percent of its goal. And almost $46,000 less than some random dude once raised just to make some potato salad (seriously, stop laughing). While Giuliani showed some pretty dogged dedication in doing anything and everything he could to make Trump look good, the former president reportedly couldn’t give two sh*ts about his former BFF. According to Michael Wolff’s new book Landslide: The Final Days of the Trump Presidency, Trump began to sour on Rudy toward the end of his presidency, when Giuliani had the audacity to ask Trump to finally be paid for all the work he has done for him. Paid?! For work?!? How dare he!! “Trump is annoyed that [Rudy] tried to get paid for his election challenge work,” writes Wolff—never mind the fact that Rudy was just about the only person who stuck by Trump throughout the 2020 presidential election and the pathetic battle to contest its results. Of course, there were some shady shenanigans around that whole thing, too, with a Giuliani associate admitting that he attempted to bill Trump $20,000 per day for Rudy’s help. “To be fair,” writes VF ’s Bess Levin, “Giuliani probably should have seen this coming, given that Trump is famously known for stiffing his contractors, from dishwashers to painters to architects, and when confronted about it saying things like, ‘Maybe he didn’t do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work.’” (Via Vanity Fair)
Rudy Giuliani suspended from practicing law in DC
ocregister.com

 

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1.7
Owner of venom-spitting cobra that escaped in Raleigh faces 40 misdemeanor charges
(1.07/48)

CBS 17 reporter runs into missing venom-spitting snake on Raleigh home’s porch Find out first — Get the latest breaking news from FOX8 sent straight to your inbox. Find out first — Get the latest breaking news from FOX8 sent straight to your inbox.
Trooper from Guilford County accused of transferring firearms to felon
myfox8.com
Zebra cobra's owner faces charges in deadly snake's months-long escape
wral.com
Zebra cobra's owner faces charges following deadly snake's months-long escape
wral.com

 

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1.1
New York declares US's first 'disaster emergency' on gun crime as shooting deaths overtake COVID
(1.07/48)

New York's governor has declared America's first state of emergency on gun violence, saying it's now claiming more lives than COVID-19. Andrew Cuomo committed to spending at least $138.7m (£100.5m) on intervention programmes to tackle the gun violence crisis and announced a new strategy to "build a safer New York ". Speaking at John Jay College of Criminal Justice on Tuesday, Mr Cuomo said at least 51 people were shot in the state over the fourth of July weekend, and only 13 died of COVID-19. "Treat gun violence as it is which is really a public health emergency, that's what it is and that's how we are going to treat it," he said. "So today, the first state in the nation is going to declare a disaster emergency on gun violence. "If you look at the recent numbers, more people are now dying from gun violence and crime than COVID - this is a national problem but someone has to step up and address this problem because our future depends on it." He added: "This is the state, when it sees an injustice, we don't look the other way, we stand up and we fight it and that's what we are going to do with gun violence." Declaring disaster emergency status allows the state to expedite money and resources to communities so they can begin "targeting gun violence immediately." The governor released a slide during the news conference outlining seven key strategies the state plans to take to address the problem. While some of the steps were wide-ranging such as treating gun violence "like the public health issue it is" or keeping "guns out of the hands of dangerous people", others were more detailed - including "positive engagement for at-risk youth" and getting "illegal guns off the streets". Follow the Daily podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Spreaker The governor's plan will also see the launch of a new police unit to intercept illegal guns from coming into the state, and a $76m (£55m) fund used to create jobs and community activities for at-risk youth. Mr Cuomo also created an executive order, requiring all major police departments to share incident-level data on gun violence with the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, to identify "gun violence hotspots", in a similar way to how the state has been tracking COVID-19 cases. Initial hotspots identified in New York City, Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, and Long Island include 4,090 young men aged 18-24, who account for 48.5% of recent gun violence in those communities, according to the governor. Resources would then be deployed to the areas worst affected. The most recent weekly data from the New York Police Department (NYPD) shows 2,337 gun arrests have been made citywide since the beginning of this year, with Kings County recording the highest number with 992. However, the NYPD's citywide crime statistics show 165 shooting incidents were recorded in June, which is a 19.5% decrease compared to the same time last year when 205 incidents were reported.
The US is seeing a summer surge in gun violence. New York just declared an emergency.
usatoday.com

 

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1.5
Celebrity Deaths in 2021: Stars We’ve Lost
(1.06/48)

It’s never easy to say goodbye. Larry King, Christopher Plummer and Cecily Tyson are among the celebrities who died in 2021, leaving those in their wake heartbroken. Dustin Diamond died on February 1 at age 44 after a battle with stage IV small cell carcinoma. “He was diagnosed with this brutal, relentless form of malignant cancer only three weeks ago. In that time, it managed to spread rapidly throughout his system; the only mercy it exhibited was its sharp and swift execution,” his rep told Us Weekly in a statement at the time. “Dustin did not suffer. He did not have to lie submerged in pain. For that, we are grateful.” The actor’s Saved by the Bell costars paid tribute to him after news of his death. “I’m deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Dustin Diamond, a true comedic genius. My sincere condolences to his family and friends,” Mark-Paul Gosselaar told Us in a statement. “Looking back at our time working together, I will miss those raw, brilliant sparks that only he was able to produce. A pie in your face, my comrade.” Mario Lopez, meanwhile, wrote via Instagram: “Dustin, you will be missed my man. The fragility of this life is something never to be taken for granted. Prayers for your family will continue on.” Tiffani Thiessen echoed Lopez’s sentiments in an Instagram post of her own. “I am deeply saddened by the news of my old co-star @realdustindiamond passing,” she captioned a photo of Diamond. “Life is extremely fragile and it’s something we should never take for granted. God speed Dustin.” Later that month, fans lost an iconic figure in Christopher Plummer, who died at age 91. “Chris was an extraordinary man who deeply loved and respected his profession with great old fashion manners, self deprecating humor and the music of words,” his longtime manager said in a statement to Us on February 5. “He was a National Treasure who deeply relished his Canadian roots. Through his art and humanity, he touched all of our hearts and his legendary life will endure for all generations to come. He will forever be with us.” The Oscar winner’s Sound of Music costar Julie Andrews honored him after his death . “The world has lost a consummate actor today. And I have lost a cherished friend,” the actress told Us in a statement. “I treasure the memories of our work together and all the humor and fun we shared through the years. My heart and condolences go out to his lovely wife Elaine, and his daughter Amanda.” Scroll down to see Us ’ tribute to the celebrities who died in 2021. Hear the Us Weekly editors break down the most surprising celebrity births during the pandemic in under 2 minutes!
Celebrities At The 2021 Cannes Film Festival
forbes.com

 

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0.5
Religion and the Capitol Attack
(1.04/48)

Michelle Boorstein, WaPo religion reporter, provides a fascinating if anecdotal picture in her report “ A horn-wearing ‘shaman.’ A cowboy evangelist. For some, the Capitol attack was a kind of Christian revolt.” Late last month, one of the accused Jan.6 Capitol insurrectionists told a D. C. judge that she didn’t recognize his authority and was making a “divine special appearance.” Another one of the accused streams a solo religious service each week that he calls “Good Morning Sunday Morning.” A third runs a 65,000-subscriber YouTube channel where she shares Bible verses and calls herself a “healer of deep inner wounds.” Pauline Bauer, Stephen Baker and Jenna Ryan were among the thousands who descended on the Capitol in protest of what they falsely called a stolen election, including some who saw themselves engaged in a spiritual war. For many, their religious beliefs were not tied to any specific church or denomination — leaders of major denominations and megachurches, and even President Donald Trump’s faith advisers, were absent that day. For such people, their faith is individualistic, largely free of structures, rules or the approval of clergy. Many forces contributed to the attack on the Capitol, including Trump’s false claims of electoral victory and American anger with institutions. But part of the mix, say experts on American religion, is the fact that the country is in a period when institutional religion is breaking apart, becoming more individualized and more disconnected from denominations, theological credentials and oversight. That has created room for what Yale University sociologist Phil Gorski calls a religious “melee, a free for all.” “There have been these periods of breakdowns and ferment and reinvention in the past, and every indication is we’re in the middle of one of those now,” he said. “Such moments are periods of opportunity and creativity but also of danger and violence.” Some scholars see this era as a spiritually fertile period, like the ones that produced Pentecostalism or Mormonism. Others worry about religious illiteracy and the lack of supervision over everything from theological pronouncements to financial practices. Even before Jan.6, some sociologists said the fastest-growing group of American Christians are those associated with independent “prophets” who largely operate outside denominationalism. Less than half of Americans told Gallup in March that they belonged to a congregation, the first time that has happened since Gallup started asking in the 1930s. Many Christians at the Capitol on Jan.6 were part of more conventional, affiliated faith, including pastors, Catholic priests and bused-in church groups. But what researchers studying Jan.6 find remarkable are the leaderless, idiosyncratic expressions of religion that day. Among them are those of Bauer, who wrote to a judge last month that she’s a “free living soul” and an “ambassador of Christ,” and of Jake Chansley, the “QAnon Shaman” who prayed to Christ at a dais in the Senate and calls himself a “multidimensional being.” “Those who are unmoored to a local church body are subject to the danger of allowing politics or business or sports or any other matter to become an inordinate focus of their lives. This problem is compounded by the effort to ‘bless’ such actions with a religious patina,” Adam W. Greenway, president of Southwestern Baptist, one of the seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention, told The Washington Post of the trend of DIY Christianity. “Pastors help their members keep matters in perspective and avoid Lone Ranger Christianity in which they are unaccountable to fellow believers.” Some have found in recent years a growing overlap between White Americans who put a high value on individualism and libertarianism and those who embrace Christian nationalism, a cultural belief that America is defined by Christian identity, heritage and social order and that the government needs to protect it. They are now looking at the way Trump’s presidency united disparate groups — largely White— under the umbrella of Christian nationalism. But Christian nationalists are not necessarily religious by conventional metrics, such as going to church, being part of a religious organization or scripture reading. Several studies in recent years have found differences between Christian nationalists who are religious and those who are less so. Americans who have Christian-nationalist beliefs who do not attend church are more likely to have voted for and support Trump, compared with those who attend more regularly, said Paul Froese, a sociologist at Baylor University who published a paper on the topic in January. For such people, Froese’s paper says, affirming a kind of “mythical or even sacred” Christian nationalism can become a key part of their religious observance, one that comes from sources outside traditional church. “You have people who have these idiosyncratic relationships with God — you’re sort of taking off on your own,” Froese told The Post. “You can say, ‘God told me whatever.'” Robert Pape, a University of Chicago political scientist who studies political violence, said his research on the Jan.6 insurrectionists suggests what he has seen with other extremist movements: Where religion plays a role, it’s not due to deep indoctrination or education. Such individuals “tend to have a thin knowledge and understanding of their religion,” Pape said. “Recruits tend to be making individual decisions about the ideologies they want to follow and even what it means. It’s very much at the level of the individual.” What’s not evident from this report is how many of the 500-odd people charged with crimes in relation to the 6 January Capitol attack were Christian Identity folks. Was it a predominant characteristic of the group? Or a mere handful? My strong guess is that it’s the latter and that Boorstein is straining to view the attack through a religious lens. Indeed, the cited report by Samuel Stroope, Paul Froese, Heather M. Rackin, and Jack Delehanty is an analysis of Trump voters in the 2016 election and has no mention of the Capitol attacks; indeed, it was likely submitted to the peer review process long before that incident. The abstract: Prior research found that Christian nationalism was strongly associated with voting for Trump in the 2016 U. S. presidential election. However, the effects of Christian nationalism may depend on voters’ religiosity. Using national data, we assess whether the association between Christian nationalism and Trump support differed for churchgoers and nonchurchgoers and find that Christian nationalism is not significantly associated with Trump support among churchgoing voters. Instead, Christian nationalism is only significantly associated with Trump support among unchurched voters. These results suggest that while religious sentiments remain key correlates of political attitudes and behavior in the United States, these ties may have less to do with embeddedness in traditional religious organizations and more to do with the ways people use religious narratives in everyday life to construct and defend symbolic boundaries. At a time when fewer Americans attend religious services, religious narratives about Christian nationhood may have their strongest political effects when, and perhaps because, they are detached from religious institutions. The Pape report, by contrast, focused on the Capitol attack but hardly says anything at all about religion. It is almost entirely about white fears of a Great Replacement by Blacks and non-white Hispanics. Additionally, his team found that the early group of those arrested are quite different from those arrested in other rightwing violence: they were much less likely to be associated with a known militia or gang, they were much more likely to be from a county that voted for Biden, they were older, and they were relatively well off socioeconomically. Turning to the larger society, Pape’s team found that, while 74 million Americans (29%) believe the election was stolen, “only” 10 million (4%) believe violence is justified to rectify the situation. What separated that 4% from the rest? Far and away the biggest drivers were a belief in the Great Replacement and the consumption of more than 7 hours of social media on a daily basis. Indeed, the latter by a factor of 632%. Conversely, they were only modestly more likely to be Christian but, surprisingly considerably less likely to believe the End Times were near. The bottom line, then, is that, while there seems to be good reason to believe that there is less adherence to traditional religious denominations and an increase in those looking for something to replace that, there’s not much evidence that this has much at all to do with the riots. The only actual study cited of the rioters, in fact, found that it was a mobilization by then-President Trump of people who spent a lot of time on social media who believed in a Great Replacement.
Hunt for Capitol attackers still on 6 months after Jan.6
myfox8.com

 

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2.6
Cleveland man charged with threatening to kill Nancy Pelosi
(1.03/48)

A Cleveland man has been charged with threatening to kill House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for “committing treason” against the US, court documents show. David Staudohar,53, called police departments in Texas, California and Kentucky in November detailing his plans to kill a congresswoman whose name was redacted from an affidavit filed Tuesday, Cleveland.com reported. The filing, however, reportedly indicates that Pelosi,81, was Staudohar’s alleged target, beginning with three calls made just hours apart on Nov.13 – six days after Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump to become the nation’s 46th president. Staudohar, who is retired and identified himself as a veteran during one call, first contacted police in St. Helena, Calif., where Pelosi owns a home and vineyard, Cleveland.com reported. “I want to let you know that I’m gonna be landing in the Stockton, California, airport,” Staudohar said, the affidavit shows. “I’m coming up there for a… vengeance.” Staudohar then allegedly called cops in Louisville, Ky., hours later, claiming to have ordered a “hit” in Washington. He also called police in Dallas, according to the affidavit. “I’m a self-made man, and I have ordered a hit,” Staudohar allegedly told a Dallas cop. “I ordered two bullets to be put in her head.” Staudohar then called St. Helena police again on June 24, claiming in an expletive-filled rant that he had a pair of brass knuckles he planned to use to assault the congresswoman, WEWS-TV reported. “You tell that dirty f—–g c— I’m gonna work her over with brass knuckles,” Staudohar said, the affidavit shows. “By the time I’m done with her, her face is gonna look a f—–g 10-pound bag of hamburger.” Staudohar identified himself as a “veteran and a patriot” on the call while allegedly insisting that the Democratic Party was “overthrowing” America, the station reported. “And by the time, I’m done… I gonna beat [the congresswoman] to death with brass knuckles,” Staudohar continued, according to the affidavit. Records reportedly show that all of the calls were made from Cleveland. Staudohar, who has been charged with interstate threatening communications, faces up to five years in prison if convicted, WEWS-TV reported. Staudohar was formally charged Tuesday. He told a judge he was retired and living on a $691-per-month pension and food stamps before being ordered held without bond until a July 13 detention hearing, according to Cleveland.com. Messages left for a spokesman for Pelosi and a federal public defender for Staudohar were not returned Tuesday, the website reported.
Prosecutors won’t seek death penalty for man charged in Pop Smoke’s killing
pagesix.com

 

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1.1
Death of Bay Area man at Lake Oroville investigated as murder
(1.03/48)

I spent the Fourth in the thick of Tahoe's chaos. It got weird. Woman,75, suffers life-threatening injuries when SF shoplifter knocks... Book alleges bad Kimberly Guilfoyle behavior at GOP fundraisers 3 bodies found at San Mateo County beaches in 3 days Chesa Boudin aide's 'Birth of a Nation' tweet ignites firestorm San Francisco is forever dying How this next West Coast heat wave will differ from the last one Bruce Lee's daughter writes scathing op-ed to Quentin Tarantino This $140K Bay Area 'dream job' is hiring again Video shows 10 people dashing out of SF Neiman Marcus with purses The South Pacific islands you should visit instead of Hawaii Horoscope for Wednesday,7/07/21 by Christopher Renstrom Joshua Bote is a news reporter for SFGATE. He grew up in the Los Angeles area, went to UC Berkeley and has previously worked as a reporter at USA Today and a music writer at NPR. Email: joshua.bote@sfgate.com
Prosecutors won’t seek death penalty for man charged in Pop Smoke’s killing
pagesix.com

 

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1.4
Trump says 'no reason' for officer to shoot rioter, pushing conspiracy theory
(1.02/48)

Former President Trump claimed on Wednesday that there was “no reason” for a rioter to be shot during the Jan.6 insurrection on the Capitol. Trump brought up the rioter, Ashli Babbitt, after he was asked what he had done to stop the attack on the Capitol and why he couldn’t stop it. Trump was impeached for inciting a mob to attack the Capitol, though the Senate did not have a supermajority to convict him. Trump called the event “unfortunate” but claimed that people “are being treated unbelievably unfairly.” He said left-wing protesters in antifa, a frequent Trump target, were allowed to get away with worse before turning to Babbitt. Babbitt was shot and killed by an unidentified Capitol Police officer as she and other members of the mob attacking the Capitol on Jan.6 stood feet from where lawmakers were taking cover in the House chamber. An officer shot Babbitt after she tried to enter the Speaker's Gallery just off the House floor after members of the mob had smashed through a window to a door outside the gallery. “But the person that shot Ashli Babbitt, boom, right through the head, just boom, there was no reason for that. And why isn't that person being opened up, and why isn't that being studied? They've already written it off. They said that case is closed,” Trump said during a press event in Bedminster, N. J., scheduled to discuss class-action lawsuits he is filing against Facebook and Twitter. In April, the Department of Justice closed its investigation into the death of the rioter and cleared the police officer of wrongdoing. Trump also said there were no guns in the Capitol. A number of people have been charged with bringing firearms to the protests in Washington, D. C., on Jan.6. While no guns were recovered at the Capitol, authorities were focused on clearing the building after it was overrun,and not on taking weapons from people. “There were no guns in the Capitol... except for the gun that shot Ashli Babbitt, and nobody knows who that man were,” Trump said. In a statement after the officer was cleared, the Justice Department said, “The investigation revealed no evidence to establish that, at the time the officer fired a single shot at Ms. Babbitt, the officer did not reasonably believe that it was necessary to do so in self-defense or in defense of the Members of Congress and others evacuating the House Chamber.” According to The Washington Post, the law firm representing the officer said it was keeping his name confidential because he was facing death threats. Additionally, the Justice Department said that Babbitt was struck in the left shoulder, not the head.
Trump Says ‘No Reason’ For Officer To Have Shot Ashli Babbitt As He Again Downplays Jan.6 Riot
forbes.com

 

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0.4
USA Today to charge for online content
(1.02/48)

USA Today announced on Wednesday that it is putting digital content behind a paywall for the first time. Much of the outlet’s breaking news stories will still be free to readers, with premium content consisting of “exclusive investigations, sophisticated visual explainers, thought-provoking takes on the news and immersive storytelling,” the newspaper said. “This is a big change; our digital news has always been free,” said Editor-in-Chief of USA Today Nicole Carroll and Maribel Perez Wadsworth, the publisher and director of news for all of Gannett, the newspaper's parent company. “But USA Today was founded on boldness. Your subscription is an investment in quality journalism that’s worth paying for, journalism that strengthens our communities and our nation,” they said. Readers can purchase different monthly subscriptions, The New York Times reported. The first subscription starts at $4.99 and goes up to $9.99 for digital-only content. The second tier starts at $7.99 and goes up to $12.99 for digital content with no ads. The third option ranges from $9.99 to $29.95, which provides full digital access and home delivery of the print edition. USA Today receives 90 million unique readers a month, making it competitive with other outlets such as The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. All three of those publications have implemented paywalls as readership continues to shift from print to online.
USA Today Launches Paywall for Digital Content, Says Many Stories Will Remain Free
thewrap.com

 

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0.7
Pediatrician facing 98 sex charges not competent to stand trial, judge rules
(1.01/48)

A Maryland pediatrician charged with almost 100 sex crimes against children is incompetent to stand trial — partly because of his belief in an “Evil Black Witch,” a judge ruled Wednesday. Dr. Ernesto Torres,70, is accused of molesting 19 underage victims from 2001 to 2019, a disturbing crime spree that resulted in a 98-count indictment against him in December 2019. The Frederick County resident, who was already serving time for sexually assaulting a female patient in his office, is being held at a hospital while prosecutors and defense attorneys battle over his ability to stand trial. An expert psychiatrist with the Maryland Department of Health argued that Torres was competent enough to understand the nature of the proceedings. But the defendant’s psychiatrist disagreed, arguing that he was incompetent “due to a delusional disorder and belief in an Evil Black Witch,” authorities said. Circuit Court Judge Julie Stevenson Solt said both opinions were equally possible and that she could not conclude, beyond a reasonable doubt, that Torres was “presently” competent to stand trial. Prosecutors were not pleased with the ruling. “It’s very frustrating that these countless victims won’t be able to confront the Defendant and have their day in court,” Frederick County State’s Attorney Charlie Smith said in a statement . “It often provides some closure and assists in the healing process,” he said. “With this ruling, that avenue is closed. We still feel strongly that he is competent and fully understands the abuse that he inflicted.” The December 2019 indictment came just days after Torres was sentenced to a year in prison for sexually assaulting a lifelong patient who had gone to his office to discuss her anxiety medication. Additional victims came forward after that case made headlines. The court on Wednesday also ordered Torres to remain at an “appropriate hospital” under the health department’s supervision until another competency examination takes place in 90 days. He was also ordered to face annual competency reviews after that.
Former Md. pediatrician facing sex abuse charges found incompetent to stand trial
wtop.com

 

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1.0
Simone Biles opens up about sexual abuse torment: ‘Closest thing to death’
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Simone Biles is ready to share her story. In the most recent episode of her docu-series, “Simone vs. Herself,” the 24-year-old and her mother discussed when she first came to grips with the sexual abuse she suffered from former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar and the beginning stages of her healing. Biles described the moment when all her emotions about Nassar’s abuse came out and she began to sob while driving on a Texas highway as she spoke to her mother on the phone. “I just remember breaking down and calling my mom,” Biles said. “She told me to pull over. She was like, ‘Can you drive?’ because I was crying so hard.” “She was just hysterical,” Nellie Biles, her mother, said. “She didn’t say anything, she just cried, and we just cried together because I knew what it was she wanted to talk about. She didn’t have to say anything.” In 2018, Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison. Over 150 survivors of his abuse came forward to make statements. Currently, there are over 500 accusers to Nassar’s abuse. Biles initially was not among them. She did not speak about the situation with even her closest friends and family. “Talking to Simone about it, she was in denial, and she would be very angry when I would ask her anything,” Nellie Biles said. “So I just gave her space until she was ready to talk about it.” However, the trauma from the abuse and not speaking about what happened to her had negative repercussions to Biles’ mental health. Throughout this period, Biles suffered from suicidal thoughts and slept through large portions of the day. “I remember telling my mom and my agent that I slept all the time, and it’s basically because sleeping was basically better than offing myself,” she said through tears. “It was like my way to escape reality. And sleeping was the closest thing to death for me at that point, so I just slept all the time. “I was super depressed, and I didn’t want to leave my room and I didn’t want to go anywhere and I kind of just shut everybody out.” Like many other elite gymnasts, Biles trained at the now-shuttered USA Gymnastics National Team Training Center at Karolyi Ranch in Texas. Throughout the day, Biles discussed how gymnasts would travel to various stations. The last station was therapy, where Nassar abused dozens of young girls. Biles recalled telling her parents training at the ranch was not a “fun” experience and that when she was younger, she thought she had to train under those conditions. “If I had to go back to the ranch, I would probably s–t myself. There is no way I could train for another Olympic cycle under that because I am more mature, I am older, and realizing, ‘Wow, it didn’t have to be like that,” she said. “Simone vs Herself” is a seven-part docu-series streaming on Facebook Watch. It chronicles Biles’ journey to return to the Olympics, which begins July 24. In the most recent episode “What more can I say?” Biles not only discusses her abuse under Nassar, but also how she’s used her platform to champion survivors and advocate against sexual abuse. Biles struggled to come forward as a survivor of sexual abuse. She recalled “bawling” every time she tried to write, but powered through because she wanted to send a message. “I knew that it would help others, and that’s why I did it — to let them know they are not alone,” she said. Soon after she released her statement, USA Gymnastics ended its partnership with Karolyi Ranch. She then realized the power she had to make change and create a safer environment for future gymnasts. She and former Olympian and teammate Aly Raisman — who is also a survivor of Nassar’s abuse — discussed their advocacy during the episode. Biles’ mission has been to create a more inclusive world of sport. Raisman is currently suing USA Gymnastics and the U. S. Olympic Committee, accusing them of hiding Nassar’s abuse for years. Biles added that she feels pressure as she is the only survivor who still competes for USA Gymnastics and came forward about Nassar’s abuse. “Not that I am going to be punished for speaking on the inside, but I have to worry about what I say because I am still competing under [USA Gymnastics],” Biles said. To date, there are over 500 survivors — including Biles and Raisman — who have filed lawsuits against USA Gymnastics, though all the lawsuits were put on hold when USA Gymnastics filed for bankruptcy in 2019. USA Gymnastics claims that it is planning on settling with survivors and emerging out of bankruptcy this summer.
Simone Biles Tearfully Recalls The Moment She Knew She Was Sexually Abused By Larry Nassar — Watch
hollywoodlife.com

 

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0.9
REPORT: Sofia Vergara And Husband Joe Manganiello’s Mansion Vandalized, Man Arrested
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Sofia Vergara and husband Joe Manganiello’s Los Angeles mansion was reportedly vandalized and a man was arrested and booked on felony charges. “On July 4 at 6:54 p.m. officers responded to a trespass suspect,” an official with the LAPD shared with Fox News in a piece published Wednesday. The office also confirmed they were called out to a North Beverly Park region of the city on Sunday. “They detained a man and he was arrested for vandalism,” the official added. “He spray painted the exterior of the residence, causing damage to the property.” The official noted the man was arrested on scene at 8:30 p.m. and was then booked on a felony charge. The report noted, that vandalism charges can reach the level of a felony if a certain amount of damage is caused. “The extent of the damage was pretty great,” the LAPD official told the outlet. (RELATED: Sofia Vergara’s Embryo Fight Is Getting Escalated) The man reportedly caused $100,000 worth of damage, TMZ reported. The outlet noted, the suspect allegedly spray painted the home with his social media handles using orange spray paint. The “Modern Family” star and her husband were allegedly not home at the time of the incident. The 48-year-old actress ‘ post on social media from a tropical location the last few days appears to back up those claims. Sofia and Manganiello tied the knot in November 2015.
Sofia Vergara and Joe Manganiello's Los Angeles mansion vandalized, man arrested on felony charge
foxnews.com

 

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2.6
Kyle Rittenhouse’s attorney blames shooting on victim’s sex offender status
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Kyle Rittenhouse’s attorney wants to argue that one of the men the teen killed during a Wisconsin Black Lives Matter protest was a sex offender who attacked his client to try to steal his gun — because he couldn’t legally possess one himself. Rittenhouse’s attorney, Mark Richards, filed a motion last Thursday seeking permission to use Joseph Rosenbaum ‘s conviction for having sex with a minor in 2002 in his 18-year-old client’s upcoming murder trial. “It is the defense’s position that Rosenbaum sought to arm himself by stealing Mr. Rittenhouse’s weapon because he could not legally purchase a firearm due to his status as a convicted sex offender,” the motion states, according to the Kenosha News, which first reported it. “The evidence will be that Joseph Rosenbaum chased Mr. Rittenhouse through a parking lot and attempted to disarm him before being shot,” Richards said in another motion filed Thursday. Rittenhouse was just 17 when he joined militia groups protecting Kenosha during fiery riots after the police shooting of Jacob Blake last August. He has admitted shooting dead Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber as well as injuring Gaige Grosskreutz — but only while he “ exercised his right to self-defense,” his legal team argued. “There is no evidence that Mr. Rittenhouse targeted either of those individuals,” the motion said. “The evidence will show that all three men attacked Mr. Rittenhouse, and that was the reason they were shot,” the filings said. Huber and Grosskreutz were “both part of a mob” chasing Rittenhouse after the initial gunshots, and “Huber struck Rittenhouse in the head with a skateboard after Rittenhouse had his face stomped on by another man,” the filings claimed. “After Huber struck Rittenhouse with the skateboard, he attempted to grab Rittenhouse’s firearm,” the filing said, saying that “video and still photographs confirm this.” Grosskruetz was then seen “pointing a semiautomatic pistol directly at Rittenhouse when he was shot in the arm,” the motion insists. Kimberley Motley, an attorney representing Rosenbaum’s estate, rejected Richards’ theory but declined to comment further since the case against Rittenhouse remains open. “We believe strongly that Mr. Rittenhouse was the aggressor and his actions were not lawful,” she told the Associated Press on Tuesday. Richards also filed a motion to dismiss a charge that Rittenhouse couldn’t possess a gun because he was too young under Wisconsin law. He argued that statutes prohibit minors from possessing short-barreled shotguns and rifles, and Rittenhouse’s assault-style rifle doesn’t meet that definition. The defense also sought to exclude any mention of possible ties to the “Proud Boys” or the teen filmed flashing a white-power sign. “There is no evidence which links Mr. Rittenhouse to any white nationalist or hate groups on or about that time,” the filings insisted, also stressing that “there is no evidence that Mr. Rittenhouse made any racial comments to any of the individuals who attacked him.” Rittenhouse faces a slew of charges, including reckless homicide, recklessly endangering safety, attempted first-degree intentional homicide and being a minor in possession of a dangerous weapon. Kenosha County Circuit Judge Bruce Schroeder has scheduled a hearing on the motions for Sept.17.
Kyle Rittenhouse update: Attorney wants to show Kenosha shooting victim was sex offender
abc7chicago.com

 

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0.8
Prosecutor: Newspaper gunman spoke of making trial 'a farce'
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ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- The man who killed five people at a Maryland newspaper told a state psychiatrist that he intended to make “a farce” out of the second phase of his trial to determine whether he is criminally responsible due to his mental health, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Prosecutor Anne Colt Leitess referred to Jarrod Ramos' comments during her cross-examination of a mental health expert called by defense attorneys. In a case that is largely a battle between mental health experts, Leitess said Ramos told the state psychiatrist who interviewed him that he had obtained a copy of a diagnostic manual before speaking to mental health professionals to get a better understanding of how he could better present himself as mentally ill. Leitess asked Dr. Catherine Yeager, a defense witness, whether it might not be in Ramos' interest to tell her the truth during mental health screenings and evaluations, because the outcome of the case now being presented to jurors will determine whether he goes to prison or a maximum-security mental health facility. “It may not be. I don’t know," Yeager said, adding that she didn't think Ramos cared. Leitess brought up a report of Dr. Sameer Patel, a psychiatrist with the state Health Department who interviewed Ramos six times for about 20 hours and concluded Ramos was legally sane. Patel is expected to testify later in the case. Leitess noted that his report said Ramos came around to deciding to pursue a plea of not criminally responsible by reason of insanity when he learned his inevitable confinement would be better in a mental health facility than prison, partly because he would have access to a computer and the internet. Yeager has testified that her interviews with Ramos support findings that he has autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder and delusional disorder. She has testified that Ramos has had a consuming obsession that he was defamed by a newspaper article written in the Capital Gazette in 2011 about his guilty plea to harassing a former high school classmate online, an article Ramos thought wrongly made him sound insane. “The delusion is he was somehow defamed. His reputation was ruined," Yeager testified. "He could no longer be a presence in society because everyone would know he was written about as crazy.” Ramos already pleaded guilty in 2019 to 23 counts in the killings of Wendi Winters, John McNamara, Gerald Fischman, Rob Hiaasen and Rebecca Smith at the newspaper on June 28, 2018. Ramos,41, had a well-documented history of harassing the newspaper’s journalists. He filed the defamation lawsuit against the paper in 2012. The lawsuit was dismissed as groundless. Defense attorneys are presenting their case first. Their last mental health witness, Dr. Dorothy Lewis, contends Ramos is not criminally responsible due to mental illness. She is expected to testify later Wednesday or Thursday. Prosecutors will be calling expert witnesses of their own. Under Maryland’s insanity defense law, a defendant has the burden to show by a preponderance of the evidence that he is not criminally responsible for his actions. State law says a defendant is not criminally responsible for criminal conduct if, because of a mental disorder or developmental disabilities, he lacked substantial capacity to appreciate the criminality of his conduct. Judge Michael Wachs told the jury Wednesday — the sixth day of the trial — that the case could reach closing arguments by the middle of next week.
Prosecutor: Newspaper gunman Jarrod Ramos spoke of making trial ‘a farce’
washingtontimes.com

 

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0.6
Rapper Pooh Shiesty held on federal gun and robbery charges
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Rapper Pooh Shiesty is being held without bond on federal gun and robbery charges, according to a Justice Department statement on Wednesday. A Miami-based magistrate judge ordered the Tennessee-born rapper to remain in a federal detention center as he faces a pending trial after being accused of participating in a street deal that led to two men getting shot. In October, Pooh Shiesty, whose real name is Lontrell Williams, along with Bobby Brown and Jayden Darosa, drove into the parking lot of a Florida-based hotel to purchase marijuana and a pair of high-end sneakers from two other men, according to the Department of Justice statement. The defendants allegedly brought out semi-automatic weapons and shot the two individuals during the transaction, driving away from the scene in their vehicles with the items they didn’t pay for. The Miami Herald reported in June that federal authorities found a Louis Vuitton bag that contained more than $40,000 in cash at the scene. Federal authorities say that Williams flashed the designer bag on Instagram just days prior to the robbery, as well as photos of him with “several long rifles and plethora of $100.00 bills.” One of the bills in the designer bag had the same serial number he showed on his Instagram feed, according to the Herald. Williams, Brown and Darosa are each charged with “one count of conspiring to possess firearms in furtherance of a crime of violence, conspiring to commit a Hobbs Act robbery, committing a Hobbs Act robbery, and discharging a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence.” The “Back in Blood” singer is also facing additional charges stemming from a Memorial Day weekend incident in which he allegedly shot a security guard at a Miami-based strip club. Williams and Darosa made their initial federal court appearance in June. The two shooting victims have recovered from their injuries, according to the Wednesday statement.
Miami Federal Judge Orders Rapper Pooh Shiesty To Remain In Detention Center, Charged In Drug Deal Shooting
miami.cbslocal.com

 

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0.3
Report: Convicted Terrorists Led Religious Services in Federal Prisons - Washington Free Beacon
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Convicted terrorists linked to the Islamic State and al-Qaeda led religious services at one-third of the federal prisons audited by a federal watchdog, a practice officials say presents safety and security risks. The Justice Department's Office of the Inspector General found that convicts linked to the terror groups led classes at 4 out of 12 Bureau of Prisons facilities, according to a report released Wednesday. Bureau of Prisons staff members worry terror-linked inmates could use the religious services "as a method to obtain power and influence among the inmate population," the report says. The Bureau of Prisons operates 122 facilities across the United States. An al-Qaeda affiliate who was convicted on terrorism charges led religious services "on a frequent basis," the report said. The chaplain at the prison, which is not identified, told investigators that the convicted terrorist was selected by other inmates to lead the classes because of his Arab fluency and his "extensive" knowledge of Islam. Officials within the Bureau of Prisons told investigators they opposed terrorists leading the classes. But they said the agency does not have clear policies regarding who can lead the services. The inspector general determined that a "persistent" shortage of chaplains within the Bureau of Prisons has created a need to rely on inmates to lead some religious classes. The watchdog also faulted a "lack of diversity" among the religious groups represented by the agency’s chaplaincy services program. The watchdog said that the over-reliance on inmates likely creates an "unacceptable level of risk," especially when classes are led by convicted terrorists. Some U. S. lawmakers have raised concerns in the past about potential terrorist influence in religious programs at federal prisons. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa) raised concern in 2016 that the Bureau of Prisons allowed the Islamic Society of North American to assist in vetting contractors hired to lead Islamic classes at federal prisons. Grassley noted that the Islamic Society was an unindicted co-conspirator in the Holy Land Foundation terrorism case. The Bureau of Prisons told the Washington Free Beacon it is revising agency policy in order to provide clear guidance on religious services led by inmates, as well as to strengthen security measures. The agency did not address questions about which facilities house the terrorist inmates cited in the inspector general's report.
Terrorists leading prison worship services: DOJ audit
washingtontimes.com

 

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1.1
Pharmacy exec resentenced to 14 years in meningitis outbreak
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BOSTON — A founder of a now-defunct Massachusetts pharmaceutical facility responsible for a deadly meningitis outbreak will spend 14 and a half years behind bars, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, lengthening his initial punishment of nine years that was tossed out by an appeals court. Barry Cadden, who was president and co-owner of the now-closed New England Compounding Center, showed little emotion as he was sentenced for a second time after being convicted of fraud and other crimes in the 2012 outbreak that killed 100 people and sickened hundreds of others. The 1st U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals vacated Cadden's sentence last year and ordered the judge to re-examine whether certain enhancements in sentencing guidelines that call for stiffer punishments should apply. The outbreak was traced to mold-tainted steroid injections produced by the company in Framingham, located about 20 miles (32 kilometers) west of Boston. The scandal threw a spotlight on compounding pharmacies, which differ from ordinary drugstores in that they custom mix medications and supply them directly to hospitals and doctors. Prosecutors say the facility cut corners to boost profits, neglected to properly disinfect its rooms, shipped drugs before receiving test results and ignored warning signs that its production methods were unsafe. Prosecutors had urged U. S. District Judge Richard Stearns to resentence Cadden to more than 17 years in prison. “Mr. Cadden ran an operation full of fraud and opportunism that was so risky to patients and he profited well off of it,” said Assistant U. S. Attorney Amanda Strachan, chief of the health care fraud unit in Massachusetts' federal prosecutors office. “He knew the dangers he was creating for patients in this country every time he got behind the wheel at NECC." Strachan read aloud a letter written from the mother of a woman who continues to suffer serious health problems and is confined to bed 75% of the time as a result of receiving the mold-tainted injection. Laura Brinton's mother implored the judge to impose a longer punishment, detailing the agony that her daughter and others have endured. “My beautiful, educated, gracious, successful daughter has asked me many times why we didn't let her die,” Brinton's mother wrote in the letter. "I have told her we all hoped that living would bring with it restored health. How wrong we were." After lengthy trials in Boston's federal court, Cadden and pharmacist Glenn Chin, who oversaw the facility's so-called clean rooms, were both acquitted of second-degree murder under the federal racketeering law but were found guilty of fraud, racketeering and other crimes. They were both subsequently charged with second-degree murder in Michigan state court, where the cases are still pending. Cadden's lawyers had tried to push the blame onto Chin and argue Cadden had every reason to believe the drugs were sterile. Chin pointed the finger back at Cadden, arguing that the co-owner was the one calling the shots. Cadden tearfully apologized to the victims during his first sentencing hearing in 2017, saying “I am sorry for the whole range of suffering that resulted from my company’s drugs.” Cadden's attorney acknowledged that the victims “have endured great suffering and great harm," but noted that Cadden was acquitted of the most serious charges against him. Defense attorney Bruce Singal said Cadden's original nine-year sentence was more than fair for a fraud conviction. “From a legal standpoint, I do not believe that it is appropriate that this court's sentence reflect the deaths and serious injuries that resulted because they have no relationship to the offenses of conviction,” he said. The appeals court also ordered a new sentence for Chin, who got eight years behind bars in 2018. Chin is expected to be resentenced on Thursday.
Pharmacy exec resentenced to 14 years in meningitis outbreak, faces charges in Michigan
eu.detroitnews.com

 

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0.0
Lawyer: Jordan court to rule Monday in royal sedition case
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Jordan’s state security court is to issue its verdict in a high-profile sedition case against a former senior official and a member of the royal family on Monday, just three weeks after the trial began. The quick pace of the trial, its closed sessions and the court’s refusal to accept testimony from key witnesses have given the defense little reason for optimism. Defense lawyers have already pledged to appeal any conviction. Labib Kamhawi, an independent analyst and government critic, called the trial a “cosmetic show” that lacked sufficient debate or evidence. “I don’t see any point in trying to emphasize the logic of justice in a case that lacks actually the acceptable boundaries of a fair trial in international standards," he said. Sharif Hassan bin Zaid and Bassem Awadallah are accused of conspiring with a senior member of the royal family, Prince Hamzah, to foment unrest against King Abdullah II while soliciting foreign help. Hamzah, a former crown prince and half-brother of the king, is not facing charges. The king has said the royal family is handling the matter privately, with Hamzah placed under house arrest in early April. He has been seen in public just once since then. But he is the central figure in the case, with the indictment alleging Hamzah conspired with the two defendants “to achieve his personal ambition” of becoming king. The unprecedented public palace drama has broken taboos in Jordan and sent jitters through foreign capitals, with Western powers rallying behind Abdullah, an indispensable ally in an unstable region. It also exposed rivalries in Jordan’s traditionally discrete Hashemite dynasty and sparked rare public criticism of the king. Hamzah enjoys wide public popularity, and the defendants are the most senior establishment figures to appear before the security court. Bin Zaid is a distant cousin of the king, while Awadallah is a former top royal adviser. The trial has been closed to the media and lasted just six sessions. The court rejected defense lawyers' request to bring Prince Hamzah and top royal and political figures to testify. Defense lawyer Alaa al-Khasawneh said he submitted a 23-page written plea of innocence to the court. Al-Khasawneh said he asked that the court find the defendants not guilty of charges of sedition and of opposing the regime. He declined to say whether he thought the trial is fair or not, saying he would wait for the verdict, scheduled for Monday. But he said he would appeal any conviction. Hamzah’s popularity stems from ties he has nurtured with Jordan’s tribes, the bedrock of Hashemite rule. Atef Majali, a tribal leader in the town of Karak, has said he and other sheikhs have met with the prince more than a dozen times over the years, but denied the king was criticized at these events. The indictment alleged that Hamzah and the two defendants were working on social media messages the prince was to post, with the aim of “inciting some groups in society against the ruling system and state agencies.” Hamzah has denied sedition claims, saying he is being punished for calling out high-level corruption and mismanagement. On April 3, the day he was placed under house arrest, more than a dozen tribal and public figures were arrested, including his chief aide. Only Awadallah and bin Zaid remain in detention.
Lawyer: Jordan court to rule Monday in royal sedition case
wtop.com

 

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0.5
How Big Business Uses Big Government To Kill Competition
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Politicians say they pass laws to "protect Americans from big business." People like hearing that. Many don't like big business. Unfortunately, most people don't realize that those laws often help big business while hurting consumers. "Big business and big government are not enemies like a lot of people think they are," says American Enterprise Institute fellow Tim Carney in my new video . "When government gets bigger, whether it's through spending or taxes or regulation, the big guys, big business benefits." Consider the $15 minimum wage. People think of that law as pro-worker. But big companies like Walmart, Costco, and Amazon lobby in favor of it. Why? Because big business can afford robots. Their competitors often cannot. "Capitalism is a cutthroat thing," says Carney. "But this isn't capitalism. When you turn to government to regulate your competitors out of business, that's where we need to say this is wrong." "Maybe you're too cynical," I suggest. "Maybe [Amazon founder Jeff] Bezos really just does want people to be paid more." "If Jeff Bezos wants people to be paid more," Carney responds, "he can pay people more! But what Bezos is trying to do is outlaw competing business practices." He's not alone. When the big toymaker Mattel was caught selling toys that contained lead, its lobbyists got Congress to force all toymakers to do expensive lead testing. That sounds like they just want to protect children, I tell Carney. "If you're trying to test 1,000 Barbie dolls," he replies, "that might be fairly efficient. But if you are a grandpa making little wooden handmade toys, you'd have to hire some third-party tester. That could cost you $1,000, and you're not going to sell your wooden toy for $1,000. It effectively outlawed handmade toys." After small toymakers screamed about that, Congress exempted toymakers that make fewer than 7,500 toys per year. So small toymakers must stay small. "Maybe what [Mattel] did," says Carney, "is say, 'This is our opportunity through regulation to kill some of our competitors!'" Facebook tries to do that, too. At an international conference, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said, "We don't want private companies making so many decisions about how to balance social equities without a more democratic process." In other words: "Government, please regulate all of us." That sounds noble. Carney points out the catch. "He's calling for a mandate that platforms impose some sort of artificial intelligence to weed out misinformation or hate speech. Facebook can afford that, but Zuckerberg's smaller competitors [like Odysee, Rumble, Parler]…would struggle to pay the thousands of content moderators and the expensive artificial intelligence that Congress may require. New social media sites may never even start." That last sentence is a key point that we often miss. "Regulation doesn't just kill existing businesses," says Carney. "It keeps new businesses from ever entering." Big business has always pushed for regulation. More than 100 years ago, Henry Heinz, founder of Heinz Ketchup, started using refrigerated rail cars because, says Carney, "he could get fresher tomatoes, and therefore he could make a ketchup that didn't rely on sodium benzoate as an artificial preservative." "Everybody loved Heinz ketchup, and it rose up to be about half of the market," Carney continues. "But sometimes people who are half of the market want to be all the market. So Heinz himself started lobbying to outlaw sodium benzoate." Sodium benzoate is a preservative that Heinz's competitors used. Heinz claimed it wasn't safe, but it is safe. It's still used in Sprite, Jell-O Kool-Aid Gels, and other foods. Henry Heinz almost got those products banned, says Carney. "He almost got Teddy Roosevelt on board, which would have outlawed all of his competition. Sometimes businessmen hate nothing more than competition." Not "sometimes." Usually. Almost all businesses hate competition. But competition is what helps us consumers most. When big government colludes with big business to kill competition, we all pay the price. COPYRIGHT 2021 BY JFS PRODUCTIONS INC.
Big business loves big government
ocregister.com

 

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0.4
11 people arrested and charged for interrupting school board meeting to protest Utah mask policy
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In May, a school board meeting in Utah erupted into chaos as dozens of people angrily protested the state's school mask policy. About two months later, members of that angry mob could face up to six months in prison and fines of up to $1,000, CBS affiliate KUTV reports. Eleven people were charged with disorderly conduct and disrupting a public meeting this week, a spokesperson for Granite School District confirmed to CBS News. The charges were filed by the South Salt Lake City Attorney. When Utah met the criteria for statewide COVID-19 mandates to be lifted, Utah Department of Health decided to continue to require masks for K-12 students for the final weeks of the school year, KUTV reports. That prompted dozens of protesters to show up to a May 4 Granite School Board meeting — even though masks were not on the agenda. Video from the meeting shows a parent speak up in support of the mask mandate: "Do not change your game plan in the ninth inning and acquiesce," she said. Other people began shouting, some chanting "No more masks." When former board member and current state senator Kathleen Riebe got up to the podium to talk about teacher appreciation, she was booed by the group. As the shouting continued, one board member yelled out a motion to adjourn the meeting, which was quickly seconded. Although the meeting ended, the protests continued and police were called to deescalate the situation. Following the out-of-control meeting, the Granite School Board released a statement saying it "believes and encourages a diversity of opinions when shared in respectful and civil manner and will continue to encourage civil discourse as a model for the children which we have stewardship over," according to KUTV. Now, at least 11 people who were there face Class B misdemeanor charges, KUTV reports. In a statement to CBS News, a spokesperson for Granite School District said "because many of the individuals were not associated with the district as patrons or residents, there was an extended amount of time needed to identify the perpetrators as part of this investigation." The spokesperson said a 12th suspect wanted in the case has not yet been identified and police are seeking information about their identity. "While there was a police presence at the meeting, the decision was made in advance to be non-confrontational unless the situation became violent," the statement continued. "Regardless, there are repercussions for these actions and the board was unable to conduct its business as a result of these disruptive criminal actions." "The board and district encourage civil discourse as we model appropriate behavior for our children and students," the spokesperson said.
11 anti-mask protesters charged after shutting down Utah school board meeting
thehill.com

 

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0.4
Taliban Attack a Provincial Capital in Afghanistan’s North, Freeing Prisoners
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The Taliban pushed their way into a provincial capital in Afghanistan’s northwest on Wednesday, freeing prisoners there and threatening to overrun the city itself. Details were murky from the city, Qala-i-Naw, the capital of Badghis Province, where fighting was widespread. Videos posted on social media showed some residents welcoming Taliban fighters on motorbikes as they entered. “The entire city is under control of the Taliban,” said Abdul Rahim Rahin, a member of Parliament from Badghis, though his statement could not be immediately confirmed. Reports from the city in the afternoon said that airstrikes by the Afghan Air Force had helped push back the Taliban fighters. Despite dire reports from the ground, a statement from the Ministry of Defense on Wednesday afternoon said the Taliban were “fleeing” and that “in the next few hours, all parts of the city will be cleared.” The assault on Qala-i-Naw is the latest in the Taliban’s recent offensive, which began in earnest as U. S. and international forces began withdrawing from the country in May. In the span of just over two months, the Taliban have managed to seize at least 150 of Afghanistan’s roughly 400 districts. Other provincial capitals in the country’s north — long known as an anti-Taliban stronghold — are also under siege, with insurgent fighters on the periphery of at least three other important cities. The Taliban’s recent victories have put the Afghan government in an increasingly difficult position. Hundreds of Afghan troops have surrendered in past months, forfeiting significant amounts of weapons and equipment to the already well-supplied insurgent group. Last week more than a thousand Afghan troops fled into neighboring Tajikistan to escape the Taliban advance. What American forces remain in Afghanistan have provided some assistance, with fleeting air support that now originates from outside the country. Caught in the middle of this brutal new chapter of the war are civilians, dozens of whom have been wounded and killed along with tens of thousands who have been displaced. Mohammad Yosouf Farahmand, a doctor in the provincial hospital, said that at least one civilian had been killed during the recent fighting and more than a dozen had been wounded. On Tuesday, the Taliban broke into the Badghis provincial jail and freed those inside, said Mirwais, a police officer in Qala-i-Naw who like many Afghans goes by one name. Dozens of inmates have escaped. Taliban attacks on provincial capitals are prohibited under the deal on troop withdrawal that the United States signed with the insurgent group last year. The Taliban seem to have adhered to that during their current offensive, as they have sought to avoid civilian casualties and bad publicity. But in some cases, local Taliban commanders have taken advantage of their gains and attacked some cities. The battle unfolding in Qala-i-Naw, a city of about 50,000 people, has increasingly looked like a direct assault, with the remaining government forces pinned down. It is unclear, however, if the Taliban will try and hold the city outright. “The city will fall to the Taliban if air support does not arrive,” Abdul-Rahim Khan, a police commander in a nearby district, said in an interview as the fighting progressed. On Tuesday, Taliban fighters ambushed a large convoy of Afghan security forces on their way to Qala-i-Naw, killing dozens. Though the exact number of casualties is unclear, Mr. Khan said more than 60 troops were killed and that more than a dozen others had been taken prisoner. Afghan air and commando forces, the backbone of the government’s defense, are already stretched thin by fighting elsewhere in the country, a key part of the Taliban’s strategy to exhaust them. It is not just the Taliban’s military prowess that has precipitated the collapse of the government forces. Low morale and local feuds between militia leaders and government officials have also contributed. The Afghan government has retaken some territory, though its gains pale in comparison to the Taliban’s. Its emerging military strategy seems to consist of consolidating what forces remain around key cities and population centers. Hamdullah Mohib, Afghanistan’s national security adviser, told reporters on Tuesday that the government “has a plan” to retake the districts, and that some outposts were “relocated” because of a lack of supplies. Some regional groups, skeptical that the Afghan security forces can hold out much longer, have begun to muster their own militias to defend their home turf, in a painful echo of the country’s devastating civil war in the 1990s. Increasingly absent in the fight are U. S. and international forces. On Tuesday, the U. S. military said that the withdrawal process was more than 90 percent complete, as part of President Biden’s directive to end the American military mission in Afghanistan by Sept.11. Last week, U. S. forces left Bagram Air Base, once the largest U. S. base in the country, in the middle of the night. The abrupt departure, with little coordination, led to looting on the base until Afghan security forces arrived. A Pentagon spokesman attributed the miscommunication to operational security concerns.
Taliban Reportedly Frees ‘Dozens’ Of Prisoners In Attack Against Badghis’ Capital
dailycaller.com

 

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France: 11 convicted of cyberbullying teen who slammed Islam
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PARIS (AP) — A French court on Wednesday convicted 11 of 13 people charged with harassing and threatening a teenager who harshly criticized Islam in online posts and ended up changing schools and receiving police protection to preserve her safety. The verdict came in a trial in Paris that was the first of its kind since France created a new court in January to prosecute online crimes, including harassment and discrimination. The court sentenced the defendants to suspended prison terms of four to six months and fined them about $1,770 each. “Social networks are the street. When you pass someone in the street, you don’t insult them, threaten them, make fun of them,” the presiding judge, Michel Humbert, said. “What you don’t do in the street, don’t do on social media.” The teen at the center of the landmark cyberbullying case, who has been identified publicly only by her first name, Mila, testified last month that she felt as if she had been “condemned to death.” Mila, who describes herself as atheist, was 16 when she started posting videos on Instagram and later TikTok harshly criticizing Islam and the Quran. Now 18, she testified that “I don’t like any religion, not just Islam.” Her lawyer, Richard Malka, said Mila has received some 100,000 threatening messages, including death threats, rape threats, misogynist messages and hateful messages about her sexual orientation. Mila left one high school, then another. She is now monitored daily by the police for her safety. The 13 defendants from around France came from various backgrounds and religions and were but a handful of all the people who went after Mila with online comments. The others could not be tracked down. One of the 13 was acquitted because his post – “Blow it up” – was directed at Mila’s Twitter account, not at the young woman. The court dropped the case against another defendant for faulty procedures. ___ Vaux-Montagny reported from Lyon. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
Court in France Convicts 11 for Harassing Teenager Over Anti-Islam Rant
nytimes.com

 

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Record Number of Pro-Life Bills Passed in 2021 - Washington Free Beacon
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States have enacted a record number of pro-life bills in 2021 as the Supreme Court prepares to issue its verdict on the constitutionality of abortion restrictions. Ninety abortion restrictions have been enacted in 2021, already surpassing the previous year-long record of 89 in 2011, according to the pro-abortion Guttmacher Institute. The flurry of legislation has emerged at a time when the Supreme Court is reevaluating a three-decade precedent that prohibited many abortion regulations. Idaho Republican state representative Steven Harris championed the state's heartbeat bill, which prohibits most abortions past the first weeks of pregnancy. He said he was encouraged when the justices agreed in May to take up Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban. If the Mississippi ban is upheld, it could set a new standard for abortion laws around the country. "The Supreme Court precedent is what’s driving everything. I don’t see the Court overturning Roe v. Wade completely, but I see them possibly chipping away at it," Harris said. "We believe life begins at conception, but we believe the state has a compelling interest once there’s a heartbeat." Arkansas and Oklahoma banned abortions in all cases except when the mother’s life is in danger. Four states passed "heartbeat bills"—which ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy: Idaho, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas. Montana banned abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Other pro-life actions around the country included banning abortions of those born-alive, banning abortions of those diagnosed with Down syndrome or birth defects, and placing more regulatory safeguards on abortion providers. The initiatives have grown bolder as lawmakers look to a Court widely seen as more receptive to the pro-life position after former president Donald Trump appointed three justices during his term. Pro-life activists say it is more than just judicial optimism that drives the movement. Voters at the state level have elected growing majorities of pro-life lawmakers and Republicans even as the GOP has lost power in Congress. Mallory Quigley, spokeswoman at the pro-life Susan B. Anthony List, said the momentum of the pro-life movement could soon reach the federal level. "As Americans increasingly become aware of the shocking reality that our abortion laws are in line with those of China and North Korea, they are rejecting that status quo," Quigley told the Washington Free Beacon . "The groundswell at the grassroots and state level builds momentum for pro-life law and policy in Washington and give us hope that someday soon the Supreme Court will let stand laws that reflect the values of the people." Jeanne Mancini, president of the March for Life, said the increasing number of pro-life bills reflects the views of the public, which often contradict extreme pro-choice policies. A June poll from the Associated Press found that more than 60 percent of Americans oppose legalized abortion after the first trimester. "As the Biden-Harris administration continues to force its extreme abortion agenda on the public, Americans have turned increasingly to the local level to have their voices heard," Mancini told the Free Beacon . "The fact that states are enacting a record number of pro-life laws in 2021 is an indicator of where most Americans stand on the issue of abortion today." Robin Lundstrum, a Republican state representative in Arkansas, said that even with her state passing the strictest ban on abortion in the country, the work of pro-life legislators does not stop. "There’s always something—a new twist coming out," Lundstrum said. "Planned Parenthood will never rest. And neither should we. We will never grow weary of protecting life."
Ford Foundation Rallies Behind 1619 Project Creator - Washington Free Beacon
freebeacon.com
President of Haiti Assassinated Wednesday - Washington Free Beacon
freebeacon.com

 

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TRENDING ON TOWNHALL MEDIA
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I hope his lawyers told him before he went ahead with this that if it proceeds to trial, the companies’ lawyers will want to depose him about what led to him being banned from their sites. Which means putting him under oath and making him testify about the events leading up to the insurrection on January 6. The House’s January 6 committee would be interested in that. Biden’s DOJ might be too. It won’t proceed to trial, though. This is a stunt aimed at restoring Trump to a position of leadership in the populist fight against Big Tech (which Ron DeSantis was muscling in on). It’s all but impossible to imagine a court, even the Supremes, remaking a gigantic portion of modern American media in a single sweeping decision by declaring America’s most influential social-media companies to be state actors. That’s the sort of policy upheaval that requires deliberation by the public’s representatives in Congress. But there’s always suspense as to what Trump himself does and doesn’t actually believe about the viability of his legal challenges. By all accounts, he seemed convinced last fall that Texas’s go-nowhere election appeal to the Supreme Court and Sidney Powell’s “Kraken” lawsuits would undo Biden’s victory. It’s within the realm of possibility that his lawyers in this action persuaded him that he’s going to win. And since Trump views politics as a matter of loyalty and transaction, he may think that his appointees on the Supreme Court will come through for him this time, if only to atone for letting him down on the Texas case. Here’s the Facebook complaint. Normally you can’t sue a private company on First Amendment grounds since the First Amendment applies to the government. Trump’s way around that is to claim that Facebook is a de facto agent of the state, coerced by the government in certain ways and collaborating with it in others. One example he cites of coercion are quotes from Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats threatening to modify Section 230 unless Big Tech platforms moderate inflammatory content, including posts by Trump, more aggressively. But that argument could be tricky since Trump and other elected Republicans have also called for rescinding Section 230 unless Big Tech does *less* moderating, another form of “coercion.” As for collaborating with the feds, here’s an example that’s not going to win any sympathy for this lawsuit outside of the people who would have cheered Trump on regardless: “Facebook is removing too much anti-vax disinformation” is a talking point that’ll work well in heavily MAGA parts of the country and nowhere else, further evidence that the suit is more of a political stunt than a real lawsuit. As is this: It’s a win/win for Trump. Either the suit somehow prevails or, when it’s inevitably thrown out, he can claim that Democrat and RINO judges have conspired against him and the people once again. At least he’s “fighting.” So donate some money, won’t you? In addition to claiming that Facebook is a state actor under the First Amendment, he argues that Section 230 is unconstitutional because it amounts to Congress deputizing social-media companies to censor content that the government couldn’t constitutionally censor itself. If Facebook is a state actor, though, then Section 230 wouldn’t matter; the company would be bound by First Amendment rules in censoring content. If Facebook isn’t a state actor then striking down Section 230 would be very bad news for Trump. In order to limit their liability from any defamation claims his posts or tweets might inspire, they’d ban him straightaway: Today’s complaint reminded me that it wasn’t long ago that the Supremes opined on when and whether a private entity in the communications industry might operate as a state actor for purposes of the First Amendment. None other than Brett Kavanaugh, in his first year on the Court, wrote the majority opinion in Manhattan Community Access Corp. v. Halleck, a 2019 case about a private company operating public-access television for New York City. Was the company a state actor under those circumstances? It was not, said Kavanaugh, speaking for the Court’s conservative majority: You can see from that logic why Trump’s lawyers are straining to argue coercion and collaboration with the state to boost their argument. The Court looks skeptically at attempts to convert private entities into state actors. And it’s hard to imagine them making a sharp break from the logic above with respect to an industry worth many hundreds of billions of dollars. If social media is to be overhauled, Congress is the proper venue. Here’s Trump discussing the lawsuit this morning.
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PH Supreme Court restores pension, lifts gov't employment ban on dismissed Sandiganbayan judge
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The Philippine Supreme Court ruled in favor of a sacked Sandiganbayan justice who was linked to pork barrel scam mastermind Janet Lim Napoles. - The World Tonight, ANC, July 7, 2021
SC restores pension, lifts gov't employment ban on dismissed Sandiganbayan justice
news.abs-cbn.com

 

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0.1
Democrats' plans to make election cheating easier

Congressional Democrats and their media allies are using Thursday's Supreme Court ruling upholding Arizona's anti-fraud voting laws as a pretext to ram through a federal takeover of elections. The Democrats' legislation, the For the People Act, makes widespread election stealing possible to lock in a permanent Democratic majority. Chuck Schumer is bashing the justices' ruling as "one of the darkest days in all of the Supreme Court's history." The New York Times editorial board calls Arizona's laws "an attack on democracy." Disregard this phony hand-wringing. The justices, by a 6-3 majority, found no evidence that Arizona's voting laws put minority voters at a disadvantage or made voting too hard. Truth is, explained Justice Samuel Alito, "Arizona law generally makes it very easy to vote." Alito explained that states have the authority to pass "nondiscriminatory voting rules" to deter fraud. That's what Arizona did. Arizona requires that voters cast ballots in their assigned precinct, and it outlaws the sleazy practice of ballot harvesting, where paid workers walk through neighborhoods, knock on doors and offer to help residents return the ballots they've received in the mail. Ballot harvesting invites cheating, since harvesters invariably are trying to get a particular candidate elected. As for charges the Court is failing to protect democracy, Alito explained that "there's nothing democratic" about robbing state legislatures of their authority over elections and handing it to unelected federal courts. Or to Congress, as Biden, Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi want to do. These pols are distorting Thursday's ruling into an urgent call to enact the For the People Act, also dubbed H. R.1., as if it's a civil rights imperative. The New York Times claims "Republican-controlled legislatures across the country have raced one another to pass laws that make voting harder." Untrue. They're making cheating harder. Alito explained that voting is much easier than it was in 1982, when the pertinent section of the Voting Rights Act was adopted. Back then, "states typically required nearly all voters to cast their ballots in person on election day and allowed only narrow and tightly defined categories of voters to cast absentee ballots." States gradually adopted early voting and voting by mail. But the pandemic produced the biggest changes, resulting in election night chaos and skepticism. Now states are reforming their laws, which the Constitution empowers them to do. Democrats treat voter fraud claims as Republican hallucinations. Not true. An alleged ballot-harvesting scheme in Minneapolis was exposed last fall by the undercover news organization Project Veritas, showing harvesters exploiting the elderly and immigrants. Europeans get it. To deter fraud, three quarters of European countries either bar absentee voting or require showing a photo ID to get a ballot. But H. R.1 forces states to mail absentee ballots to all voters and allow harvesting. H. R.1 also compels states to automatically register everyone to vote when they sign up for food assistance, unemployment benefits or other government support. That includes noncitizens, unless they declare themselves ineligible. It bans photo ID requirements. Anyone can show up on Election Day to vote and simply sign a statement claiming to be registered. Senate Democrats don't have 60 votes to overcome a filibuster and bring H. R.1 to a vote. They'd like to pass it by August in order to change voting laws nationwide before the midterm elections next year. The goal is to do what the Supreme Court refused to do: Eliminate election provisions that target fraud. Since Thursday's decision, Democrats and the media have ramped up demands to end the filibuster and pass the bill with a simple majority. The New York Times declared that "the ball is in Congress' court and time is fast running out." The Times claims H. R.1 would "restore the heart of the Voting Rights Act." Nonsense. Discrimination against minority voters is already illegal, as it should be. Let's get real. H. R.1 is a corrupt scheme to make cheating widespread. SUPPORT TRUTHFUL JOURNALISM. MAKE A DONATION TO THE NONPROFIT WND NEWS CENTER. THANK YOU!

 

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0.3
Hawaii Bill Legalizing Stun Guns Just Became Law Today, Will Become Effective Jan.1

Shortly after D. C. v. Heller was decided, stun guns were banned in seven states, D. C., the Virgin Islands, several substantial cities, and some smaller towns. (I cataloged these in Nonlethal Self-Defense, (Almost Entirely) Nonlethal Weapons, and the Rights To Keep and Bear Arms and Defend Life,62 Stanford Law Review 199 (2009).) But I'm pleased to say that things have gotten a good deal better. In Caetano v. Massachusetts (2016), the Court signaled that stun gun bans may well be unconstitutional, and lower courts and legislatures have largely heard the message. By my count, since D. C. v. Heller stun gun bans have been invalidated or repealed in Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Wisconsin, D. C., the Virgin Islands, Overland Park (Kansas), and Annapolis, Baltimore, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Tacoma, and in four Maryland counties (Anne Arundel County, Baltimore County, Harford County, and Howard County). The Illinois Supreme Court, which had held that the Second Amendment secures a right to carry guns (a matter on which courts are split), has also held that the Second Amendment likewise secures a right to carry stun guns. The logic of this opinion would also invalidate, I think, the bans on irritant sprays (such as pepper spray and mace) in some Illinois towns (see pp.246-47 of this article). Stun gun bans remain in effect, to my knowledge, in Stun guns are also heavily regulated (e.g., with total bans on carrying in most places outside the home) in Connecticut and in some cities. For more, see this article, though the listing of restrictions in Appendix II is now out-of-date.

 

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0.2
Portland rent control ordinance survives legal challenge by landlords

A Superior Court justice has upheld Portland’s new rent control ordinance despite a lawsuit brought by local landlords. The ordinance limits most rent increases to the rate of inflation, increases the amount of notice a landlord must provide when not renewing an at-will tenancy and creates a Rent Board to enforce the ordinance and award additional rent increases when appropriate. The Southern Maine Landlords Association sued the city of Portland in Cumberland County Superior Court in January, two months after voters approved the change on the November ballot. The landlords argued the ordinance is vague, conflicts with state and federal statutes, and is an improper use of the citizen initiative process. The city argued the city was not vague and provided adequate safeguards to ensure fair treatment of landlords and tenants. People First Portland, which backed the ordinance during the election, and the newly formed Foreside Tenants Union also intervened to defend the ordinance. And Pine Tree Legal Assistance, which provides free civil legal aid to low-income people, filed its own brief to support rent control, saying the COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated housing instability in Maine’s largest city. In April, the landlords association filed a motion for summary judgment and asked the court to resolve the lawsuit in their favor. Superior Court MaryGay Kennedy denied that motion last week. Among her findings, she wrote that the ordinance limits the board’s discretion to approve or deny rent increased to objective and qualifiable metrics, and it is not on its face biased toward either tenants or landlords. Brit Vitalius, president of the Southern Maine Landlords Association, said he was disappointed by the decision and still confused by the ordinance. The attorneys are still reviewing Kennedy’s order, so he could not say whether the landlords would appeal. “We’re still left with this ordinance that has left the city of Portland landlords and tenants with a lot of questions and problems ahead,” he said. Ben Gaines, who represents People First Portland and the tenants union, said it was “a good day for the tenants of the city and a great day for democracy.” “This rent control ordinance starts the work of stabilizing out of control rents and providing a framework to protect vulnerable tenants struggling with our state’s affordable housing crisis,” Gaines wrote in an email. “It’s time for the landlords to stand down and recognize that this law passed because we have a real problem on our hands.” A city spokeswoman did not respond to an email or a voicemail late Wednesday afternoon asking about the order. Portland’s website includes guidance for landlords and tenants on the new ordinance, and the members of the Rent Board were appointed in March. In April, a Portland landlord filed a separate lawsuit over the ordinance. Bayview Court LLC and Eastern Promenade Limited Liability Co., which own 102 units in Portland, sued the city in an effort to prevent public disclosure of detailed information about rents. The status of that lawsuit was not clear Wednesday evening. Portland voters approved five citizen referendums in November, including rent control, and this is not the only one to face a legal challenge. Earlier this week, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled a hazard wage mandate is constitutional, but the provision that boosts pay during emergencies such as the pandemic does not take effect until next year. Success. Please wait for the page to reload. If the page does not reload within 5 seconds, please refresh the page. Enter your email and password to access comments. Forgot Password? Don't have a Talk profile? Create one. Invalid username/password. Please check your email to confirm and complete your registration. Create a commenting profile by providing an email address, password and display name. You will receive an email to complete the registration. Please note the display name will appear on screen when you participate. Already registered? Log in to join the discussion. Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or login to participate in the conversation. Here’s why. Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code. Send questions/comments to the editors. « Previous

 

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0.7
2-year jail sentence for golfer Cabrera over assault charges

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Argentinian golfer Ángel Cabrera, a former Masters and U. S. Open champion, was sentenced on Wednesday to two years in prison on assault charges against his former partner. A court in the province of Cordoba,500 miles (about 800 kilometers) northwest of Buenos Aires, convicted the 51-year-old for assaulting, threatening and harassing Cecilia Torres Mana, his partner between 2016 and 2018. Cabrera, who denied in the trial any wrongdoing, will serve his sentence immediately. “His situation is much more complex than this, he has other charges for which there are arrest warrants too. There are other victims,” prosecutor Laura Battistelli told TV channel Todo Noticias. The first charges were brought by Torres Mana, and two other women then did the same. The golfer traveled to the United States in July 2020 without seeking permission, which led the province of Cordoba to request his arrest. Cabrera was arrested by Interpol agents in Rio de Janeiro in January. Last month he was extradited from Brazil to his homeland so he could face trial. He won the U. S. Open at Oakmont in 2007, beating Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk by one shot. He also triumphed in a Masters playoff in 2009 and lost a playoff in the same event in 2013 to Adam Scott. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/hub/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

 

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0.4
Westchester trash hauler charged with running up bills at NYC strip clubs

This wasn’t the kind of bust they had in mind. A trash hauler under contract with Westchester County was arrested for running up $135,000 worth of charges at strip clubs – then billing taxpayers for the romps. City Carting of Westchester and manager Christopher Oxer,35, were accused of filing false spending records to cover up the visits to the clubs and their restaurants – including one night that cost $40,000. “The Westchester District Attorney’s Office has zero tolerance for public corruption and misuse of public tax dollars by government employees or contractors,” District Attorney Mimi Rocah said in a statement on Tuesday . “The actions of Christopher Oxer and City Carting of Westchester represent a brazen attempt to rip off county residents by including expenditures for items that clearly are not covered under their contract.” Oxer used a company American Express card in visits to Prime 333 at Sapphire and Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club but then listed the bills as tires, equipment maintenance and tolls, according to the felony complaint obtained by lawandcrime.com. The company, under contract since 2004, gets more than $20 million a year from Westchester government for operating transfer stations, processing recycling and other services, the DA’s office said. The contractor allegedly shared a financial ledger to a company called Kroll Associates, paid to monitor the contract for Westchester to ensure compliance with the law – and that the company stays free from the influence of organized crime, the DA said. City Carting and Oxer, of Darien, Connecticut, were arraigned Tuesday on six counts of offering a false instrument, a felony, the DA said. Oxer declined comment to a CBS 2 reporter. Bruno Gioffre, an attorney for the company, said he couldn’t speak for Oxer but told the TV station the company hadn’t done anything wrong. “From what our investigation has entailed and what we know, City Carting of Westchester – the actual company – did nothing here,” he told CBS.

 

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0.3
Michael Avenatti's Post-Trial Motions Denied

I know nothing about the subject, and despite that have no opinion. But I thought I'd pass along Judge Paul Gardephe's decision, handed down yesterday, in case some of you find it interesting. The opening: Michael Avenatti is charged in the (S1) Indictment with transmitting interstate communications with intent to extort, in violation of 18 U. S. C. § 875(d) (Count One); Hobbs Act extortion, in violation of 18 U. S. C. § 1951 (Count Two); and honest services wire fraud, in violation of 18 U. S. C. §§ 1343 and 1346 (Count Three). The Government charges that Avenatti—who is licensed to practice law in California—transmitted in interstate commerce threats "to cause financial harm to Nike and its reputation if Nike did not agree to make multimillion dollar payments to Avenatti"; "used threats of economic and reputational harm in an attempt to obtain multimillion dollar payments from Nike"; and used interstate communications to "engage[] in a scheme to obtain payments for himself from Nike based on confidential information provided to Avenatti by [client Gary Franklin] for the purpose of furthering Avenatti's representation of [Franklin], without [Franklin]'s knowledge or approval," thereby depriving Franklin of the "duty of honest services" he was owed. Avenatti proceeded to trial on January 27, 2020. After a three-week trial, on February 14, 2020, the jury returned a verdict finding Avenatti guilty on all counts. Avenatti has moved for a judgment of acquittal or a new trial, pursuant to Rules 29 and 33 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. Avenatti argues that (1) the evidence at trial is insufficient to prove that he acted "wrongfully" and with "intent to defraud"; and (2) the statutes under which he was convicted are unconstitutionally vague-as-applied. Avenatti also contends that this Court erred in (1) excluding certain text messages and emails; and (2) responding to a jury note regarding permissible inferences from exhibits admitted to show state of mind. In a June 4, 2021 letter, Avenatti moves to compel the Government to produce Section 3500 material and alleged Brady / Giglio material concerning Judy Regnier, a Government witness at trial. In a July 5, 2021 letter, Avenatti moves for a new trial on the same basis. In his June 4, 2021 letter, Avenatti also raises concerns regarding press access to voir dire. For the reasons stated below, Avenatti's post-trial motions will be denied.

 

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0.4
'To Catch a Predator' host Chris Hansen calls warrant for his arrest a 'non-event'

Clearing up his recent legal trouble in Michigan, NBC's "To Catch a Predator" host, Chris Hansen, said his arrest was a "non-event" that was solved in under 40 minutes. Hansen said he did not "skip a court date," but he was informed about it slightly too late due to miscommunication. "We didn't have notice of this and obviously we comply with any subpoena or any hearing. We have nothing to hide." Hansen was subpoenaed to appear in court to present raw video footage taken during a October 2020 sex-trafficking operation he took part in with Shiawassee County and Genesee County sheriff offices. "In that particular operation, three men surfaced," Hansen said. "One of whom was Michael Lott, a 32-year-old Michigan corrections officer at the time, allegedly met a teen girl online and came to have sex with her at (a hotel in Owosso)." Hansen owns a residence in Michigan but mainly resides in New York, he said. He did not receive mail to his New York residence alerting him of a scheduled hearing, even after giving Lott's law office his New York address. Lott's defense emailed Hansen’s attorney about the hearing in Shiawassee County Circuit Court around 4:30 p.m. last Wednesday, a day prior to the hearing, Hansen said. They were not sent further details or given the opportunity to join the hearing via Zoom. More: Longtime TV station leader Marla Drutz to retire after nearly 4 decades in Detroit media More: Fenton 1st-grade teacher joins Trump's lawsuit against Facebook, Zuckerberg Thursday morning, the day of the hearing, Hansen’s attorney attempted to call the lawyer and the court, but by the time they reached the court, the hearing had already taken place. A bench warrant was issued for Hansen's arrest for failure to appear in court, but the NBC "Dateline" host flew to Michigan and appeared in court Friday morning to resolve the issue. The warrant was withdrawn and Hansen was released about 40 minutes later, after the explaining to the judge. "Part of the confusion I think was, normally in these cases, the prosecutor would subpoena footage like this. If the subpoena was legal and compliant with everything we need, we would honor the subpoena and turn over the material," Hansen said. "Then that material would be available to the defense under discovery, but that prosecutor for whatever reason hadn't gotten around to doing that, the defense did, and so we tried to correct the situation right away." It was agreed, based on a stipulation in the agreement, that Hansen would provide the video evidence within 14 days, he said. Contact Nour Rahal: nrahal@freepress.com and follow her on Twitter @nrahal1. To subscribe, please go to freep.com/specialoffer.

 

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2.6
Vadnais Heights man gets 140 months in prison for Payne-Phalen murder

A Vadnais Heights man was sentenced to 11 years and eight months in prison Wednesday for killing a father of four last year in St. Paul. Daniel Marcel Sheppard,44, fatally shot 31-year-old Ervin Dukes III on Sept.12 in the Payne-Phalen neighborhood. Witnesses said the two men argued and that Dukes taunted Sheppard after he pulled out a handgun. Sheppard reportedly shot Dukes in the chest, then told him to “get down and die.” Initially charged with second-degree murder, Sheppard pleaded guilty in April to first-degree manslaughter. “I don’t think I got justice,” said Dukes’s mother, Latonia Burgin. “But at least (Sheppard) got something.” Burgin moved from Chicago and settled her family in St. Paul when Dukes was a child, hoping to keep him safe from street violence. Dukes had attended Harding High School and had a fiancée and four children. Sheppard was sentenced Wednesday at the Law Enforcement Center in St. Paul for Sheppard’s killing, as well as separate attacks on two other men. On July 2, 2020, officers responded to a “problem property” at 876 Lawson Ave. in Payne-Phalen for a reported shooting. A 32-year-old man who was brought to Regions Hospital with a gunshot wound to his abdomen told police that Sheppard had shot him outside the home. The victim had been upset about being kicked out of the house and had thrown a brick through the window of the front door earlier that week, which angered the house’s owner and the owner’s sister, who was dating Sheppard. When the man returned, Sheppard confronted him. The two men argued and Sheppard took out a gun and fired several times, hitting the man once in the stomach. Sheppard originally was charged with attempted murder but pleaded guilty to second-degree assault as part of the deal with prosecutors in the Dukes murder case. At the same April court hearing, Sheppard pleaded guilty to third-degree assault in the May 24, 2019, beating of a 53-year-old man at a Little Canada apartment. The victim, who called 911, had multiple cuts and bruises to his forehead, left eye and both sides of his face. He told police Sheppard and two others had invited him in for drinks before beating and robbing him. Sheppard has an extensive criminal history, including a juvenile adjudication for first-degree criminal sexual conduct and adult convictions for felony assault and aggravated robbery. He will serve his sentences for the two assaults at the same time as the manslaughter sentence. Related Articles Police ID man,30, who was killed Tuesday in his St. Paul home Teen who recorded George Floyd’s arrest loses uncle in police crash Man killed by police in Olivia MN died of multiple gunshots Police investigating fatal shooting in St. Paul’s Dayton’s Bluff Authorities still looking for Wis. homicide suspect after vehicles found in St. Paul

 

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Police Issue Alert After Armed Robbers Struck This Past Saturday Night In Chinatown, River North

'The Patrick Star Show's Bill Fagerbakke And Cree Summer Preview Nickelodeon's Newest Series: 'A Big, Gelatinous Pile Of Impulses'Bill Fagerbakke and Cree Summer dive into 'The Patrick Star Show' coming to Nickelodeon on July 9th. WATCH: 'Love Island' Season Three Villa Tour And Exclusive Content Coming To Paramount+Take a tour of the 'Love Island' season 3 villa and find out about exclusive content coming to Paramount+. 'Big Brother' And 'Love Island' Return With Hot New Summer Seasons On CBS'Love Island' and 'Big Brother' return with all-new season this summer on CBS. 'I'm Really Impressed With Helio Castroneves': Brad Daugherty Weighs In On SRX Racing Series Season Ahead Of Saturday's Trip To Lucas Oil RacewayThe CBS analyst says he's been struck by the performance of IndyCar drivers, Castroneves in particular, thus far in the Camping World SRX series as the drivers head to Indy for Week 4's race at Lucas Oil Raceway. World's Strongest Man Competition Airing on CBS Starting Saturday July 3See 25 of the world's strongest athletes take on a gauntlet of tests to prove which of them earns the title of World's Strongest Man. Big Brother Season 23: Meet The New HouseguestsMeet the Houseguests for season 23 of 'Big Brother.'

 

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Four injured by gunfire in Fort Pierce; police investigate

FORT PIERCE — Jessie Charoo said she was sitting on her couch earlier this week when she heard gunfire. “I don't come out the door at night. Something I never do over here — too dark,” Charoo,47, said Wednesday. “When I did peep out the back door, all I seen was police and crime scene.” Charoo sat behind the wheel of a vehicle Wednesday morning at a home near North 14th Street and G Terrace. Fort Pierce police went to the 1400 block of G Terrace at 12:39 a.m. Monday after a person sustained a gunshot wound. That person was taken to Lawnwood Regional Medical Center & Heart Institute in Fort Pierce with non-life threatening injuries. More: More than 200 vehicles stopped in roadside safety checkpoint in Port St. Lucie Newsletter: Sign up for the free TCPalm on St. Lucie County newsletter Three additional people arrived at the hospital with non-life-threatening-gunshot wounds, police said. It was unclear where those three people were injured or whether there was a connection with the G Terrace incident. Attempts to reach police Wednesday to ask questions were unsuccessful. On Wednesday on G Terrace, no obvious signs of what may have occurred Monday were visible. A vacant lot is on the north side of G Terrace at North 14th Street with single-story residences on the south. Two small orange cats padded around outside a home, and a dog was secured behind another. John Brown,27, was in his car in the vacant lot. He said he’s a longtime G Terrace resident, and celebrated on the Fourth of July. He heard no gunfire. “I was dead asleep,” Brown said. “I had partied for the Fourth, and it was over for me.” Brown said people were out all around the area on the Fourth of July. More: Treasure Coast overall crime down in 2020, but did COVID-19 factor in? “That's the tradition. Everybody come together, cook, barbecue, play music, have a few drinks,” Brown said. “It wasn't nothing irregular … it was a holiday weekend.” Police reported there was a large crowd gathered at the scene when they arrived. Hearing gunfire is a “normal thing” in the area, Brown said. Charoo said she thought people lack a place to go and get frustrated being inside. “When they come outside, they let alcohol take over,” Charoo said. Still, she said, she thought police were working to keep the area safe. “They’re doing all right with it,” Charoo said. “When I talked to the police the other day, they were saying they were going to come and start doing traffic stops in the area and make it a little better.” Police are seeking help in the incident. Those with information are asked to call Detective Ludmila Quintao,772-467-6862, or Treasure Coast Crime Stoppers,800-273-8477. Will Greenlee is a breaking news reporter for TCPalm. Follow Will on Twitter @OffTheBeatTweet or reach him by phone at 772-692-8936. E-mail him at will.greenlee@tcpalm.com If you're a subscriber, thank you. If not, become a subscriber to get the latest breaking news and weird crime coverage.

 

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Arthur Keith's Family Demands Civil Rights Probe Into His Death At Hands Of Cleveland Cop

The family of Arthur Keith is demanding a civil rights investigation after the Ohio Attorney General's Office announced no charges would be brought against the Cleveland housing officer who fatally shot the 19-year-old. "We were told by the attorney general that they were going to do a complete investigation, and we know for a fact that they did not," Stanley Jackson, an attorney for the family, said at a news conference on Wednesday. Jackson said the family is requesting a federal civil rights investigation into the shooting, as well as into the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority (CMHA) police. "We believe this is not probably the first incident. We believe that hopefully, this will be the last incident," Jackson said, adding he felt the review will likely "uncover some irregularities" in CMHA's policing. Keith was shot and killed by CMHA officer James Griffiths on Nov.13. The shooting happened within view of children attending an after-school program with the Boys & Girls Club, according to Cleveland.com. A grand jury was convened by Attorney General Dave Yost to decide whether the shooting was a criminal act. On Wednesday, Yost's office announced the jury declined to indict Griffiths or any of the officers involved. "The grand jury ultimately felt that Officer Griffiths acted reasonably," senior assistant attorney general Anthony Pierson said at a news conference. On Nov.13, a 911 caller reported that a person who had fired shots on a previous occasion was in the King Kennedy Complex. CMHA officers responded and encountered a van matching the 911 caller's description. Pierson said one officer opened the van's door and saw Keith in the back of the vehicle with a gun. Investigators said Keith pointed a gun at an officer, who then shot Keith four times. Only the CMHA officer said Keith pointed a gun at him, Pierson said. Witnesses have told local news outlets that Keith didn't point a gun and was running away when he was shot. Pierson said Keith's DNA was on the trigger, slide and magazine of the gun found at the scene. Jackson, the family's attorney, disputed the evidence in the case and claimed several eyewitnesses were never interviewed by investigators. He also questioned why surveillance footage of the shooting was never made available. "Once again, this moment is a defining moment— an example of what we have in Ohio when it comes to police reform when it comes to accountability dealing with excessive force," Jackson said. CMHA said in a statement that the grand jury's decision not to charge Griffiths "does not change the tragic events that occurred on Nov.13,2020, when a young man, Arthur Keith, lost his life. We continue to extend our sympathy to Mr. Keith's family, friends, and the community." "Given the conclusion of the investigation and proceedings, this matter will now be reviewed internally by a neutral outside party to ensure the Officer acted in accordance with CMHA's constitutionally certified policies and procedures," the housing authority's statement said.

 

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Woman engaged to convict she’s never met — who gets sprung in 2032

She’s got a cellmate for a soulmate. A Netherlands woman redefined the term “cellmate” after getting engaged to a US prisoner she’s never met — and who won’t be let out until 2032. A Newsflare video detailing their unusual love story has since gone viral. “I never wanted to get married or have children before I met him, but now I do,” said Kelly Jacobs, who has been writing to jailbird James “Wyatt” Dentel since 2019. The 32-year-old convict is currently serving a 20-year sentence at the Snake River Correctional Institution in Oregon for assault and unlawful use of a firearm during a bar brawl in 2012, in which he allegedly shot four men. “He was with a girlfriend, they were at a bar and they got attacked by five strangers,” Jacobs explained of the incident that got him in the slammer. “He tried to protect himself and his girlfriend, he pulled a gun and shot four of them, but none of them died.” The unlikely pair’s romance began two years ago, when Jacobs,28, who used to be an intern at a prison, joined inmate correspondence service Writeaprisoner.com so she could find out more about “what it’s like to be an inmate.” The Heerlen native chose Dentel because he “looked friendly” and the two quickly hit off. “After a while, we started calling and having video calls and using direct messenger, we would message each other for hours every day,” gushed a starry-eyed Jacobs. The infatuated social work graduate said she was initially “scared” and even tried to fight her feelings for Dentel because she didn’t want their relationship to “go that way.” However, Jacobs came around after sensing that she could talk about “pretty much anything” with her prison crush from random subjects to “deep things.” Despite leading “very different lives,” the budding lovebirds shared many mutual interests, including Italian food, Miguel songs and even “Game of Thrones.” “We talked about it a lot, he described all the negative aspects of being in a relationship with a prisoner, but I said I wanted to give it a try,” said Dentel’s enamored pen pal. Dentel popped the big question via video call, and the two plan to tie the knot in his correctional facility in October — over a decade before his release date. The inmate proposed with a ring he MacGyvered in the can but arranged for a jeweler on the outside to craft a bona fide wedding band as well. The ceremony might not be a postcard wedding, however, since Jacobs claims she doesn’t need anything too fancy. “For the wedding, I won’t wear a traditional, fancy dress, because people don’t do that for prison weddings,” said the gutsy gal, who reportedly got Dentel’s first initial inked on her ring finger. Meanwhile, her prison paramour reportedly sports several tattoos of her on his body. Unsurprisingly, Jacobs’ parents were initially skeptical of the arrangement, but they have since grown to like her future hubby, Newsflash reported. “They always thought that inmates were aggressive and rude, like on TV, but they now see that he is soft and warm and he has good manners,” she said. Before posing the question, Dentel requested permission from the father of his betrothed, who not only agreed but is also slated to attend the ceremony. The only person with second thoughts about their relationship was Jacobs’ “protective” older brother, although she thinks he’ll change his tune upon meeting her cellblock soulmate. As one can imagine, marrying a convict presented a host of obstacles. The couple has never been in the same room, and even after tying the knot, they still won’t be able to consummate the marriage due to Oregon’s ban on conjugal visits. Not only that but by the time Dentel is released, he’ll be around 44 while his other half will be approaching 40. “Of course it is difficult,” said Jacobs, who says her felon fiancé is “worried that I won’t pick up the phone eventually, or that I won’t wait for him.” Fortunately, “he says he’s quite confident that I will wait because I’m not the kind of person who goes to parties or leads a crazy life,” the relieved gal said. By a similar token, Jacobs is concerned that he’ll write to other women — which she equates to cheating — and that the prospective spouses won’t have physical chemistry when they meet in the flesh. Fortunately, the dreamer has since quashed that fear and even plans to move closer to his prison when the pandemic lifts so that she can visit him as much as possible. When Dentel finally does get released from the clink, the bar-crossed lovers plan to start a family as soon as they can. “He’s a little worried about being an older father, but my dad was around his age when he had my brother, so it’s all possible,” explained Dentel’s bride-to-be. Of course, not everyone was so hunky-dory with the couple’s Harley Quinn -evoking love story. Jacobs says she’s received backlash over getting engaged to a prisoner, which is often associated with twisted fans trying to gain clout by wedding a jailhouse rockstar. The most notorious of these penal groupies was magazine editor Doreen Lioy, who infamously married Los Angeles serial killer Richard Ramirez — a k a the “Night Stalker” — while he was on death row. “I have received negativity online about it, people say things like, ‘How could you be with a criminal?'” Jacobs lamented. “‘He’ll get out and then murder you.'” Indeed, she says she’ll never condone Dentel’s crime. “Even though it was an act of self-defense, it is never OK to do what he did,” said Jacobs, who plans to pursue psychiatry in the near future. Nonetheless, Dentel’s forgiving gal pal does not “judge him as a person for his past.” Jacobs sums it up like this: “Being a man in prison doesn’t always make someone a bad person. Just like being a free man doesn’t always make him a good one.”

 

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Fact-checking claims bail reform is driving increase in violent crime

Experts, politicians and pundits have provided different theories as to why, after decades of a downward trend in overall crime, certain violent crimes are on the rise in cities across the country. While many point to the pandemic and the economic collapse that followed, some have focused on more specific aspects of the criminal justice system, and in particular some recent efforts to reform it. Bail reforms -- which generally focus on removing or limiting the use of cash bail against defendants who are accused of misdemeanors or nonviolent offenses -- aim at making sure most defendants are not held in jail while awaiting trial solely because they cannot afford cash bail. During a congressional hearing in late June, Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, suggested reforms eliminating cash bail could partially be to blame for the recent spike in crime. Graham asked FBI Director Christopher Wray if he believed "one of the reasons crime is on the rise is that certain jurisdictions have basically eliminated bail?" "You catch them on Monday morning and they're out on the streets Monday afternoon," Graham said. While Wray did not directly answer Graham's question, he suggested that "one of the causes of the violent crime spike are certain kinds of prosecution practices," adding that "there's nothing more disheartening to a law enforcement officer to see somebody that you worked hard to arrest promptly back out committing a crime again." Facts First: There's no clear evidence linking bail reforms -- which have been in place for years in some cities -- to the recent rise in violent crimes. In fact, the majority of cities that have seen increases in crime have not eliminated cash bail. Many variables have contributed to the increases Graham is referencing but CNN has seen no evidence to suggest that bail reform is a major factor. Several states and jurisdictions have passed bail reform to varying degrees for misdemeanor offenses. Washington, DC, removed cash bail in most cases in 1992. New Mexico largely eliminated it in 2016. In 2017, Cook County, Illinois, passed significant bail reform. The state of Illinois eliminated the practice in February but the change won't go into effect until 2023. New Jersey largely removed cash bail in 2017 and Alaska largely ended its cash bail system in 2018. New York state passed legislation in 2019 on bail reform, making "release before trial automatic for most people accused of misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies," according to the Vera Institute of Justice. Three months after the law went into effect it was amended to allow judges more situations to institute cash bail. In March, the California Supreme Court ruled that defendants could not be jailed before their trials simply because they cannot afford their set bail. However, the increase in crime has occurred in cities across the country, not just those with bail reform measures. According to a report from the Major Cities Chiefs Association, out of the 66 largest police jurisdictions,63 saw an increase in at least one category of violent crimes in 2020, CNN reported. The vast majority of these cities have not passed reforms eliminating bail. Experts have noted that the increases in crime during the pandemic are not due to a single factor but rather to a "perfect storm " of events and changes including the subsequent economic collapse, changes in policing and more. Studies on bail reform There have been very few studies analyzing the effects of bail reform on crime rates during the pandemic era and studies done prior to the pandemic have come to different conclusions as to the effects these reforms have had. In a November 2020 report, the left-leaning Prison Policy Initiative, a criminal justice reform think tank, reviewed 13 jurisdictions that have instituted pretrial reforms -- including Washington, DC, New Jersey and Kentucky -- and found that "All but one of these jurisdictions saw decreases or negligible increases in crime after implementing reforms." "The one exception is New York State," the report says, "where the reform law existed for just a few months before it was largely rolled back." In July of last year, the New York Post investigated NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea's claim that bail reform played a role in the rise in shootings. The Post reported that, according to data from the NYPD, bail reform did not play a role in the increase in shootings. Out of the 528 shootings from January 2020 through June 2020, only one person charged with a shooting had been released under the state's bail reform, according to the Post. One study conducted prior to the pandemic contradicts the implication that bail reforms lead to a significant increase in violent crime. An October 2019 report from the University of New Mexico indicated that after the state's bail reforms were implemented, a majority of individuals released pretrial did not commit other crimes. According to the report, "While approximately one-quarter of the defendants released were arrested for a new offense during the pretrial period, very few defendants released pretrial were arrested for a new violent crime." Studies on certain jurisdictions, such as Cook County, disagree on whether cash bail can be linked to any increase in crime. Two studies from the University of Utah and Loyola University Chicago came to opposite conclusions on whether the bail reform in Cook County led to an increase in crime in the county. These studies of Cook County are a clear example of how researchers disagree on methodology in studying the effects of bail reform and increases in crime. Despite these disagreements, CNN has seen no clear evidence to support Graham's insinuation that the small number of bail reforms in the US have played a role in the increase in violent crimes throughout major cities in the country.

 

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Remaining ‌’Rise‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Moors’ ‌members‌ charged in highways standoff arraigned

Two more members of the Rise of the Moors militia group faced arraignment Wednesday in Malden District court where proceedings continued on a contentious track. “You’re trying to force me into a jurisdiction that doesn’t apply to me, and that’s unlawful,” said Conrad Pierre,29, when he appeared before Judge Emily Karstetter. Pierre’s arraignment began Tuesday afternoon, but was continued to Wednesday. He called his name “fictitious” and objected to it, instead giving his last name as Bey, as many others charged in Saturday’s standoff with police have before the court. When he continued to interrupt Judge Karstetter, he was removed from the courtroom, shouting “I object!” Identifying himself as a “foreign national,” when he returned, Pierre said he did not need a lawyer. “I appreciate the courtesy, but I don’t need representation from a foreign nation,” he added. When the judge tried to place him under oath to answer questions about his ability to represent himself, he refused. He was finally represented by a court-appointed lawyer the third time he was brought before the judge. Pierre was held pending a dangerousness hearing Friday. Also appearing before the court Wednesday was John Doe #2, who continued to refuse to identify himself. Like John Doe #1 in the case, Judge Karstetter told him he had until Friday to identify himself, and delayed his arraignment until then. The men, along with seven others arraigned Tuesday, face several charges including unlawful possession of a firearm and ammunition and the use of body armor in commission of a crime, in connection with the standoff that started early Saturday morning on I-95 in Wakefield. State Police say they recovered three AR-15 rifles, two pistols, a bolt-action rifle, a shotgun and a short-barrel rifle. Throughout the course of the arraignments Tuesday and Wednesday, the members of the Rise of the Moors, who State Police said subscribe to “Moorish Sovereign Ideology,” denied that the court had jurisdiction over them. However, members of The Moorish Science Temple of America-1928, a national organization, distanced themselves from the Rise of the Moors and said the Rhode Island-based group had co-opted many of their ideas. Yssis Saadi El, Senior Minister and Outreach Director for the group, said Rise of the Moors “took bits and pieces of our religious doctrine and kind of misappropriated this idea and fundamental theology of what we’re about and kind of created their own version of their group.” She called their beliefs “diametrically opposed” to hers. “It is written in our core bylaws that we’re not gonna go against any government,” she added. “We are to be law-abiding citizens.”.

 

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1.0
Man arrested on hate crime charges during Israel-Palestine protests

A Staten Island man was arrested on hate crime charges Wednesday for allegedly throwing a firework at a woman from a pickup truck in Manhattan’s Diamond District during pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian protests, police said. The NYPD said on Twitter that Mohammed Othman,24, was arrested for hurling a firework that struck a 55-year-old woman from the back of a pickup truck on May 20, cops said. The woman was treated at Bellevue Hospital for burns to her lower back and released, cops said. Police said Othman was also charged with two other incidents from the same protest. He was hit with first-degree gang assault as a hate crime, third-degree assault as a hate crime and second-degree reckless endangerment as a hate crime, cops said. Othman has at least six prior arrests. He was charged with unlawful possession of marijuana in 2016, criminal possession of marijuana in 2017, possession of a forged instrument in 2019 and domestic violence with strangulation in 2020. He was arrested on two separate complaints on Feb.22,2021, according to police. He was arrested for criminal mischief after he got into an argument with his brother and broke a window with a mug, police said. He was also arrested after he had a fight with a private sanitation truck driver and charged with driving without a license and possession of psychedelic mushrooms, cops said. He was also driving with an open container of alcohol, police said. It wasn’t immediately clear if Othman had an attorney.

 

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Judge denies sentencing break to corrupt ex-Chicago cop Joseph Miedzianowski

A federal judge denied a sentencing break Wednesday to a man prosecutors have called the most corrupt cop in Chicago history. Joseph Miedzianowski,68, was among several federal defendants hoping to reduce their prison sentences under the First Step Act, signed into law by then-President Donald Trump in 2018. But U. S. District Judge Virginia Kendall denied Miedzianowski’s request Wednesday, finding that he was eligible for relief but that his “criminal behavior was extremely serious and harmed his community.” “Miedzianowski was no ordinary drug criminal,” Kendall wrote. Miedzianowski was convicted of running a Miami-to-Chicago drug-trafficking operation. In 2003, he was sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of distributing crack, supplying ammunition to gang members and revealing the identities of undercover cops to his criminal partners. Federal authorities said Miedzianowski also threatened to have lead prosecutor Brian Netols killed. Kendall noted that Miedzianowski “led a double-life and managed to deceive even those closest to him. He damaged numerous lives; not just his own.” “Even if Miedzianowski is truly remorseful, the court must consider the need to deter others from similar conduct,” Kendall wrote. “Given the gravity of Miedzianowski’s crimes, the court is hesitant to grant him early release when doing so could negatively impact respect for the law.” Kendall’s decision followed an order by U. S. District Judge Harry Leinenweber, who on Tuesday also denied Gangster Disciples leader Larry Hoover a sentencing break under the First Step Act. Contributing: Frank Main

 

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0.5
Diplo Sued by Woman Claiming He Pushed Her into Oral Sex

Diplo 's being sued by a woman who claims he coerced her into performing oral sex, and recorded it -- but the DJ's attorney tells us the whole thing is BS, and the woman's accusations are almost identical to those made by her alleged friend. According to the docs, obtained by TMZ, the alleged victim claims she was invited back to Diplo's after-party following one of his Vegas concerts at the Wynn in 2019... which she says she attended with friends, already intoxicated from drinking at the show. Once there, she says Diplo gave her and everyone else more weed and alcohol... which they accepted. She claims Diplo eventually invited her to his personal room, and his security team started kicking out everyone else... including a male friend, the bodyguards allegedly punched in the face when he refused to leave without her. The woman alleges Diplo told her she couldn't leave until she performed sex acts on him -- and after realizing there was no way out, she says she acquiesced and performed oral sex on him. The woman believes Diplo filmed the encounter without her consent. In fact, she says she wasn't fit to consent to any of it. She goes on to claim she was in fear for her safety throughout the alleged ordeal, and she's suing Diplo for damages. However, Diplo's attorney, Bryan Freedman, claims there's a connection between this woman and Shelly Auguste... who sued the DJ in June for sexual battery and made claims he filmed the encounter against her will. Freedman says, "This complaint is completely outrageous, wildly untrue and yet also entirely predictable, given that it simply repeats the exact same claim already made by the plaintiff’s friend Shelly Auguste, an individual who has been harassing Mr. Pentz and his family for more than a year and already has repeatedly violated the restraining order issued against her." He continues, "We have irrefutable evidence that this is a completely meritless claim and we will be providing it to a court as quickly as we possibly can to put an end to this shakedown by Ms. Auguste and her accomplices once and for all."

 

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Tennessee driver charged with attempted murder tried to plow down Memphis officer on sidewalk: court docs

A Tennessee man is facing several charges, including attempted murder, after allegedly swerving through traffic in downtown Memphis on the Fourth of July and intentionally hopping a sidewalk curb to run down a police officer, according to court documents. Following an arraignment hearing Wednesday, Orlando Davie,24, of Hernando, Mississippi, is being held on a $2.5 million bond in connection to the incident in downtown Memphis Monday night, Fox 13 Memphis reported. Court documents show that officers with the Memphis Police Department attempted to conduct a traffic stop around 7:15 p.m. at the intersection of Front Street and GE Patterson after Davis was spotted "speeding, swerving and endangering the lives of pedestrians." But Davie refused to stop, an affidavit says, and he instead drove into oncoming traffic, striking a Dodge Ram pickup. Davie fled the scene of the crash at a high rate of speed, but officers called off their pursuit due to safety concerns. An affidavit says Davie then made eye contact with an officer – and drove up onto the sidewalk in an attempt to run the officer over. The officer took cover to avoid being struck, WATN-TV reported. That officer later identified Davie in a photo lineup. Davie is charged with evading arrest involving an attempt to run down a police officer, vandalism of $2,500 to $10,000 and criminal attempted first-degree murder, WMC reported. His next court appearance is scheduled for July 14. Meanwhile, ambush attacks on law enforcement officers nationwide are up 91% year to date compared to 2020, a police group said last week. The National Fraternal Order of Police found that 51 law enforcement officers were shot,13 of whom died, in 40 ambush-style attacks as of June 30, a 91% jump from the same time last year. In all of 2020, there were 48 ambush-style attacks, which left 60 officers wounded,12 fatally, according to the group’s 2020 summary.

 

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0.3
RBI imposes penalty of up to Rs 2 cr on 14 banks for non-compliance

Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance. We, however, have a request. As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed. Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard. Digital Editor

 

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Three Hong Kong teens charged with terror bomb plot

A 15-year-old boy was among three Hong Kong teenagers charged with terror offences on Wednesday over an alleged bomb plot, in a case that exposed the deep political fissures coursing through the finance hub. Hong Kong police arrested nine people on Monday in an operation that they said dismantled an attempt to place bombs across the city. The group allegedly tried to make TATP, a high-powered explosive, from a hostel room although police say the plot was dismantled before it could fully develop. On Wednesday police charged three alleged cell members aged 19,17 and 15. The 15-year-old is the youngest person charged yet under a sweeping national security law that Beijing imposed on Hong Kong one year ago. The trio were denied bail and remanded in custody pending further investigations. At a court hearing on Wednesday, the lawyer of the 15-year-old said her client had given three hours of video testimony to police without a lawyer present. "He was told by the officers that he wouldn't need a lawyer when his mother was there," the lawyer said. The lawyer also said her client was forced to unlock his mobile phone by officers who pulled his hair and verbally threatened him. ALSO READ| Facebook, Google, Twitter say could quit Hong Kong over proposed data laws - report Six of the nine people arrested on Monday were secondary students, with the other three a driver, a member of university staff, and a secondary school worker. The remaining six were granted police bail. Semi-autonomous Hong Kong is a deeply polarised city after huge and often violent democracy protests convulsed the city for months in 2019. China has responded with an authoritarian crackdown, taking a more direct role in how the city is run and stamping out dissent. The national security law has radically changed the city's political and legal landscape. More than 120 people have been arrested under the law with those convicted facing up to life in prison. It has successfully curbed protests, but many residents in the city of 7.5 million still seethe under Beijing's rule. Source: News24

 

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1.9
Teen found guilty of murdering sisters in ‘blood pact with devil’

A British teen has been found guilty of murdering two sisters in a London park — after he claimed he had a blood pact with a demon to kill six women every six months in exchange for winning the lottery. Danyal Hussein,19, fatally stabbed Bibaa Henry,46, and her half-sister Nicole Smallman,27, last June as the social worker and photographer were celebrating Henry’s birthday, according to the Sun. Jurors were presented with a copy of Hussein’s ghastly handwritten “deal with the devil,” which was found in his bedroom and signed in his blood. Under that pact with Lucifuge Rofocale — the supposed “Prime Minister of Hell,” according to occultists — he pledged to “perform a minimum of six sacrifices every six months for as long as I am free and physically capable.” Hussein, who cut his hand badly in the brutal attack, dripped blood onto his victims and their belongings. After being arrested at his home, the cold-blooded Satan worshipper stared at his injuries but remained silent, the Sun reported. Hussein stabbed Smallman 28 times at Fryent Country Park and plunged the blade so hard into Henry that it broke. Investigators said the killer had undergone “a form of radicalization” in terms of exposure to occult material on the so-called dark web — and believe he would have murdered more women if he had not gotten injured, the Guardian reported. A day after committing the crime, Hussein went to a hospital to be treated for his hand injury, which he said happened when he was supposedly robbed at knifepoint. After the guilty verdict was announced, the judge adjourned Hussein’s sentencing to Sept.22 and ordered reports on his mental health and the impact of his autism, according to the Guardian. The sisters’ mother, the Rev. Mina Smallman, provided a moving victim impact statement in which she recalled their lives and described the evidence as “overwhelming.” She said her family had hoped Hussein would “do the right thing, a kindness and find some humanity in him” by pleading guilty. “No one expects their children to die before them but to have two of your three children murdered overnight is just incomprehensible,” Smallman said in the statement. Smallman, who was the Church of England’s first black female archdeacon, said that losing her daughters was “enough to shake a person’s faith” but “fortunately, it did not.” “If any good comes out of this at least another four women will not meet a similar end in a so-called pact with a so-called demon,” she said. Nicole’s partner, Adam Stone, made the horrorific discovery after looking for the women after they failed to come home. “Nicole is my first thought, my second and every thought thereafter and if I am lucky enough to fall asleep then I see her in my dreams. This is all I have left of her,” Stone told the court. Hussein’s DNA was found on the sisters’ bodies, nearby foliage and a knife at the scene. Latex gloves covered in his blood also were discovered near a pond where their phones had been thrown. The twisted killer was obsessed with the idea of becoming a multimillionaire and believed the only way to do it was to strike a sick pact with a demon. Two days before his attack, Hussein bought a knife block from Asda, a UK supermarket chain, and a roll of gaffer tape. He had also ordered two shovels from Amazon and a face mask. The sisters snapped a heartbreaking final photograph with the monster lurking in the darkness waiting to strike. On the day their bodies were discovered, he reportedly bought three lottery tickets. Hussein later claimed that various surveillance videos of him showed someone else who looked like him. He even claimed that bloodstains at the scene were not his — or if they were, they had been transferred there by “foxes and rabbits,” the Sun reported. “This is one of the most shocking and chilling cases I have ever dealt with, and I know the investigation will stay with all of those involved for many years to come,” Detective Chief Inspector Simon Harding said, according to the outlet. “Hussein went out that night with the intention of killing in order to satisfy his bizarre fantasies under the deluded belief he would be rewarded with financial prosperity,” he said.

 

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Lori Vallow Daybell Requests Change of Venue, Claiming a ‘Fair and Impartial Jury Cannot Be Had’ in County Where Kids’ Bodies Were Buried

Lori Vallow Daybell, the Arizona woman facing murder charges for the deaths of her children, has asked an Idaho judge to move her trial to a different county, claiming that she cannot currently receive a fair trial. Vallow’s attorney Mark Means filed the change of venue motion on June 28. Thin on details, the filing does not provide a specific reason for Vallow’s request beyond saying that a “fair and impartial jury trial cannot be had in Fremont County, [Idaho],” where the case is currently filed. Vallow’s motion promises that future filings will provide more information. “[This motion] shall be supported by the papers and pleadings of/in this case, the memorandum of law to be filed, evidence to be submitted and the evidence to be adduced at the hearing of this Motion,” Vallow’s filing said. Vallow,47, is charged with murdering her two children. The remains of Joshua “JJ” Vallow,7, and Tylee Ryan,16, were found on the property of Vallow’s husband, Chad Daybell,52, in June 2020. Daybell is also charged with murder in the children’s deaths. The grisly discovery came after months of speculation and suspicion as to the children’s location. Neither JJ nor Tylee had been seen since September 2019; meanwhile, Vallow and Daybell got married in Hawaii on Nov.15,2019, while JJ and Tylee were missing. According to police, Vallow descended into cult-like religious beliefs, including believing that she was an “exalted Goddess” and that she and Chad Daybell were “directed to lead 144,000 people in preparing for the end of the world.” She and Chad also believed that they had the ability to teleport. Vallow and Daybell are implicated in multiple other deaths. Daybell is charged with first-degree murder in the death of his ex-wife, Tammy Daybell,49, and Vallow is charged with conspiring in her killing. Tammy was found dead in October 2019, but her death was not immediately considered suspicious, although investigators have since exhumed her body and ruled that her death was a homicide. Chad Daybell originally said that Tammy had died in her sleep, and refused an autopsy. Vallow is also charged in connection with the death of her ex-husband, Charles Vallow, who was shot and killed in July 2019 by Lori’s brother Alex Cox. At the time, Cox claimed self-defense, and no charges were filed. Cox died in 2020 of what medical examiners said was a blood clot. Vallow was Lori’s fourth husband; JJ was their adopted son. Tylee Ryan was the daughter of Lori and her third husband, Joseph Ryan, who died in April 2018 from natural causes, according to Arizona officials. Cox, Vallow’s brother, had reportedly tased Ryan in 2008 and threatened to kill him, and Vallow herself was heard on audio saying that she wanted to kill Ryan. But Arizona authorities confirmed to Law&Crime in March that Ryan died from heart problems. Ryan was also accused of physically and sexually abusing Tylee, as well as his son from another relationship, Colby Ryan. Days after the Lori Vallow was indicted and charged with murdering her children, Judge Steven Boyce issued a stay in the proceedings, finding that Vallow was not competent to participate in the case. Boyce issued a second stay on June 8, after another determination that Vallow was not competent to proceed. Vallow’s attorney also filed additional motions on June 28—one reserving Vallow’s rights and defenses, specifically the right to challenge any court’s jurisdiction over the case, even if the motion to transfer is granted, and a request for specific discovery regarding autopsy reports, witnesses, and communications regarding the charges against her. Vallow requested oral arguments and a hearing date. Vallow’s attorney did not immediately respond to Law&Crime’s request for comment. Read Vallow’s motion for a change of venue, below: Have a tip we should know? [email protected]

 

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0.3
American Political Prisoner Asks Russian Court To Serve Sentence In US: REPORT

Russian political prisoner Paul Whelan, a U. S. citizen and former Marine, will reportedly request to serve the remainder of his sentence in the U. S. Whelan, who was arrested by Russian authorities more than two years ago and sentenced to 16 years in prison last year, will seek to be transferred from Correctional Colony No.17 in Mordovia, which is known as one of the toughest prisons in Russia, Radio Free Europe reported. Whelan has alleged that prison guards have mistreated him and recently spent three weeks at a medical facility for injuries he obtained at a labor camp, his brother recently told CNN. “We are preparing a petition to the Moscow City Court about transferring Whelan to serve his sentence in the United States,” Whelan’s lawyer Olga Karlova said on Wednesday, according to Radio Free Europe. President Joe Biden discussed Whelan and other political prisoners during his June summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, CNBC reported. Putin and Secretary of State Antony Blinken have also separately acknowledged that a potential prisoner swap was on the table and could be negotiated. “To the families, detained Americans came up and we discussed it, and we are going to follow through with that discussion. I am not going to walk away on that,” Biden told reporters on the final day of the summit. Russian law enforcement arrested Whelan on espionage charges in December 2018 and sentenced him in June 2020. Whelan allegedly possessed a flash drive containing classified Russian information, which he said was given to him by a Russian acquaintance, according to Reuters. Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo slammed the conviction as “appalling” and said the trial was conducted in secret and without the proper allowances of witnesses. Whelan has maintained his innocence and has called upon Biden to resolve the situation “as quickly as possible,” according to CNN. “It’s pretty simple. There was no crime. There was no evidence. The secret trial was a sham,” Whelan told CNN in a phone interview from a labor camp last month. “This was done purely for political motive.”

 

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0.2
Judge Frees 76-Year-Old Woman Sent Back to Federal Prison After Missing a Phone Call from Officials

A judge's mercy has kept the federal Bureau of Prisons from needlessly sending a 76-year-old Baltimore woman back behind bars because she left home to attend a computer class and missed a call from authorities looking for her. Gwen Levi served 16 years of her federal sentence for dealing heroin before being released last summer to home confinement as part of the Trump administration's effort to reduce the federal prison population to slow the spread of COVID-19. She was one of 4,500 federal prisoners to be sent home. In late June, the Washington Post reports, Levi attended a class in-person to learn word processing. This trip triggered her ankle monitor. When prison officials called her, she didn't answer the phone, and so this was all treated as an "escape." She was picked up and taken back to jail for transfer back to federal prison for this minor, nonviolent violation. But Levi was doing the exact sort of thing we want prisoners to do when we release them early—learn skills that will help them become gainfully employed. Dragging her back to prison is a particularly egregious example of how post-release monitoring sometimes leads to people being punished for technical rule violations which are completely disconnected from harmful, illegal behavior. There's been a push by criminal justice activists, supported by some friendly politicians, to reform the system by which people under supervised release get thrown back in jail for " technical violations " of rules that aren't criminal in nature. On Tuesday, the Post reports, Judge Deborah K. Chasanow of the U. S. District Court for the District of Maryland ordered Levi freed under compassionate release guidelines, writing, "the court concludes it would do little to serve the goals of sentencing to require her to return to full custody." She'll still have to serve five years of parole, though she can request that her parole be suspended after one year. "Sending her back to prison for going to a computer class was shameful," Kevin Ring, president of justice reform organization FAMM, said in a prepared statement . "She deserves to be home. But this fight is far from over. It's time for the Biden administration to ensure that the 4,000 people on home confinement get to stay home with their families, too." Ring is referring to the unclear future of all those other federal prisoners sent home last year. The COVID-related early releases were not intended to be permanent; as the Trump administration ended, the Justice Department announced that those prisoners would have to return back to prison after the pandemic has concluded. It's been a year since these releases, and so far, according to the Post, only 185 of these released prisoners have been returned to federal custody, and only five of them had committed new crimes. Now criminal justice reformers are attempting to pressure the Justice Department under President Joe Biden to rescind the memo and allow these people to remain on monitored release after the pandemic ends. So far, the administration has been reluctant to commit to this. A spokesperson for the Department of Justice told The New York Times that the Bureau of Prisons would have the discretion to allow released inmates to remain at home if they are close to the end of their sentences. But does "discretion" actually mean anything given what happened to Levi? If the vast majority of these released inmates have been causing no problems on supervised release, is there any criminal justice purpose served by forcing them back into jail cells that isn't just a punitive response? If the goal of prison is rehabilitation, the appropriate response to those who have been released, but who continue to abide by the law, is to continue this experiment. Perhaps there's even a valuable lesson here about the excessive lengths of some of our federal sentences.

 

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0.8
Philly Cop Who Allegedly Deleted Witness Video During Arrest Sued

The police officer who allegedly deleted a witness video -- while his body cam was rolling, no less -- is now facing a lawsuit over the incident. The Philly cop -- ID'd in the suit as Officer Burnett -- just got slapped with a lawsuit by Jacob Giddings... the guy who claims his footage was scrubbed back in March while Burnett was trying to take him into custody on an arrest warrant. According to the suit, obtained by TMZ, Giddings says he was pumping gas when Burnett ran his tags, identifying Giddings as someone who had a warrant out for his arrest. While Giddings was in his vehicle, he says Burnett approached him from outside... asking him to step out of the vehicle without an explanation. Things allegedly escalated from there. Giddings claims Burnett began trying to forcibly remove him from the car. BTW, Giddings says he had begun recording with his phone at this point... feeling uneasy about the whole thing. After a lot of tussling -- and the arrival of a 2nd officer -- Giddings says he surrendered, and was cuffed and put into the back of a squad car. Giddings says Burnett then proceeded to search his car and found the phone that had been recording. Giddings makes a bombshell claim -- he says Burnett ran over his phone, with Giddings' own vehicle, in an attempt to destroy the evidence! Giddings claims that after realizing the phone was STILL recording and not destroyed at all, Burnett then took it upon himself to delete the video -- only to play dumb when asked by Giddings if it was still on there. He's suing for assault, battery, excessive force and illegal search and seizure. Of course, Giddings says Burnett's own body-cam was rolling during what Giddings says was the moment he tried getting rid of evidence... and Giddings insists it's the smoking gun that proves his case. Lucky for Giddings... he says he was able to recover the allegedly deleted clips, and now -- he's asking for damages. Meanwhile, the department says it's investigating this matter internally, and that the cop in question here has been placed on leave.

 

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0.3
After 5 Years Of Appeals, Former Cop Convicted Of Forcing Teens To Strip Naked During Traffic Stop Begins 10 Year Sentence

After five years of appeals, a former Florida police officer convicted of coercing a teenage boy and girl to strip naked at a traffic stop in exchange of avoiding arrest in 2019 began a 10-year prison sentence last Thursday. Former Miccosukee police officer Michael Martinez was convicted of extortion in 2019 for forcing two teens to run naked in order to avoid arrest, FOX7 Miami reported. Martinez had reportedly run out of appeals as of last Thursday and was handcuffed in a Broward County courtroom to begin his sentence, according to Fox News. “One of the victims actually made his way down here today, because he wanted to see this to get some sort of sense of closure,” prosecutor Chris Killoran said, FOX7 reported. In August 2016, teens Remy Riley and her then-boyfriend Kyle Shoulta, both now in their 20s, were driving from Tampa, Florida to Fort Lauderdale to attend a concert when Martinez pulled them over for running a stop sign, according to Fox News. The former officer reportedly pulled them over and threatened to arrest the teens on drug and alcohol possession charges after finding marijuana and alcohol in their car. (RELATED: Video Shows Police Officer Breaking Down In Tears After Killing Woman Who Allegedly Shot At Him) Martinez then gave the teens a choice — follow him to a remote location, strip naked and run or face arrest. In testimony during a Broward trial in October 2019, the teens both said they felt intimidated, threatened and as if they had no choice but to follow Martinez’s orders, the Florida Sun Sentinel reported. “I was given a choice of go to jail or run, so I took the choice to run naked,” Shoulta testified in 2019, according to the station, Fox News reported. “I took my pants off. I took my shirt off,” Riley told the jury during the 2019 trial, according to Fox. “I kind of looked at him like, ‘Is this enough?’ He’s like, ‘That’s it?’” Martinez also tried to solicit a sexual act from Riley, according to a spokeswoman from the Broward State Attorney’s Office. “That is not what I wanted to do. I felt like I had no choice,” Riley said on the stand, Fox reported. “At 18 years old, I don’t feel like you should know what to do. I felt like that was his job.” (RELATED: Florida Cop Goes Free After Allegedly Forcing Woman To Give Him Oral Sex) The former officer was fired one year following the incident and will serve 10 years in prison, Fox News reported.

 

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0.5
Parents of kidnapped students in Nigeria plea for help

KANO, Nigeria (AP) — Praying, crying and waiting for news about their children, the parents of more than 120 Nigerian students abducted by armed bandits at the Bethel Baptist High School in the nation’s northern Kaduna state have been gathering at the school awaiting updates about their children. Some weeping mothers pleaded for help from Kaduna State Governor Nasir Ahmad el-Rufai. A group of gunmen stormed the school early Monday, at around 2 a.m., shooting sporadically as they kidnapped the students, according to the police. Two security guards lost their lives while battling the kidnappers, said Kaduna’s governor. The Rev. Ishaya Jangado, head of the Kaduna Baptist Conference that manages the school, led prayers Tuesday and said the kidnappers made contact with him. He was allowed to talk with some students who confirmed that they were fine and said that the number of pupils abducted was 121. “We had a call from the bandits. They assured that our children are well,” Jangado said. “They (the students) counted themselves in the jungle and they gave us information that they are 121,” he added. He added that 28 students escaped from the abduction, some hiding in the school and others running away during the assault on Monday. Jangado said that he met with members of the government who vowed to work to rescue the students and bring them back home. Tragically such school abductions are becoming common in northern Nigeria, where nearly 1,000 students have been kidnapped from schools since December. The U. N. Children’s Agency said the abductions on Monday are the “latest incident in an alarming spate of attacks against children and abductions, including of students, in parts of West and Central Africa.” The organization estimates at least 950 students have been abducted by armed gunmen since December, with more than half of the abductions occurring in the past six weeks alone. This is the fourth abduction of students in Kaduna state in the past six months. There have been seven mass kidnappings of students in Nigeria so far this year. The abductions are being carried out by armed groups who want ransoms. Public affairs analyst Malam Bashir Mohammed has attributed the disturbing rise of kidnappings to poverty, unemployment and greed. The recent spate of kidnappings has become Nigeria’s worst-case scenario, he said, proving difficult to handle despite the efforts of security agents. He called on Nigeria’s leaders to rise to the challenge. “I can’t imagine the way and manner these agents of banditry should be allowed to wreak havoc on innocent people for no just cause,” he said. “The government ought to take firm and ruthless action against the perpetrators of the despicable act.” “Kidnapping is gaining credence in the country, because it has been considered by those blatantly committing the act as a legitimate business,” he said, adding that some have succeeded in getting ransoms without being apprehended. Many schools have been forced to close as authorities are unable to adequately protect them. The spate of mass abductions from schools in Nigeria has grown significantly since 2014 when members of the jihadi rebels Boko Haram abducted 276 female students from a government school in Chibok in northeastern Borno State. ___ AP journalists John Shiklam in Kano, Nigeria, and Carley Petesch in Dakar, Senegal contributed. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

 

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0.3
Army Reservist With Hitler Mustache Who Worked at Weapons Facility Will Remain Jailed Pending Trial in U. S. Capitol Siege, D. C. Circuit Rules

Affirming the pre-trial detention of a white supremacist Army Reservist, the D. C. Circuit on Wednesday unanimously upheld a standard for keeping those charged with the breach of the U. S. Capitol locked up before trial. Those defendants do not need to be charged with a crime of violence to be considered a danger to the community, the court ruled. A Navy contractor at a weapons facility in New Jersey, Timothy Louis Hale-Cusanelli espoused a hateful ideology and violent fantasies, which are detailed at length in court papers. Prosecutors embedded photographs showing him posing with an Adolf Hitler mustache and sharing racist memes about Black people and Jews. When authorities searched his apartment, investigators found copies of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf and neo-Nazi writer William Luther Pierce’s The Turner Diaries, the same tome that inspired Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. In 2010, Hale-Cusanelli was arrested with three other people after one used a homemade PVC launcher—also known as a potato gun—to fire frozen corn cobs at a home in New Jersey. He pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. The gun was marked with the words “WIDOWMAKER” and “WHITE IS RIGHT” as well as with a drawing of the Confederate flag. Despite the alarming rhetoric and symbols, U. S. Magistrate Judge Tonianne J. Bongiovanni, from the District of New Jersey, ordered Hale-Cusanelli’s conditional release on bail on Jan.19. The District of D. C.’s Chief Judge Beryl Howell quickly stayed that ruling pending review by U. S. District Judge Trevor N. McFadden, who reversed the release order on March 23. Days later, the D. C. Circuit issued a ruling that led to the pre-trial release of so-called “ zip-tie guy ” Eric Munchel, who was seen roaming around the Capitol with his mother carrying plastic handcuffs. The decision was a boon to those accused of breaching the Capitol more broadly by emphasizing a principle for pre-trial detention: “In our society, liberty is the norm, and detention before trial is an exception.” Hale-Cusanelli appealed his detention order in light of the Munchel decision, arguing that his alleged non-violent offenses mandated his pre-trial release. Writing for a three-judge panel, U. S. Circuit Judge Robert Wilkins found otherwise. “We did not hold in Munchel that only those persons who participated in violence on January 6 could properly be considered as posing a future danger to the community justifying pretrial detention,” Wilkins, a Barack Obama appointee, wrote in a 13-page opinion, emphasizing that ruling’s limited holding. “To the contrary, we explained in Munchel that a person could be deemed a danger to the community sufficient to justify detention even without posing a threat of committing violence in the future,” the opinion states. Later, Wilkins added: “The point of Munchel was that everyone who entered the Capitol on January 6 did not necessarily pose the same risk of danger and the preventive detention statute should apply to the January 6 defendants the same as it applies to everyone else, not that the January 6 defendants should get the special treatment of an automatic exemption from detention if they did not commit violence on that particular day.” Joined by U. S. Circuit Judges David Tatel (a Clinton appointee) and Neomi Rao (appointed by Trump), Wilkins found that the lower court could — and properly did — consider Hale-Cusanelli’s extreme views on “civil war.” “Thomas Jefferson said the tree of liberty should be refreshed with the blood of patriots and tyrants,” Hale-Cusanelli is quoted saying in the ruling. Statements like that were a proper basis of the lower court judge’s consideration, the D. C. Circuit found. “It is not obviously wrong to conclude that these statements, taken as a whole, demonstrate a potential danger to the community,” the ruling states. “This is particularly so when viewed with other statements Appellant made just prior to January 6, such as proclaiming a ‘final countdown’ and an intention to leave his employment in a ‘blaze of glory.'” Hale-Cusanelli’s lawyer Jonathan W. Crisp did not immediately respond to an email requesting comment. Read the ruling below: [Photo of Hale-Cusanelli via the Justice Department] Have a tip we should know? [email protected]

 

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0.7
Protester Arrested After Shooting Olympic Torch With Water Pistol

Police in eastern Japan have arrested a woman who fired a water pistol at an Olympic torch in protest at the Tokyo Games, which begin this month. A viral video of the incident on July 4 shows bystanders watching the Olympic torch relay in the city of Mito, Ibaraki Prefecture, when 53-year-old Kayoko Takahashi lifts what appears to be a plastic water gun and takes aim at a passing torch bearer. She is stopped by two security officers, the clip shows. Takahashi was arrested on suspicion of discharging the water pistol as well as "forcible obstruction of business," the newspaper said. The 77-year-old runner targeted by the protester was anchoring the day's relay event around Senba Park, the newspaper reported. The torch run concluded as scheduled. Takahashi admitted the offenses, the paper added, but it is not yet clear whether she has been formally charged. Sunday's incident was filmed by Takahashi's partner, Reuters reported on Tuesday. The couple from the city of Hitachi—roughly 60 miles northeast of Tokyo—had traveled to Mito for the event. Hotori Amano, Takahashi's partner of 17 years, told Reuters he "had no idea that his girlfriend had a water gun," nor was he aware of her plans to disrupt the torch relay. While spraying the torch, Takahashi reportedly shouted: "Extinguish the torch fire, I'm against the Tokyo Olympics!" The Japanese public is divided on the question of whether the Games, which are scheduled to begin on July 23 after a one-year delay, should go ahead. Recent polling has found that more than half the public opposes the hosting of the Tokyo Games as the coronavirus pandemic continues. Some surveys reported that 80 percent of respondents were opposed. Japan has averaged over 1,000 new COVID-19 cases each day in July, with Tokyo accounting for one-third to half of new infections. Reported deaths each day have remained in single to double digits. Less than 15 percent of Japan's population has been fully vaccinated—far behind the nations leading the race towards full vaccination, as seen in the chart below, produced by Statista. The decision is being influenced by increasing COVID-19 infections, the newspaper said, which are driving up public concern and dissatisfaction with the government's handling of the pandemic. The government is scheduled to hold meetings with relevant parties, including the Tokyo Olympic committee, on Thursday.

 

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0.2
High court to decide fate of Detroit charter revision plan

Lawyers argued Wednesday about whether Detroiters should be able to vote next month on wide-ranging revisions to their city charter regardless of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's opinion on the matter in a hearing before the Michigan Supreme Court. Under lower court rulings so far, judges have found "the power and authority lies with the governor and the governor alone," who rejected the plan on April 30, said Aaron Phelps, a lawyer for the Detroit Charter Revision Commission and Detroit City Clerk Janice Winfrey. But, Phelps argued, the 1909 Home Rule City Act includes numerous provisions giving the power over charter revisions to the locals. "Nothing in the act requires the governor’s signature before the revision may be submitted for election," Phelps said, arguing that amendments, not revisions, must be submitted to the governor. Where there are inconsistencies in state statute about the process, the 1963 state constitution requires those questions to be "liberally construed in favor of the city," he said. "We don’t construe it in favor of the governor and give her a right that is not set forth expressly in the statute and which would be totally inconsistent with the theory of home rule," Phelps said. The Michigan Supreme Court took the case under advisement at the end of the roughly 30-minute hearing. The hearing came after the state Court of Appeals affirmed a Wayne County Circuit Court order to remove the charter revision plan, Proposal P, from the Aug.3 ballot, in part because the initiative did not receive Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's approval. The city has continued printing ballots with the proposal on it while the case is awaiting a decision from the high court. The initiative the Detroit Charter Revision Commission crafted seeks permanent charter changes — including ones related to expanded access to public transit and broadband internet, water affordability and increased transparency and policing reforms — after three years of review and drafting by the nine-member commission. Justice David Viviano on Wednesday questioned whether Phelps' arguments were inconsistent with the way the commission acted in submitting the proposal to the governor. "Your client apparently followed what appears to be the routine that the people have followed for the last 100 years, which is they submit revisions to the governor to receive the governor's input well in advance of the election," Viviano said. Jason Hanselman, an attorney for two of the plaintiffs challenging the proposal, echoed Viviano's comments and argued the "plain language" in state law requires the revisions be submitted to the governor for either approval or the return of the proposal. "The charter commission's actions that we've just heard show that it agreed that those are the only two paths," Hanselman said. Early confusion about a missed deadline and differing versions of the proposed charter show the need for the governor's involvement to protect voters, he added. Justice Richard Bernstein questioned the effect of the governor's involvement and whether her intervention was necessary prior to the proposal hitting the ballot box. "Why shouldn’t the default be to allow for people to have the opportunity and the right to vote?" Bernstein asked. "…If I’m not happy with what the (Detroit Charter Review Commission) did, I can vote accordingly, right?” Whitmer and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan have warned the costs of adopting the charter provisions would put the city into bankruptcy again and prompt active oversight by the Financial Review Commission. Detroit's top financial officials initially estimated the revisions would cost $3.4 billion over four years, and the forecasted cost was lowered to $2 billion after charter commissioners changed the plan. Michigan Chief Financial Officer Jay Rising's office has said if the revised charter is approved in August, as drafted, the city's four-year financial plan will no longer be balanced. The plan was developed in part by the Detroiters' Bill of Rights Coalition. The group, featuring environmental, immigrant and disability advocates, along with housing, water and transit experts, seeks to embed "fundamental human and civil rights" in the charter. eleblanc@detroitnews.com Staff writer Mark Hicks contributed.

 

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0.8
There’s Major Updates In The WAGatha Christie Scandal Court Proceedings

Celebrity The pair's legal battle just got even more complicated. When Coleen Rooney publicly accused Rebekah Vardy of selling stories about her to the press back in October 2019, she sent the internet into a tailspin. Via a bombshell social media statement, Rooney,33, ignited the now infamous " WAGatha Christie " debate with four simple words and a supersized ellipsis: "It's.......... Rebekah Vardy's account." Despite the media furore, Vardy has vehemently denied all accusations and, in June 2020, the WAGatha Christie feud officially reached the courts. And the drama is... instense. Here are the key developments you need to know about. The scandal first came to light when Rooney claimed to have set a trap to discover who was leaking the private information she shared among friends and family on a closed Instagram account. "After a long time of trying to figure out who it could be, for various reasons, I had a suspicion,” she wrote. Rooney said she had planted fake stories about her life via a private Instagram account and "blocked everyone from viewing [her] Instagram stories except ONE account." She then claimed that person was Vardy. The caption read "This has been a burden in my life for a few years now and finally I have got to the bottom of it......" Within a matter of days, the post had amassed hundreds of thousands of likes and comments and had made national headlines. In response to Rooney's claims, Vardy wrote: "I'm not being funny but I don't need the money, what would I gain from selling stories on you?” She added: "I liked you a lot Coleen & I'm so upset that you have chosen to do this." The mum of five later revealed she was taken to hospital three times while pregnant as she suffered anxiety attacks over the spat, reports The Sun. In May, The Sun reported that the two women and their legal teams attempted to sort the issue out via a Zoom arbitration meeting, but things ended in " deadlock." With no resolution, the case was taken to London's High Court after Vardy launched libel proceedings against Rooney in June. The court case started on Nov.19 with a preliminary hearing. During the hearing, Justice Warby, who is presiding over the case, was asked to determine the “natural and ordinary” meaning of Rooney’s Instagram posts, which accused Vardy of leaking stories. Vardy’s lawyers argued that the meaning was that she had “consistently and repeatedly betrayed the defendant’s trust over several years by leaking the defendant’s private and personal Instagram posts and stories for publication in The Sun. " Vardy's lawyers also stated that, as a result of Rooney’s posts, their client experienced so much stress she feared she would lose her baby, and that she continued "to suffer severe and extreme hostility and abuse as a result of the post," especially on social media. Rooney’s team argued that Vardy "was in fact responsible for consistently passing on information about the defendant’s private Instagram posts and stories to The Sun." Rooney also alleged "this was part of the [Vardy’s] established history and habitual practice of providing private information to journalists and the press." During the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, Justice Warby ruled in favour or Vardy. He said that Rooney's post in October 2019 had directed guilt at Vardy, meaning her and her legal team would need to prove that it was in fact Vardy who was leaking stories to the press. The case became more complex on Dec.13 when court documents revealed that Rooney was accusing Vardy of setting up paparazzi photos with other WAGs for money. Legal papers sent to the High Court said that Vardy “insisted” that the other wives and girlfriends of some of England’s 2018 World Cup team had pictures taken outside a restaurant in St Petersburg. Rooney alleged that Vardy “worked with a number of agencies to bolster her public persona.” Vardy denied this. On Jan.2,2021, there was another development, with Vardy’s lawyers claiming Rooney did not write the sensationalist post alone. Per The Sun, new legal papers claim Rooney had help from "third parties" including lawyers who looked over “various drafts” before they were posted to her social media channels. "It is inferred that the defendant had assistance from third parties in preparing the post and that various drafts were prepared in advance," reads the document, via The Sun. Vardy’s legal team also questioned whether Rooney’s investigation was thorough and if she considered the leaks came from her own entourage or her husband's entourage before she made the allegations public. They added: "The defendant’s ‘careful investigation’ lasted for five weeks and one day, not the five months referred to in the post and did not involve any investigation into other sources of the 'leaks.'" They also argue that Rooney "reached a (false) conclusion" on a "flawed investigation," adding that the defendant|rushed to publication without properly considering the evidence or making any further inquiry." And so the bitter legal battle rages on. As of July 7, Rebecca Vardy’s legal team have successfully argued for certain aspects of Coleen Rooney’s defence to be ruled out after they were deemed “irrelevant”. The judge dismissed Rooney’s claim that Vardy was “publicity seeking” when choosing to sit behind Rooney during the 2016 European Championships game “to guarantee her appearance in the media”. Per The Evening Standard, Mrs Justice Steyn said that “the fact that a person seeks media coverage of their own attendance at a football match” does not mean that they are more likely to “disclose private information about another person to the press.” Rebekah Vardy's lawyers previously argued that the authorship of the Sun's column, The Secret Wag, was not relevant to the trial. And while Mrs Justice Steyn threw out an allegation that Vardy was leaking information on the libel case itself to the newspaper, she ruled that the alleged close relationship between Vardy and the newspaper will still be considered as was "one of the building blocks" of Coleen Rooney's case. (Rooney’s lawyers argue that it shows a "history and practice of publicly disclosing private information about other people she was friendly or associated with," per BBC News.) Meanwhile Vardy’s legal team, per Evening Standard, argue Rooney “has gone through the claimant’s appearances in the newspapers, put two and two together and made seven.” Vardy's bid for a summary judgment – a legal step which would effectively resolve the case without the need for a trial – was also dismissed, so the legal dispute will continue to play out in court. Contributions from L'Oréal Blackett, Alice Broster, and Rebecca Fearn. This article was originally published on May 11, 2020

 

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0.2
Rob Manfred’s split-doubleheaders are stealing from baseball fans

This ought to be a layup for Ron Manfred, and the embattled commissioner of baseball sure could use a couple of point-blank easy decisions. Manfred has developed a reputation – and it is earned, make no mistake – for caring far more about baseball fans he wants to cultivate as opposed to the ones he already has. There is a belief – fairly or unfairly but, again, well-earned – that he doesn’t much like the sport over which he has held guardianship since 2015. He needs a layup. Here is his layup. Sometime Wednesday – too late to save Mets fans who had a separate-admission, seven-inning doubleheader foisted on them, but in plenty of time to spare untold thousands of others going forward – he must announce an immediate executive order as of the start of business Thursday: These out-in-the-open bits of larceny must end. At once. From now on – immediately – if inclement weather forces cancellation of a game there are two, and only two, options: 1) A single-admission doubleheader with two seven-inning games. 2) A separate-admission doubleheader with two nine-inning games. That’s it. That’s all it will take. In the eyes of a lot of baseball fans that won’t be nearly enough of a roll-back to undo the damage that Manfred has already inflicted on the game, but at least it will keep his owners from – and there’s no delicate way to put this – STEALING FROM THEIR CUSTOMERS. We can debate the merits or the malevolence of the two Manfred creations that haunt traditional baseball fans every day. The ghost runner at second base to begin the 10 th inning remains an intolerable departure for a lot of baseball fans; even purists might’ve been persuaded to accept this if, say, the free runner didn’t enter the game until, say, the 12 th inning. But compromise isn’t high on Manfred’s list of skillsets. And so we also had the introduction of seven-inning double-headers last year. And in the context of 2020, you could make the argument they made sense: limit the possibilities of Covid exposure, allow teams with multiple make-up dates to do so in a manner that wouldn’t completely wipe them out. Plus, games have been decided in five, six, seven, and eight innings going back to the beginning of time thanks to poor weather. Also, a year ago, there were no fans in the stands. They didn’t have to be part of the solution because they simply weren’t part of the plan, period. But they are now. And, look: you can have a reasonable debate about seven-inning doubleheaders. Both sides have valid arguments. But only as single-admission affairs. Separate admission? That isn’t just wrong. That’s stealing. Folks who bought tickets to the Mets-Yankees game Sunday night did so believing they would get a nine-inning game. Same deal with the fans who bought Brewers-Mets tickets for Wednesday night. If you shell out for a Broadway play and the house lights came on midway through the second act, you wouldn’t stand for that, would you? If you bought a price fix dinner and suddenly were told you had to leave the restaurant before dessert, that would cause an incident, wouldn’t it? It’s the same thing here. Baseball fans pay through the nose as it is to watch these games in person – tickets, parking, hot dogs, merch, on and on. Now you’re randomly knocking two innings off the program they have already paid for in advance? And if anyone has offered up a 22 percent refund on these games, I sure haven’t heard about that yet. Have you? One person has the power to stop this – Manfred. It won’t recast his image, or his legacy, but it would show he has at least a passing interest in doing right by his fans. And we already know he wouldn’t be restrained by hoary old handcuffs that might’ve hindered past commissioners who actually seemed to care about the integrity of the games and the continuity of seasons. Lucky for Manfred, he’s already shown contempt for both. Not only has he ushered in ghost runners and seven-inning doubleheaders, he merrily and unilaterally rushed in on-field strip-searches of pitchers midway through a season. He has shown a willingness to act boldly, if not always wisely. He has the chance to do both here. He has the chance to end the farce of separate-admission seven-inning doubleheaders right now, immediately, today. Take the layup, Commissioner. Take the damned layup.

 

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1.3
The Parable of the Soldier at the Bank

I recently participated a great conference at corpus linguistics and the Second Amendment, and will post thoughts on that soon. But in the meantime, I wanted to share a parable that I discovered on Twitter and found very helpful, posted by C'Zar Bernstein. On one occasion an expert in the law stood up to test the Linguist. "Linguist," he asked, "what must I do to correctly interpret this Law?" "What is written in the Law?" he replied. "How do you read it?" The Judge answered, "the Law says, 'no person shall bear arms at or near any bank.' This proscribes carrying arms at or near rivers or lakes." "You have answered incorrectly," the Linguist replied, "this means that no person shall perform any military service at or near financial institutions." But the Judge wanted the Linguist to justify himself, so he asked, "And how did you come to that conclusion?" In reply the Linguist said: "I conducted a corpus linguistics analysis of the words 'bear arms' and 'bank.' In the first case, I found that 'bear arms' had an idiomatic sense to do with military service that was used more frequently than the literal sense you favored." The Linguist continued: "In the second case, I found that the sense to do with financial institutions was used more frequently than the sense to do with bodies of water. Go and hold likewise!" The Judge replied, "I cannot. My law clerk discovered one piece of historical evidence about this Law in particular that refutes your very general background evidence." The Judge continued: "The Law's author said in a newspaper article defending the Law, 'the recent public shooting at the river demands action!'" And with this one piece of evidence, the Judge moved the mountain of evidence supplied by the corpus data into the dustbin. This isn't to say that legal corpus linguistics evidence is never useful or relevant, but it's a nice illustration of the times it is less so.

 

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0.4
Andy Dick and fiancée Elisa Jordana break up after his assault arrest

Andy Dick and fiancée Elisa Jordana have broken up after he was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. Jordana opened up about the split on her YouTube show, “ Kermit and Friends,” saying she “did love Andy at one point” but said the relationship turned “bad” after he consistently turned to his ex-lover Lucas Crawford. “I was willing to forgive him for his criminal charges, for always running to Lucas, choosing Lucas over me, choosing guys over me constantly, just being bad overall,” she explained. Jordana said she reached her breaking point when Dick forgot her birthday and showed up to her party late, only to allegedly ask her mother “for pills.” “That was bad, but then worse” she claimed, adding that he left after a short time to meet up with Crawford — the man who Dick claims broke his leg during their brawl. Jordana said 55-year-old Dick has since blocked her on Instagram so she wouldn’t be able to see his content. “I just put in so much effort. I want to step back because… I think I can think more clearly,” she shared of the breakup. “… I am independent, so if anyone wants to date me please reach out to me. “I’m available.” A rep for Dick didn’t immediately return Page Six’s request for comment. LAPD confirmed to Page Six at the end of June that Dick was arrested for allegedly assaulting Crawford with a metal chair. After Dick was bailed out of jail, a spokesperson for the troubled comic explained to us that Dick and Crawford were “play fighting and razzing each other and Andy says next thing he knew, things turned serious for Lucas.” The rep claimed Dick then responded to the attack in self-defense. “Andy got defensive and scared and tried to limp away from him,” the rep told Page Six. “That’s when he grabbed the nearest chair and threw it in Lucas’ direction. The corner of the chair made contact [with Crawford].” Dick himself elaborated on the altercation, telling Page Six that Crawford “body-slammed” his leg. “My femur got broken and my ankle got shattered and the tendons and ligaments on the other side are ripped off the bone,” he alleged.

 

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0.3
'Bitcoin King' Arrested in Alleged $300M Fraud Scheme After Reporting Hack

The Federal Police of Brazil announced on Monday they had arrested Cláudio Oliveira for his alleged involvement in a $300 million fraud scheme. Oliveira—the self-proclaimed "Bitcoin King"—is president of the Brazilian Bitcoin brokerage firm Bitcoin Banco Group, and he is accused of staging a cryptocurrency theft to embezzle money. Oliveira reported a bitcoin hack on his company in 2019, but Brazilian authorities believe the crime was a ruse. Oliveira's company reported 7,000 bitcoin had been stolen and client withdrawals from the group's brokers ceased. An investigation into the reported crime ensued, but while authorities looked into the crime, Bitcoin Banco Group received a favorable decision in its request for judicial recovery from the 1st Bankruptcy Court of Curitiba, according to a Monday press release from the Federal Police in Brazil. (A judicial recovery is a type of exemption that allows a corporate entity to pay creditors without filing for bankruptcy.) The alleged theft is now being called a fraud by police, and authorities are saying Bitcoin Banco Group embezzled R$1.5 billion ($300 million U. S.) from investors. More than 7,000 investors have reportedly been affected by the alleged Ponzi scheme, police said. Even after Bitcoin Banco Group received recovery funds, the company reportedly never explained the reason behind the supposed disappearance of the cryptocurrency to its clients. While the Bitcoin Banco still informed clients their Bitcoin was not taken, a lawyer working on behalf of Bitcoin Banco clients stated there were inconsistencies between the amounts expressed by the company and audited data. Federal Police began a three-year investigation into the company's actions during this time called Operation Daemon. The investigation involved around 90 federal police officers in Curitiba and the Metropolitan Region. Operation Daemon found that the Bitcoin Bank was running a private blockchain. When customers deposited funds, a system allegedly showed customers fake information that they were making gains. However, investigators found inconsistencies with the transactions. Federal Police later found there were not enough funds in the cryptocurrency accounts managed by the Bitcoin Bank to pay all its creditors. Operation Daemon also reportedly found that funds from Bitcoin Banco Group's clients were irregularly diverted to the personal accounts of Oliveira. Oliveira is now facing charges of embezzlement, money laundering, criminal organization, and crimes against the national financial system. When he was arrested, police also seized eight luxury cars and jewels. Oliveira's alleged scheme is not the first time he's run afoul of the law. Brazilian investigators reported he has allegedly committed crimes of the same nature in the United States and Switzerland.

 

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0.3
Drake Bell Confirms He Is Married And Has A Child Ahead of Court Sentencing

Drake Bell has announced he is married and has a son, just days before he is expected to be sentenced for felony attempted child endangerment and a misdemeanor charge of disseminating matter harmful to minors. The singer and former Nickelodeon star,35, has been embroiled in legal issues this year and pleaded guilty to the charges last month, after initially pleading not guilty. Sentencing is expected to take place on July 12 in Cleveland, Ohio. Taking to Twitter, Drake Bell, who also goes by Drake Campana, tweeted in Spanish that he has been married for almost three years and has also recently become a father. The tweet, translated to English, reads: "In response to various rumors that are incorrect, I have been married for almost three years, and we are blessed to be the parents of a wonderful son. Thank you very much to all my fans around the world for your good wishes." The couple have been dating since at least 2017, Page Six reports. The outlet also reports that Von Schmeling is listed as Bell's PR contact under the name Decibel Media Group. The company lists Bell as its sole client. Bell is to be sentenced for felony attempted child endangerment and a misdemeanor charge of disseminating matter harmful to minors next week. According to the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's Office, a 15-year-old female from Canada first reported Bell of the alleged offenses in 2018. Per, NBC News, Police in Cleveland have said that the then 15-year-old had "established a relationship with Bell several years prior and attended his concert in December 2017." A spokesperson for Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O'Malley added: "While there, Bell violated his duty of care and, in doing so, created a risk of harm to the victim." The charge of attempted child endangerment is confirmed to be related to the alleged concert incident. Meanwhile, the disseminating harmful material element is connected to Bell allegedly having sent the then 15-year-old girl "inappropriate social media messages." Drake's attorney told the Associated Press that his reasoning behind the guilty plea will be shared at his July 12 sentencing hearing. In 2020, an ex-girlfriend of Bell's, Melissa Lingafelt alleged that he was physically and verbally abusive towards her during their relationship. Bell has denied those claims. In November this year, Bell changed his name on Twitter to Drake Campana (campana means bell in Spanish) and has since appeared to carve out a career as a successful Spanish-language singer, based out of Mexico.

 

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0.6
Two Hong Kong students found guilty of rioting during 2019 campus protest

Two students charged in relation to a violent demonstration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) during the Vocational school student Cheung Chun-ho and CUHK student Tang Hei-man were convicted at the District Court on Wednesday after the judge rejected their defence they went to the front line of the protest either by mistake or out of curiosity. Two other co-defendants, CUHK student Chan Hey-hang and Polytechnic University student Lee Chun-ho, were acquitted of the charge of rioting due to a lack of evidence, but Chan was found guilty of violating the mask ban. The three found guilty were remanded in custody pending an array of assessments before sentencing on July 21. The four were the first group of defendants to stand trial over the unrest at CUHK on November 12,2019, one of the most violent episodes of the protest movement that year. They were accused of rioting in the vicinity of the No 2 bridge at the university’s Sha Tin campus, with all except Lee facing a further charge of wearing a facial covering at an unlawful assembly. The clashes followed a day of citywide protests which included demonstrators crippling operations along Tolo Highway and the nearby MTR East Rail Line by throwing objects from the bridge. Police dispersed protesters later that day and cordoned off the road to prevent further disruption. But protesters returned to the bridge the next morning, shining lasers at officers and shouting abuse from behind a makeshift barricade. Some participants also cursed at officers while hiding behind a bush. The illegal gathering escalated into a riot at around 3pm, when protesters hurled petrol bombs, bricks and miscellaneous items at officers retreating to the other side of the bridge. Police began arresting people 20 minutes later, apprehending the four defendants. Cheung, who studied at the Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education, testified he initially went to the area in the hopes of attending his elder sister’s graduation ceremony, not knowing the event had been called off due to the unrest. Read more Pair who took part in protest to break PolyU siege plead guilty to rioting Read more Top court to look into use of ‘joint enterprise’ rule for rioting cases Read more PolyU graduate first to be found guilty of rioting over 2019 clashes at campus He claimed he went to the bridge by mistake after following an unknown woman who gave him protective equipment commonly worn by radical protesters. Tang said she was there to find inspiration for her literary works, whereas the remaining two students declined to give evidence. In Wednesday’s verdict, Judge Clement Lee Hing-nin said the explanations offered by Cheung and Tang were excuses and stories created to evade criminal liabilities. He accepted the prosecutors’ conclusion that Cheung had actively taken part in the violence, while Tang abetted others to breach public order with her presence. However, he found no evidence to suggest how long Chan and Lee had remained on the scene, making it difficult to determine whether they had deliberately remained in the middle of the confrontation. Lee held that a police officer who arrested Lee did not tell the whole truth in court when the officer insisted the accused injured himself in the head even though video footage showed him being pulled down to the ground by police. The judge also cleared Cheung of weapons possession over a laser pointer by noting irregularities in police handling of the evidence. Rioting is punishable by seven years in prison at the District Court. The maximum penalty for breaching the government’s mask regulation is one year imprisonment and a fine of HK$25,000 (US$3,220). Recommended Video

 

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WATCH| The death of Ishmael Gama at the hands of Gauteng police

On 1 April 2020, Ishmael Gama was reportedly tortured and killed by police officers in Lenasia, Johannesburg. More than a year after his death, and months after the police watchdog implicated eight officers in murder, police management has not acted. But, this is not an unusual scenario. A new Viewfinder analysis of police brutality case data suggests that police management in Gauteng has entirely stopped disciplining officers implicated in killings and brutality in the province. Read the full story: Gauteng police have killed hundreds, but SAPS leaves brutal cops unchecked Do you want to know more about this topic? Sign up for one of News24's 33 newsletters to receive the information you want in your inbox. Special newsletters are available to subscribers.

 

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2.0
L. A. sees alarming spike in killings, shootings: 'Too many guns in too many hands'

A bloody Fourth of July weekend that left a dozen people dead across Los Angeles accelerated an already troubling increase in homicides and shootings in 2021, with some of the city’s poorest communities suffering the heaviest toll. Homicides are up 25% so far this year across Los Angeles, although the brunt of the increase has been felt in South Los Angeles, where killings have jumped 50% over the same time last year. Shootings citywide, meanwhile, have spiked by half this year. Police and community activists are bracing for tough months ahead as the summer traditionally brings with it a rise in bloodshed. Like with the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise in violence has not been spread evenly in Los Angeles. Watts, Westmont, downtown Los Angeles, Westlake and other largely poor neighborhoods have endured much of the upheaval, though there have been some exceptions. The Los Angeles Police Department’s Wilshire division had recorded no homicides this time last year. It now has at least 10. “Black and Latino communities are suffering,” said Najee Ali, a community activist. The worrisome trend is playing out in cities other than Los Angeles. After experiencing decades of historic declines in homicides, many big cities nationwide saw that crucial bellwether sharply reverse course in 2020 and have been helpless to stop the surge in killings in 2021. Last weekend, at least 189 people were killed in violent incidents across the U. S., according to gun violence archives that gather data from police and media reports. Los Angeles police officials say guns are fueling the rise here. The percentage of homicides that involved a firearm has climbed from 66% in 2019, to 70% last year and currently is running at about 75%, said Los Angeles Police Capt. Paul Vernon, who is soon to retire from his job tracking crime trends as head of the LAPD’s CompStat program. “There too many guns in too many hands,” said Capt. Stacy Spell, the department’s main spokesman who once oversaw its South Bureau Homicide Division. Officers are finding guns at significantly higher rates as well. As of last month, the department had seized 661 ghost guns — unregistered weapons that cannot be traced to an owner — compared to 813 in all of 2020. “At that rate, we could collect 1,500 ghost guns in a year,” Spell said. Spell echoed recent comments by LAPD Chief Michel Moore, who has argued the increased violence is inextricably linked to the pandemic. The lockdown restrictions imposed to slow the spread of the virus, Spell said, further eroded already fraying social safety nets and devastated families’ finances. Gang intervention workers, for example, were unable to break cycles of retaliation by visiting shooting victims or calming mourning family members in hospital emergency rooms. While gangs have undoubtedly played a role in the killings, police point as well to what they say is a newfound willingness to settle disputes with a gun that goes beyond any gang affiliation. Police say it’s impossible to know where the numbers are going. If the current pace of killings continues, L. A. would end the year with about 433 homicides — a sharp increase over the 254 killings recorded in 2019. Vernon cautioned, however, that 2020 — with 349 killings — was a very unusual year for homicides with a small increase in killings in the first half of the year, followed by a dramatic rise in the second. The volatility makes it difficult to project what might happen in the remaining months of 2021, he said. And while the ongoing rise is troubling, Spell noted the current numbers still pale in comparison to the early 1990s, when more than 1,000 killings in a year were common. Police also took some solace and hope in the fact that the spike in homicides has not been matched by a rise in other types of crime. Overall, violent crime is down slightly from 2020 and property crime is up only by a small amount. Violent crime arrests are down by nearly 10% compared to 2019 levels for the same period, while homicide arrests are up for that time by 60%. So far in 2021 the LAPD’s Southeast Division, which includes Watts, has seen the city’s largest increase in homicides —24 — compared with 10 during the same period last year. Violence over the last week cut short lives across the city. Ty Bray,18, a 2021 Venice High School graduate, was driving home with a friend in his restored 1979 Cadillac when shots rang out about 2:30 a.m Monday. Surveillance footage shows the Cadillac being chased by another car for several blocks. Police said the pursuer repeatedly fired into the car before Bray flipped it into the yard of a home on Rose Avenue. A passenger was taken to the hospital with multiple gunshot wounds, and Bray was pronounced dead at the scene Bray’s mother, Kena Evans, heard the gunshots outside her Venice apartment and, fearing the worst, called her son. “The [passenger] was the one who answered the phone,” Evans said. “She didn’t know where she was.” On Friday, Shalonda Madison was trying to get through to her sister on the phone. The two were supposed to be ironing out details for a memorial celebration for their mother, who had died of COVID-19. But calls to Fatima Johnson kept going to voicemail. The following day, Madison’s nieces contacted her asking whether she’d heard from their mother. They too were having trouble getting in touch with Johnson. They hadn’t heard from her in several days, and she hadn’t been to work or responded to their text messages. She was a no-show at her mother’s celebration of life that morning. By Saturday night, Johnson’s family was frantic. They went to her home in the 7600 block of South Western Avenue in South Los Angeles and made a gruesome discovery. “She was wrapped in a sheet, tied up,” Madison said. “Duct tape over her mouth, and she had wire around her hands. She was bound and hog-tied.” The coroner’s office has not yet determined the cause of death, but one of her daughters, Tyesa Harvey, said Johnson had been strangled. “What happened to my mother is something that no child should ever see of their parent,” Harvey said Tuesday. Johnson was a little more than a week away from celebrating her 54th birthday. The mother of six was studying to be a licensed vocational nurse at Westchester College of Nursing and Allied Health in Los Angeles. She was halfway through her program. A natural caregiver, Johnson worked at a retirement home in South L. A. while juggling classes, her niece Mia Daniels said. “I told her, ‘Aunty, you can’t work that much,’” Daniels said. "[But she said], ‘I like taking care of people. [It’s] not even work for me.’”

 

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2.4
Afghans Accused of Murdering Teen Had Years-Old Deportation Orders

Three of the four Afghan migrants suspected of raping and murdering a 13-year-old Austrian girl had their asylum claims declined. But due to appeal proceedings, they were not deported. Four Afghan asylum seekers are suspected of drugging, raping, and murdering 13-year-old Leonie in Vienna. Police arrested three suspects, aged 16,18, and 23, last week, while a fourth suspect, aged 22, remains at large and subject of a Europe-wide arrest warrant. The body of the teen was found on Saturday, June 26th. The three arrests were carried out a short time later, with the third migrant being apprehended on Thursday. The wanted 22-year-old has been on trial three times before his alleged involvement in the teen’s murder. He had been convicted of drug crimes and reported for drug trafficking, theft, and bodily injury. According to a report from Kronen Zeitung, the migrant came to Austria in 2015 as an unaccompanied minor and applied for asylum. His claim was rejected in 2017, and he was ordered to leave the country. Syrian Migrant Admits Murdering Austrian Teen Girl https://t.co/Ps364egFvL Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) January 15, 2019 The Afghan national, however, appealed the deportation order and, despite committing crimes in the following years, was not removed. The 18-year-old suspect has had his subsidiary protection revoked but appealed the decision in November 2019, and the case had yet to be resolved. Some have also questioned whether the Afghan is actually 18, with speculation in Autria’s establishment press that he may be as old as 30. The 23-year-old suspect is said to have also filed for asylum during the height of the migrant crisis in October 2015. He received a negative decision in February 2018, and the Austrian Federal Office for Immigration and Asylum (BFA) issued a deportation order. He also filed an appeal to the deportation order with the Federal Administrative Court in March 2018. Despite receiving a sentence of 24 months for bodily injury and sexual coercion in May 2020, he was also not deported. German Court Rejects Appeal by Iraqi Who Raped and Murdered Teen Girl https://t.co/5ZQucHVUWs — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) May 12, 2020 The Federal Administrative Court has not disputed large delays in processing failed asylum cases, claiming that in 2019,80 per cent of the procedures before the court,40,000 in total, were asylum claims. Meanwhile, police interrogated the 16-year-old suspect, who admitted that he had brought the 13-year-old victim to a friend’s apartment in the Vienna area of Donaustadt and claimed he and the teen had been given drinks spiked with drugs. He told police that he had passed out and not witnessed the sexual assault. The 13-year-old was later found dead, her body slumped against a tree near the area of the apartment where she had allegedly been raped and murdered.

 

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9.3
Watch: Silent protest against Stan Swamy’s death in Bandra, Mumbai

In Bandra, silent protestors seeking justice for Father Stan Swamy. Placards read ‘Narendra Modi, you have blood on your hands’ pic.twitter.com/hhg9q0Zdmt

 

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3.3
What Are Poppers? Risks, Side Effects Explained As FDA Reports Spike in Deaths

The U. S. Food and Drug Administration ( FDA) has warned people not to use alkyl nitrites drugs, commonly known as poppers, after it noticed a rise in deaths and hospitalizations. The agency warned the drugs are associated with "serious risks" including death. The reports the FDA received involved people suffering from severe headaches, dizziness, spikes in body temperature, breathing problems, extreme drops in blood pressure, issues with blood oxygen, and brain death after the drugs were inhaled or ingested. The advisory did not provide numbers on how many cases had been reported. Below is what you need to know about poppers and the FDA warning. "Poppers" is the slang name for alkyl nitrites. These drugs come in liquid form and are sold in 10 to 40 milliliter bottles that look like energy shots. They are commonly marketed as nail polish remover or cleaning products. They have been used to treat people suffering from chest pains caused by angina, with their name coming from the action of popping open glass capsules. People generally take poppers, which smell strongly of solvents, by sniffing them. They might do this straight out of the bottle, or douse absorbent material and sniff that. Although they are liquid, poppers aren't generally drunk as this causes the body to absorb chemicals faster, which can heighten the risk of taking them. Taking poppers increases blood flow, and can make a person feel euphoric, and give the sensation of a head-rush. The high generally lasts a few minutes. They can also boost sex drive, make skin more sensitive, and relax the anus and vagina, which is why some people take them before sex. For this reason, poppers are commonly associated with gay culture. While some say poppers can give them more intense erections and orgasms, it can have the opposite effect on others. Other common unwanted side-effects of poppers include feeling nauseous, becoming uncoordinated, nosebleeds, headaches, and chest pains. According to the FDA, poppers are sold online and in adult novelty stores, with names like "Jungle Juice," "Extreme Formula," "HardWare," "Quick Silver," "Super RUSH," "Super RUSH Nail Polish Remover" and "Premium Ironhorse.' On June 24, the FDA issued an advisory telling consumers not to buy or take poppers because they can cause serious adverse health effects, including death, when ingested or inhaled. It said nitrates should only be ingested or inhaled under the guidance of a health care professional. Those who own them should stop using them and throw them out. Anyone experiencing an illness after using the products should contact their health care provider immediately, the FDA said. Also contact your health care provider if you have used poppers are worried about your health. Following the spike in deaths and hospitalizations, the FDA said it would: "continue tracking reports of adverse events resulting from the ingestion or inhalation of nitrite 'poppers' and will take appropriate actions to protect the public health. The agency also has contacted its federal partners alerting them of the recent adverse event reports." Due to the nature of poppers being used before sex, people on Twitter poked fun at the advisory. However the risks are real. Dr. Gregory M. Taylor, assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, told Healthline some people who take poppers may not be aware of what they are or the possible risks, or confuse them with energy drinks. Taylor told Healthline: "If our patient [in the case study] hadn't come in until the next day, he may have already suffered brain damage and died." Diane Calello, executive and medical director of the New Jersey Poison Control Center at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, said that while poppers do not have known long-term side effects, "of course a cardiac arrest or other organ damage can leave a lasting mark." She said: "So don't take the chance. Consumers should just heed the warnings to immediately discontinue use."

 

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0.3
Former Michigan female prisoners settle sexual assault claims for $495,000

LANSING – Two women who were sexually assaulted by a storekeeper while incarcerated at Michigan’s only prison for women have settled their suit against state officials for $495,000, their attorney said. U. S. District Judge Laurie Michelson declared the 2018 lawsuit settled Tuesday. Michelson's order did not disclose the terms of the settlement. But Deborah Gordon, a Bloomfield Hills attorney who represented the two former prisoners, said the state has agreed to pay $495,000. Chris Gautz, a spokesman for the Michigan Department of Corrections, confirmed that amount. "Protecting female prisoners from assault by male employees requires a great deal of vigilance," Gordon said. "We hope that this case and outcome have raised awareness once again." Corrections Department officials admitted no wrongdoing. Norman Laughlin,55, of Milan, a storekeeper who worked in the warehouse at Women's Huron Valley Correctional Facility near Ypsilanti, was sentenced in September to 90 days in jail and five years of probation and required to register as a sex offender after he pleaded "no contest" to two counts of second-degree criminal sexual conduct. A defendant pleading no contest — which is treated like a guilty plea at sentencing — neither admits nor disputes the charges. Laughlin's 2020 conviction for offenses in 2016 and 2017 showed that sexual abuse continued at Women's Huron Valley even after the state in 2009 agreed to pay $100 million to settle lawsuits alleging systematic harassment and abuse by male corrections offices against female prisoners. More: Lawsuit: Sex abuse continued at Michigan women's prison after settlement More: 'We Lived It': Michigan prisoner hasn't seen mom in a year because of COVID-19 The lawsuit heard evidence that in addition to sharply restricting the use of male officers in the living areas of the prison, the state installed more than 1,400 cameras — far more than are in place at any other state prison — in the wake of the historic settlement. But the prison warehouse, where Laughlin worked and repeatedly abused and harassed female prisoners, had no cameras until 2016, after which it had only four cameras and many blind spots, according to evidence in the case. Laughlin, who was not involved in the abuse that led to the 2009 settlement, groped women's breasts and genital areas, invited them to masturbate, slapped their butts, exposed himself and made offensive sexual comments, according to evidence in the case. Female prisoners called him by his first name and he ate lunch with the prisoners and was friends with prisoners and former prisoners on Facebook. The most recent reported abuse was in January 2018, when one of the women testified Laughlin tweaked her nipple and exposed himself to her. The Free Press has documented a litany of problems at the women's prison, including overcrowding, leaky roofs and a scabies outbreak that raged through the prison for about a year before prison officials properly diagnosed and treated it. Michelson ruled in February that the two women Laughlin was convicted of sexually assaulting could proceed with their lawsuit against him and three supervisors. A reasonable jury could find that Toni Moore, the prison business manager who supervised the warehouse and other areas, and former wardens Anthony Stewart and Shawn Brewer "were deliberately indifferent to a substantial risk that Laughlin was sexually abusing female prisoners," Michelson wrote in a 46-page opinion. Michelson dismissed claims against former Gov. Rick Snyder, department Director Heidi Washington and four other MDOC officials who she found were not in a position to know about Laughlin's abuse. Laughlin joined the department in 2000 and worked at the women's prison from 2009 until January 2018, when he was suspended. Laughlin was fired in August 2018, according to evidence in the case. Neither woman reported the abuse to anyone at the Corrections Department while they were prisoners. They were released in 2018 and 2019. But Michelson found that some prison officials had evidence on which they could have acted sooner. Contact Paul Egan: 517-372-8660 or pegan@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @paulegan4. Read more on Michigan politics and sign up for our elections newsletter. Become a subscriber.

 

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0.2
Australia Shows The Most Humane Border Policy Is Enforcing The Laws

Vice President and in-name-only border czar Kamala Harris finally scurried down to El Paso, Texas two weeks ago. After months of dodging and trivializing the issue, Harris’s eventual visit failed to address the crowded and unsanitary correctional facilities, the influx of migrants in border towns like Del Rio, the regular migrant drownings and rescues in the Rio Grande, and widespread reports of trespassing, damage, and theft on riverfront ranches and properties in Val Verde and Kinney counties. Biden promised a more humane approach to immigration. Yet there is nothing humane about yielding border control to criminal cartels who traffic and abandon toddlers and brutally rape unaccompanied children and women. Thanks to Biden’s encouragement, the surge in migrants rushing to the border — with cartels enjoying a monopoly on illegal crossings — has escalated an already bad system that exploits the most vulnerable. It’s also not compassionate to ignore the surge in smuggling of fentanyl, a narcotic responsible for the deaths of around 36,000 Americans in 2019 alone. So far in 2021, U. S. Customs and Border Protection have seized as much fentanyl as in 2019 and 2020 combined. The Texas Department of Public Safety reported an 800 percent increase in the quantity of fentanyl apprehended at the border in the first four months of the year compared with the same period last year, enough fentanyl to kill 21 million people. Ordinary Americans understand what elites pretend not to: a serious country can’t lose control of its borders. Australia’s two-decade border security journey tells an instructive story of political leaders who grasped this fundamental point, and those who didn’t. Australia’s tough stance has signaled a defense of territorial sovereignty, a refusal to outsource immigration control to human trafficking networks, and an understanding that public support for controlled migration hinges on strong borders. In 2001, amidst surging unauthorized maritime arrivals, Australian Prime Minister John Howard launched a package of legislative changes and strict border control policies called the Pacific Solution to curb illegal boat arrivals and human trafficking. These changes excised islands around Australia from the migration zone, deployed the Royal Australian Navy and customs officials to turn back boats, and processed asylum seekers in mandatory offshore detention centers on Nauru and Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island. The catalyst was the Norwegian freighter Tampa’s attempt to unlawfully enter Australian territorial waters and drop off hundreds of illegal, mostly Afghan migrants rescued at sea. Howard found the violation unwarranted, and the justification exaggerated. Special forces were dispatched to board the Tampa and prevent it from sailing any closer to Australian territory. Howard’s insistence that a government must control “who comes to this country and the circumstances in which they come” received resounding public support across middle Australia. Howard maintained his actions weren’t just about public opinion, but also about defending the national interest. While Australia’s border policies have been targets of controversy — owing largely to reports of abuse in offshore detention centers and concerns about the lengthy detention of children — the numbers indicate discouraging human traffickers has been effective in stopping the boats. The number of illegal boats plummeted from dozens of vessels with thousands of passengers arriving each year to precisely one vessel carrying a single person in 2002. When the subsequent Labor government began reversing those policies in 2008, human traffickers came back and illegal boat arrivals surged. Five years of left-wing incompetence and handwringing resulted in the arrival of more than 50,000 migrants in unauthorized boats and the deaths of more than 1,100 migrants at sea. Within 18 months of the implementation of Howard’s Pacific Solution, the share of asylum applicants who arrived illegally by boat (instead of by air) had dropped sharply from 24 percent to 1 percent. Under successive Labor governments, that number skyrocketed to 68 percent by 2013. When Tony Abbott was elected prime minister in 2013, his center-right coalition reinstated many Howard-era policies. Under successive prime ministers since then, the Australian government has maintained its tough stance. Illegal boat arrivals fell to zero between 2015 and 2016, and the drownings have ended. In 2016, after the 28th illegal boat in a matter of months had been turned away,Prime Minister Malcolm Turnball noted the only thing stopping the relentless human trafficking networks was the “steely resolve” of the government “to turn those boats back.” During the 2015 European migrant crisis, when a boat carrying illegal migrants from Libya capsized in the Mediterranean and killed hundreds of people, Abbott insisted “the only way to stop the deaths is to stop the people-smuggling trade.” In a 2019 address, Abbott spoke about the lessons Australia could teach Europe about border protection. While civilians threatened by war and refugees in immediate fear of their lives should undoubtedly be able to claim sanctuary, he reasoned, “being poor and being able to benefit from life in a rich country confers no right of entry.” Migrants seeking a better life in another country should be treated with compassion, not blame. Still, a government has a duty to its citizens to maintain strict border control. Unconditionally welcoming anyone who can make the journey is unsustainable, straining economic vitality and social cohesion. Abbott speculated those supporting open borders must be conscious of or at least indifferent to the impact of uncontrolled migration. “You can’t will the cause without also willing the effect,” he said. International commentators have scolded Australia for its asylum policies, accusing Australia of dodging its responsibilities. Yet Australia proudly remains a country of migrants and “a champion of refugee settlement.” It has welcomed more than 7.5 million immigrants since 1945 and resettled half a million refugees since 1980. There are currently more than 7 million migrants living in Australia, and 30 percent of the total Australian population was born overseas. Maj. Gen. Jim Molan, the architect of Australia’s border protection policies under Abbott, insisted in 2017 that the country’s entire migration program would lose the confidence of the Australian people if the government were to relinquish border control to “people smugglers.” Like their Australian counterparts, ordinary Americans are not bereft of common sense. Despite Democrats and their media enablers ignoring, denying, and passing the buck on the issue, Americans understand radical rhetoric and policies are to blame for their border crisis, and have little confidence in the Biden regime’s control of the situation. Harris didn’t need to go to Guatemala and Mexico to investigate the “root causes” of this disaster. She had only to consider the impact of halting border wall construction, reinstating catch and release, ending the “Remain in Mexico Program” (which required potential asylum seekers to stay in Mexico while awaiting the outcome of their cases), restricting the enforcement of illegal immigration, and reportedly even canceling Operation Talon, a nationwide program set up in the final weeks of Trump’s presidency that prioritized deporting sex offenders who were in the country illegally. You can’t solve the border crisis by magically removing economic hardships, violence, corruption, food insecurity, and changing climates, although these are important considerations. Instead, as the Australian experience highlights, the pivotal issue is government resolve to control illegal border crossings and commitment to enforcing immigration laws. As Abbott put it, a strict border policy is “the truly compassionate thing to do,” necessary to save lives and preserve nations.

 

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1.3
Steidler: Recovering from Washington’s fumble on opioid epidemic

With opioid deaths rising 29% during the pandemic, killing more than 55,000 Americans annually, Washington must do more to save lives. It can start by enforcing the Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention Act (STOP Act) so criminal cartels are deterred from shipping illegal opioids to America via the international postal system. Through the leadership of Ohio’s Sen. Rob Portman, the STOP ACT gained broad bipartisan support and became law in October 2018. It requires advanced electronic data, information about the shipper, contents and other tracking information, on all packages sent through the international postal system coming into the United States. With AED, suspicious packages are more efficiently identified and seized. The absence of AED requirements on postal shipments led Chinese criminal enterprises to advertise on the Internet that they preferred to ship drugs using the international postal system. An investigative January 2018 bipartisan Senate report documented this. AED technology is well-established. It has been required by law on private-sector shipping companies since 2002. The STOP Act required AED on all packages from China by Jan.1,2019, and all other countries by Jan.1,2021. Otherwise, the packages are to be rejected and not delivered. None of this has happened and millions of packages a month without AED are still being delivered throughout America. U. S. Customs and Border Protection is the law enforcement agency that must turn this around quickly. CBP was required to issue final regulations by Oct.24,2019. It did not issue interim regulations until March 15, 2021. Fortunately, the regulations are under review and can be tightened in the coming weeks. Here are the top five things that must be fixed. Packages without AED must not be accepted or delivered. At a Dec.10 U. S. Senate hearing, senators clearly expected this would happen with vigor. “The law is clear. As of January 1,2021, the Postal Service must start refusing packages without advanced electronic data. According to a briefing our staff received this week, this could mean 130,000 mail pieces a day, or about 4 million every month,” said Sen. Tom Carper. Yet, the CBP regulations barely mention the non-delivery of packages without AED. Spend what it takes — and charge the foreign shippers. One reason for the non-confiscation of packages is that confiscation will be expensive. CPB plans to spend just $11.3 million on this law enforcement effort when tens of millions of packages without AED continue to enter America annually. To fix this, CBP should warehouse and return all packages without AED, and charge foreign shippers $1 a package for this cost. It has the legal authority to do this. Address the China question directly. Three-quarters of the approximately 500 million overseas packages that the U. S. receives annually come from China. While most Chinese packages have AED, approximately 10% do not. There is no reason China’s postal service, China Post, can not immediately require all AED on outbound packages to the U. S. as it has been required to do since Jan.1,2019. CBP’s strictest measure should be on packages from China. End exemptions for all countries. While all countries were given nearly two-and-a-half years notice to provide AED, CBP is considering waivers to more than 100 countries. Waivers should be rare, and none for more than six months. Otherwise, criminal cartels from China can easily send fentanyl and other illegal opioids to smaller countries where they will be re-packaged and sent to America. Report on compliance and enforcement. There are no reporting requirements in the regulations. CBP should provide quarterly reports to Congress and the public that include the number of packages entering the U. S. with AED, the percent searched, and how often opioids and other illegal products were found. Congress should immediately demand these common-sense changes with the same determination, bipartisan cooperation and enthusiasm that accompanies the 2018 implementation of the STOP Act. Paul Steidler is a senior fellow with the Lexington Institute. InsideSources

 

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6.9
Critic’s Death Puts Focus on Palestinian Authority’s Authoritarianism

Hundreds of Palestinians massed in central Ramallah’s Clock Tower Square one night in late June to protest the Palestinian Authority’s brutality after an anti-corruption activist died in its custody. The activist, Nizar Banat, was seized in a wave of arrests and, his family said, Palestinian security officers had beaten him to death. The protest was peaceful until a group of pro-government cadres from the ruling Fatah party descended on it. Reporters for The New York Times saw them charge at protesters, including young women and boys, throw stones at them, beat them with clubs, flagpoles and fists, and snatch cellphones from people suspected of documenting the events. The unrest over Mr. Banat, whose death at the hands of Palestinian officials has been compared to the killing of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi, has drawn fresh attention to what critics describe as the increasingly autocratic rule of Mahmoud Abbas, the authority’s octogenarian president, and its ever more blatant clampdown on any semblance of democratic process, freedom of expression, judicial independence and nongovernmental organizations. “They are not hiding it anymore,” said Wissam Husseini,29, a Palestinian yoga and meditation teacher who said he had been beaten and pepper-sprayed. “This is a second occupation actually, not really a government.” Mr. Husseini, like many, was convinced that the assailants had been plainclothes Palestinian security officials. He described the Palestinian Authority as a corrupt “dictatorial group.” The protests, which have spread to West Bank cities including Bethlehem and Hebron, come at a perilous time for Mr. Abbas. His already dwindling popularity has plummeted since April when he canceled what would have been the first parliamentary and presidential elections in the occupied territories in over 15 years. He took another blow in May when the Palestinian Authority’s main rival, Hamas, the Islamic militant group that controls Gaza, launched rockets against Israel, casting itself as the defender of Jerusalem and asserting its leadership of the Palestinian cause. The ensuing war was followed by the arrests of dozens of critics of the authority across the West Bank. During one recent protest, demonstrators marched toward Mr. Abbas’s headquarters in Ramallah chanting “The people want the fall of the regime,” the refrain that helped topple dictators in the Arab Spring. When Mr. Abbas feels threatened, his “tolerance for dissent becomes less and less,” said Khalil Shikaki, director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research, a polling organization in Ramallah. “We are not yet Hafez al-Assad’s Syria or Saddam Hussein’s Iraq,” he said, referring to notorious dictatorships. “But from the separation of powers to free speech to a pluralistic society, all of this has come under attack.” The Palestinian Authority, which exercises limited self-rule in parts of the West Bank, was never meant to be a permanent government. Created in 1994, it was intended to last up to five years, by which time Israel and the Palestinians were supposed to have agreed on a final peace accord. Peace talks have since stalled but the authority, supported by Europe and the United States, has carried on. Palestinians have been torn in the past between protesting against the authority and Israel, which militarily occupies the territory. But the death of Mr. Banat and the harsh suppression of the protests that followed have reinforced a broadening sense among some Palestinians that the authority has become little more than a convenient subcontractor for the occupation. Mr. Banat,42, was a house painter whose online broadsides against the authority had gained a substantial following. Family members said that Palestinian security officers burst into the Hebron home where Mr. Banat was staying on June 24, beat him viciously and dragged him away. A Palestinian official initially said that Mr. Banat’s health had “deteriorated” during his arrest, and Justice Minister Muhammad al-Shlaldeh said last Wednesday that Mr. Banat had suffered an “unnatural” death. European and other diplomats who met with Majed Faraj, the Palestinian General Intelligence chief, last Wednesday said they had been told Mr. Banat’s killing was an accident. The uproar over the killing eerily echoed the 2018 death of Mr. Khashoggi, an outspoken Saudi columnist whose criticisms of Saudi Arabia had angered its crown prince. A Saudi hit squad killed Mr. Khashoggi and the kingdom sought unsuccessfully to cover it up. Gen. Talal Dweikat, the spokesman for Palestinian security forces, said Friday that 14 people had been referred to the military justice system and that investigations into Mr. Banat’s death would continue. Reports of arbitrary arrest and torture by the authority have been rife for years, and Mr. Banat was not the first to die. After a Hamas supporter, Haitham Amro, died in the custody of the General Intelligence Service in 2009, an autopsy determined torture was the cause. Five intelligence officers were charged but a military court acquitted them. The courts too have been severely weakened by Mr. Abbas, who, surrounded by a coterie of aides, has been ruling by decree since 2007, when he dissolved the Palestinian legislature after Hamas’s victory in general elections and its subsequent takeover of Gaza. Decrees over the last two years have enabled Mr. Abbas’s office to wield more influence over the courts, according to Palestinian legal professionals. Several noncompliant judges have been fired. Ahmad al-Ashqar, a constitutional law professor and lawyer who had served as a judge since 2011, was forcibly retired by Mr. Abbas in January, he said, after he had openly opposed the president’s appointment of a transitional judicial council to replace the previous council, a high-level body that supervises the judiciary. “Today there is no independent court, as an institution,” he said. “The judges are afraid of having what happened to me happen to them.” The authority has also clamped down on nongovernment groups, requiring them to submit their plans for research and activities and their estimated budgets. And an electronic crimes law from 2018 has been used to undermine freedom of speech and information, human rights advocates say. It allows the authority to block websites that could “threaten national security, public order or public morals,” and has been used to shut sites of political opponents. Mr. Shikaki, the pollster, said his group had found it increasingly difficult to publish results in the Palestinian news media. When he refused to comply with the new regulations, he said, the group’s bank accounts were frozen. A June poll by his group found that 84 percent of Palestinians believe the authority is tainted with corruption, and many complain about mismanagement and nepotism. In one example, Muatasem Muhaisen, the son of a top official of Mr. Abbas’s Fatah party, was appointed to a senior Health Ministry position even after he had been accused of assaulting a Ramallah hospital director. In March, the authority siphoned some of the few Covid vaccines in its possession and distributed them to the senior ranks of the ruling party, allies in the media and even relatives of top dignitaries, according to Palestinian officials. Some Palestinians said the authority, working from an old Middle East playbook framed around security, was confronting a new, educated and social media-savvy generation of Palestinians. “Today is not the 1980s or 90s,” said Shawan Jabarin, director of Al Haq, a Palestinian human rights organization. “With the new media, you cannot hide your actions.” The United States, which has financed, trained and equipped the Palestinian security forces over the years, said it was “deeply disturbed” by Mr. Banat’s death, adding in a statement, “We have serious concerns about Palestinian Authority restrictions on the exercise of freedom of expression by Palestinians and harassment of civil society activists and organizations.” American security assistance, severed during the Trump administration, was resumed in April. A U. S. Embassy spokeswoman said the aid was intended “to assist in the development of credible institutions of governance” and strengthen Israeli-Palestinian security cooperation. The anti-authority protests, which have extended into this week, have put pressure on Mr. Abbas to respond to the death of Mr. Banat but few Palestinians expect any major imminent changes. “What they did over the last days has scared people and intimidated them,” said Shatha Hammad,32, a Palestinian journalist for the news site Middle East Eye who was injured and had her cellphone smashed in a protest. General Dweikat, the security forces spokesman, denied that any plainclothes officers had attacked protesters, insisting that the assailants were just civilian counterprotesters who had feared “a huge assault on the political system.” He denied knowledge of cellphone confiscations or arrests over Facebook postings. “Our position is that we don’t arrest anyone for their speech,” he said. A young Palestinian builder who recently spent 10 days in a Palestinian jail in Jericho disagreed. He said he had been arrested over an oblique insult aimed at the authority that he had posted on Facebook. Speaking on the condition of anonymity for fear of retribution, he said he had been roughed up and humiliated during daily interrogations. All he wants, he said, were elections and the ability to speak freely. As a teenager, the builder said, he had spent 30 months in Israeli prisons for throwing stones at soldiers. “They have rules,” he said of the Israelis. “There’s a law, a system. There’s no law in the authority.”

 

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0.9
McDonald's Customers Pull Gun on Manager Over Dispute About Salt on Fries

Two people have been arrested in Texas on suspicion of pulling a gun on a manager of a McDonald's restaurant during a dispute about salt on their fries. Davion Guillory,23, and Treykia Cohen,25, have been charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, following an incident which occurred at the McDonald's restaurant located in the 128 block of E. Richey Road in Harris County on July 4. The Harris County Precinct 4 Constable's Office said in a statement that deputies were flagged down at the McDonald's in order to respond to reports of an aggravated assault. An investigation found that Guillory and Cohen entered into an argument with the manager at the restaurant over salt on their fries. Surveillance footage showed that the pair also displayed firearms at the drive-thru towards the manager during the verbal altercation. The pair then drove off, but deputies were able to locate the car and detain them. A firearm was also found inside the vehicle. Constable Mark Herman said that further investigations revealed that Cohen was already out on probation for aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon at the time of the incident. "Davion Guillory and Treykia Cohen were arrested and booked into the Harris County Jail, charged with Aggravated Assault with a Deadly Weapon. They each received a $10,000.00 bond out of the 178th and 180th District Court," Herman added. McDonald's has been contacted for comment. There have been a number of incidents recently in which suspects allegedly threatened or attacked staff at McDonald's restaurants over minor disputes. In June, Robert Golwitzer Jr.,42, was arrested after allegedly threatening to blow up a branch in Ankeny, Iowa, because they did not give him dipping sauce to go with his chicken nuggets. Golwitzer was arrested on suspicion of false report of explosive or incendiary device, after ringing up the restaurant to make the bomb threat on June 26. The same month, a woman was arrested on suspicion of assaulting two McDonald's staff members because they refused to give her a slushie consisting of three different flavors. A clip of Cherysse Helena Cleveland getting into a physical altercation with two female staff members went viral after it was posted online by Brian Allen on June 14. Cleveland is seen behind the counter attempting to make her own slushie before punching the manager in the head and telling her to "get the f*** out, b***." When another staff member said that she is going to call the police, Cleveland says: "Go ahead, I don't give a f***," adding "I will go to f****** prison." Cleveland was arrested and charged with two counts of misdemeanor assault.

 

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0.9
Mexican YouTuber arrested on child pornography charges

A controversial YouTuber was detained on charges of child pornography in Mexico City after showing video of a sexual assault to her millions of followers, reports said. Yoseline Hoffman, known on the video platform as “YosStop,” was ordered by a judge to be held without bail on charges she used video of the 2018 gang rape to shame the victim and spawn an ugly campaign of harassment, according to EL PAÍS. Hoffman,30, displayed the footage on a phone during a YouTube video and tried to pin the blame on the victim, the report said. “That woman let them stick a bottle of Moët in her vagina for three packs of cigarettes. Then this woman got all popular for being such a sl–,” she said in a video that was later deleted. The victim, Ainara Suárez, filed a complaint in March against four men for a gang rape when she was 16 years old in 2018. She also claimed the men, along with Hoffman and a friend, had video of the attack. After Hoffman discussed the assault and denigrateed Suárez on YouTube, the video began appearing on pornography websites. Suárez — who needed to receive therapy in an effort to overcome the ordeal — claims she has been the target of a harassment campaign as a result of Hoffman’s video. A lawyer for Suárez said it’s clear that her actions constitute a crime. “The mere fact that she stored or played that content constitutes a child pornography offense. And she herself shows the camera the screen of her cellphone with the video of the rape on it,” the lawyer told EL PAÍS. The YouTube star addressed the controversy in a message on social media. “They have tried to involve me in an offense that I never committed,” she said. “But I fully trust in the truth and in common sense. As I have said in many of my videos, allegations should serve as a tool of citizen empowerment. Unfortunately, I find myself involved in an issue that has nothing to do with me. But I hope that everything is cleared up and resolved soon.” Hoffman, the only suspect arrested in connection with the attack, is facing 14 years in jail if convicted.

 

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0.4
Legal gray area allows opening of cannabis-friendly campground in Harrison

HARRISON — Trinity Madison sits at the picnic table at her campground’s common area, her mouth pressed to a bong. She lifts her head, breathes out a plume of smoke, and laughs. It’s 4:20 p.m., and for Madison, it’s just another day at the office. Madison is the owner of Camp Laughing Grass, a newly opened, cannabis-friendly campground in Harrison for those 21 and older that offers traditional campsites, cabins and “glamping” tents. Her campground is one of what some expect will be several non-cannabis businesses taking advantage of Vacationland’s long-awaited legal cannabis market opening last fall. Still, regulators say aspiring business owners should tread lightly in what is a “murky” and untested portion of the state’s legal cannabis law. Camp Laughing Grass is, for all intents and purposes, “Not that different than a KOA (Kampgrounds of America),” Madison said, with the exception that “when we find you smoking weed, we’re not going to kick you out.” That, plus the nods to cannabis sprinkled throughout the décor, such as the hemp soaps in the shape of marijuana leaves on the beds, or the sign in the common area that says “coffee sips and bong rips,” the smoking pieces available for sale and the volcano vaporizer that gets turned on at the same time as the coffee pot in the morning. Camp Laughing Grass boasts 10 campsites, though Madison hopes to expand that to 20 by next year, including the addition of some teepees. The camp is BYOB – bring your own bud – and smoking cannabis is encouraged. Drinking alcohol is discouraged, and smoking tobacco is prohibited. Guests have access to the Crooked River for kayaking, floating and swimming. The common area has picnic tables, a fire pit, s’mores kits for purchase and plenty of board games, including Ganjaland, the cannabis-lover’s take on Candy Land, and a game called “Puff Puff Pass: the Card Game for Stoners.” Campers run the gamut from “Trumpers to dirty hippies,” Madison said, and everyone just likes to “hang out and smoke.” “Weed brings people together,” she added. April Rollins is inclined to agree. She credits the camp with saving her marriage. “My husband and I were having a hard time,” she said. “We’ve been married for 16 years, (and) we hit a lull. We figured a vacation would be good for us.” The couple heard about the camp from a friend and decided to check it out. Rollins’ husband isn’t ordinarily a marijuana smoker, but she said they had so much fun on their trip that it brought them back together. Now, Rollins works at the camp as the hospitality and housekeeping manager. Aside from the help with her marriage, Rollins said she’s also grateful for the camp’s “come as you are” acceptance. CAMPING ON THE EDGE “A lot of places don’t let you medicate. I need it to function,” she said of cannabis. “Here, nobody’s looking at me funny. There’s no judgment. There’s a community that happens here.” Camp Laughing Grass is only permitted to operate as a cannabis-friendly campground through a legal loophole. Since Madison isn’t selling cannabis or operating an adult-use or medical cannabis storefront, the camp doesn’t fall under the Maine Office of Marijuana Policy’s jurisdiction. Marijuana “social clubs,” sites licensed to sell retail marijuana to be consumed onsite as bars do with alcohol, are not legal in Maine despite originally being approved in the 2016 referendum that legalized recreational cannabis. Under state statute, consumption is permitted only in a private residence or on private property “not generally accessible by the public” and with explicit permission to consume marijuana on the property. Because of this, Madison was unable to register the camp as a public campground. Instead, the groundskeeper moved onsite, making the camp a private residence. She rents out the sites through Airbnb and makes it clear that she is not selling marijuana to the guests, nor does the cost of a site include any free product. According to David Heidrich, spokesman for the Office of Marijuana Policy, Madison could technically offer free marijuana to the guests because of the camp’s status as a private residence, but by charging for a site it gets “murky.” He advised any businesses to “tread lightly” when it comes to becoming cannabis-friendly and to consult legal counsel before making decisions. There are still a lot of “unanswered questions” when it comes to the law, he said, because it’s “simply an untested area.” For her part, Madison hopes that one day the rules in the state will allow her to operate “without the loopholes” – she’d be happy to pay the additional taxes to run a fully permitted commercial property. “Cannabis vacationing is a thing, so just give us a way to do it legally,” she said. “This isn’t going away.” It’s unclear whether there are any other campgrounds like Camp Laughing Grass, though Madison said she’s not offering the only cannabis-friendly lodging in the state. Until last year, when the pandemic forced owners to put an indefinite pause on things, Maine Greenyards operated a “bud and breakfast” – a bed-and-breakfast that serves marijuana, in Auburn. In Dexter, Cannacation offers rooms for vacationers seeking infused dinners and like-minded patrons. Madison’s dreams for the camp extend beyond the additional 10 sites and teepees she hopes to put in. Winterizing the space may be in the cards, or perhaps expanding more – the next-door neighbor has expressed interest in selling some of his land. Madison ultimately hopes to turn Camp Laughing Grass into a sort of adult summer camp, offering drama classes and crafts. But it’s not that easy. Cannabis-focused businesses often have trouble securing a bank account, let alone any type of business loan. “There’s no money in this industry,” Madison said, so she’s left with no choice other than to “save money and pay in cash.” Despite this, she has always wanted to work in cannabis. A self-described “rebel child,” Madison was just a “kid who loved smoking weed who refused to get a job where I could be drug tested.” For years, her dream was to open a cannabis café or her own bud-and-breakfast. That dream seemed within reach just a few years ago. In 2017, Madison was poised to open the Laughing Grass Inn as a sort of three-week pop-up hotel at the Cornish Inn, a longtime hotel in the town’s historic district. The idea was that guests would receive complimentary edibles, a “wake-and-bake bowl” and a 420 happy hour with both edibles and a bud bar, all at no charge. But Cornish had imposed a 180-day moratorium on recreational marijuana, and just days before she was set to open, residents voted to prohibit all forms of adult-use cannabis. Madison was ordered by a code enforcement officer not to proceed. She said it was hard “living in a town where everyone knew me as the girl with the devil’s lettuce,” so she retreated to Florida for two years. Madison returned in 2019 when she saw the property in Harrison for sale. Chris McCabe, a Maine attorney focused on cannabis law and policy and co-founder of the National Cannabis Bar Association, believes there’s ample room for more businesses to become cannabis-friendly – and that they should try to do so. The state has a relatively low barrier to entry for license holders, he said, and there’s a “huge market” for it. “I personally love the idea of catering toward this,” McCabe said. “It would open up more tourism opportunities.” The absence of permitted social clubs seriously restricts options for any of Maine’s millions of tourists who might wish to explore the state’s newly launched legal market, especially since most hotels ban smoking inside rooms. Club advocates have said pot lounges would give tourists a legal place to use the cannabis they buy in Maine and keep it out of public parks and beaches. But opponents say club patrons must eventually leave, increasing the risk of impaired driving. When Maine first legalized adult-use marijuana, the social clubs or smoking lounges were largely uncharted territory. But now, states including Massachusetts, Colorado and Nevada are either permitting or exploring the possibility of permitting such businesses. McCabe is optimistic that Maine will revisit social clubs within the next few years. They are still “novel” in the cannabis world, he said, and represent just another way that Maine can be a leader in the industry, something he believes the state should put more money and effort into promoting. “It could be absolutely huge,” he said. “We should spend time to find ways to do something that’s innovative and new.… It’s bringing tourists and jobs.” However, he noted that in order to do that, legislators also need to “write some clarity” into the law in terms of what’s allowed and what’s not allowed for businesses, something that’s currently lacking because the law is so “young.” Madison is already seeing her business attract tourism to the state. She bought the 17-acre property in December 2019 and, after sprucing it up, listed the campsites on Airbnb last summer. Her sites have been booking quickly again this year, and Madison’s phone still hasn’t stopped ringing. “The No.1 thing I hear (when I answer) is, ‘Finally, finally, there’s something like this open,'” she said. “People are stoked. People travel from all over.” Success. Please wait for the page to reload. If the page does not reload within 5 seconds, please refresh the page. Enter your email and password to access comments. Forgot Password? Don't have a Talk profile? Create one. Invalid username/password. Please check your email to confirm and complete your registration. Create a commenting profile by providing an email address, password and display name. You will receive an email to complete the registration. Please note the display name will appear on screen when you participate. Already registered? Log in to join the discussion. Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or login to participate in the conversation. Here’s why. 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Total 113 articles.
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Created at 2021-07-08 06:19