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DC5m United States art in english 100 articles, created at 2016-10-08 16:11
(25.99/26)  1  Trump apologizes for his crude remarks in 2005 video

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump apologized early Saturday for vulgar language he used about groping and kissing women in a 2005 video whose release has rocked his campaign. 2016-10-08 08:20 2KB www.timeslive.co.za

(17.99/26)  2  LIVE | Hurricane Matthew Interactive Coverage

As Hurricane Matthew continues to make its way to the Georgia coastline, 11Alive will be live with you through the storm. Our continuous live coverage will be answering your questions and taking you with us behind the scenes as we cover Hurricane Matthew from Atlanta and across the southeast. 2016-10-08 06:51 1KB rssfeeds.11alive.com

(14.99/26)  3  Fallout continues for Donald Trump in wake of lewd recorded comments about women

Campaign 2016 updates - Fallout continues for Donald Trump in wake of lewd recorded comments about women Oct. 8, 2016, 3:10 a.m. As support slips, Donald Trump apologizes for lewd comments about womenIn an audio recording, Trump is heard making lewd comments about womenHere is Trump's video apology... 2016-10-08 06:10 1KB www.latimes.com

(7.99/26)  4  Two suspects blow themselves up during Ankara police operation

Two suicide bombers detonated their explosives during a police operation in the Turkish capital Ankara on Saturday after officers called on the suspects to surrender, state media reported. 2016-10-08 02:00 2KB www.digitaljournal.com

(5.79/26)  5  Hillary Clinton-Donald Trump Debate: The Objectives Of Each Candidate

For the second US presidential debate, Sunday night in St Louis, the pressure is squarely on Donald Trump, who needs a moment of political magic to reverse his slide in polls barely four weeks from... 2016-10-08 04:13 807Bytes article.wn.com

(3.41/26)  6  Japan's Mount Aso volcano erupts and blankets cities in ash in Kyushu

A volcano has burst into life in southwestern Japan's Mount Aso, spewing clouds of volcanic ash over entire towns as far as 250 kilometres away from the popular tourist attraction. 2016-10-08 08:23 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(3.29/26)  7  A look at the 1st 100 days of Duterte's phenomenal rule

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — In just 100 days in office, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has stirred a hornet's nest by picking a fight with Barack Obama, the United Nations, the European Union and others who have criticized his brutal crackdown... 2016-10-08 06:25 859Bytes article.wn.com

(3.12/26)  8  Wikileaks release transcripts of Hillary Clinton's closed-doors Wall Street speeches

Wikileaks on Friday published emails from campaign chairman John Podesta. One of them, sent by campaign research director Tony Carrk, points out 'flags' in Hillary Clinton's paid speeches. 2016-10-08 00:04 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(2.65/26)  9  3 big questions Donald Trump will have to answer about this lewd video

Yes, this is likely to come up at Sunday's debate. 2016-10-08 03:52 4KB www.washingtonpost.com

(2.38/26)  10  The 'p-word' problem: Trump's comments pose issue for news outlets

Audio of a lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Billy Bush present a problem for headline writers. 2016-10-08 08:03 2KB rss.cnn.com

(2.18/26)  11  'We have to persevere': Colombian president hopes Nobel Prize can help push peace process

A roller-coaster fortnight for Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos — who signed a historic agreement to end a half-century-old guerrilla war only to see it rejected by voters — ended in euphoria Friday when he was awarded the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. John Otis looks at... 2016-10-08 08:32 992Bytes article.wn.com

(2.06/26)  12  Copycat: Threatening clowns seen in UK, following US trend

LONDON (AP) — British police have warned about people in clown outfits acting suspiciously and sometimes wielding knives as they follow people. The warning S... 2016-10-08 08:35 1KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(2.06/26)  13  The Latest: Bob Dylan opens Desert Trip with 80-minute set

The latest on the Desert Trip music festival in Indio, California, which features six legendary acts over three days: the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters... 2016-10-08 01:46 778Bytes article.wn.com

(2.04/26)  14  Jeremy Corbyn not up to job of Labour leader, says Alan Johnson

Former home secretary questions ability of leader as in-fighting begins again over shadow cabinet reshuffle 2016-10-08 05:27 4KB www.theguardian.com

(1.28/26)  15  Andy Murray beats David Ferrer to reach China Open final

World number two Andy Murray cruises into the final of the China Open after victory over Spain's David Ferrer in Beijing. 2016-10-08 08:07 1KB www.bbc.co.uk

(1.16/26)  16  Lethal Chemical Now Used as a Drug Haunts Theater Hostages

Early one morning in October 2002, a dense white cloud silently filled Moscow's Dubrovka Theater. It had been three days since Chechen militants took more than 800 people hostage. Russian special forces faced an impossible task: liberating the hostages from a theater laced with booby traps... 2016-10-08 05:45 4KB abcnews.go.com

(1.11/26)  17  Chaffetz explains why he's pulling support for Trump

WARNING: This story contains graphic language. 2016-10-08 00:08 2KB rss.cnn.com

(1.05/26)  18  Samsung expects aloft increase notwithstanding Note 7 recall

Image copyright AFP Samsung Electronics says its 2016-10-08 00:00 1KB headlinenewstoday.net

(1.04/26)  19  Billy Bush is an 'entitled jock' who polarized opinion in the studio, says NBC source

NBC insiders have called on the network to fire Billy Bush immediately after a recording of a shocking conversation he had with Donald Trump in 2005 emerged. 2016-10-08 00:54 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(1.03/26)  20  Source: Trump attempted boardroom kiss

Donald Trump is under fire for his vulgar comments about women in an "Access Hollywood" tape -- and one woman alleges he exhibited similar behavior in at least one other incident. 2016-10-08 02:43 2KB rss.cnn.com

(1.02/26)  21  Pierce Brosnan's James Bond style ad causes uproar in India

Pierce Brosnan has come under fire for appearing in an Indian advertisement in which he promotes a product commonly associated with a highly addictive form of chewing tobacco known for its addictive psychotropic effects. 2016-10-08 07:49 2KB www.thedrum.com

(1.02/26)  22  Review: 'The Birth of a Nation' is fiery, but flawed historical fiction

Nate Parker writes, directs and stars in the controversial film. 2016-10-08 07:40 6KB www.mlive.com

(1.02/26)  23  With Only Bad Options in Syria, US Reluctant to Alter Course

The disintegration of diplomatic talks with Russia has left the Obama administration with an array of bad options for what to do next in Syria. Despite harrowing scenes of violence in Aleppo and beyond, President Barack Obama is unlikely to approve any dramatic shift in strategy before... 2016-10-08 07:16 7KB abcnews.go.com

(1.02/26)  24  Verizon offering unlimited text, talk, data for areas affected by Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is still churning off the East Coast, with South Carolina next up in its path. 2016-10-08 05:45 1KB rssfeeds.11alive.com

(1.01/26)  25  Novartis challenges Pfizer with strong breast cancer drug data

By Ben Hirschler COPENHAGEN, Oct 8 (Reuters) - An experimental Novartis pill given with an older drug kept advanced breast cancer in check far longer than st... 2016-10-08 05:10 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(1.00/26)  26  Pak's ISI chief likely to be replaced: report

Islamabad, Oct 8: Chief of Pakistan's powerful spy agency ISI Lt Gen Rizwan Akhtar is likely to be replaced within the next few weeks, a media report said today. Akhtar was appointed the director general of Inter- Services Intelligence (ISI) in... 2016-10-08 05:21 927Bytes article.wn.com

(1.00/26)  27  Grigor Dimitrov jolts Rafael Nadal to reach semis in China

Grigor Dimitrov upset Rafael Nadal for the first time in his career on Friday to advance to the semifinals of the China Open in Beijing. 2016-10-08 02:57 4KB www.upi.com

(0.14/26)  28  Rosberg quickest as rivals get road rage at Japanese Grand Prix

Nico Rosberg posted the quickest time in Saturday's final free practice ahead of a frustrated Lewis Hamilton as Mercedes flexed their muscles for Japanese qu... 2016-10-08 01:02 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(0.03/26)  29  India 75 for two at lunch in Indore test

INDORE, India, Oct 8 (Reuters) - India lost both their openers to reach 75 for two at lunch on the opening day of the third and final test against New Zealan... 2016-10-08 02:24 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(0.02/26)  30  Olympia Valance and boyfriend Greg Cannell attend Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne

She's the Neighbours star known for her effortlessly chic style - and Olympia Valance, 23, was once again leading the style stakes at Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne on Saturday 2016-10-08 06:07 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(0.01/26)  31  Christie Brinkley heads to the Hamptons International Film Festival in youthful appearance

The model put on a chic appearance in a sailor-inspired ensemble, working casual chic. 2016-10-08 08:16 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

(0.01/26)  32  Review: Jean-Michel Jarre brings Electronica to the O2 (Includes first-hand account)

The Frenchman, the Godfather of Electronic Music, stopped off at the large London venue in Greenwich as part of an eight-date nationwide arena tour. Digital Journal was there. 2016-10-08 07:20 5KB www.digitaljournal.com

(0.01/26)  33  VIDEO: Check out Wildhawk In San Francisco's Mission District

ABC7 has partnered with 96.5 KOIT morning host Andrew Hart to bring you "Andrew's Appetite," your weekly inside look at some of the coolest places around the Bay Area. 2016-10-08 02:02 1KB abc7news.com

 34  Samantha Armytage faces a backlash on social media after posing with a shackled tiger in Queensland

Sunrise co-host Sam Armytage, 40, faced a fan backlash on Friday after several Instagram followers commented on her patting a chained tiger. 2016-10-08 08:33 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 35  Docker Training- An Insight on the Best Application Deployment Tool

We all know how important trainings are? Trainings are meant to sharpen an individual’s skills and help him to update about the latest changes in his/her respective sectors. Likewise, people working in the Information Technology sector need to update themselves every now and then because this... 2016-10-08 08:29 3KB article.wn.com

 36  Saginaw native appears in two episodes of Marvel's Luke Cage on Netflix

Brad Fraizer, a 2000 graduate of Heritage High School, appears in two of the season's later episodes. 2016-10-08 08:28 2KB www.mlive.com

 37  Danny Mac's fiancée Carley Stenson moves to London 'to combat Strictly Curse'

Danny Mac and his fiancee Carley Stenson have taken measures against the curse - by moving into a rented house in London for his time on the dance floor. 2016-10-08 08:26 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 38  New in home entertainment: Extended cut of Paul Feig’s much-debated 'Ghostbusters' remake

New on Blu-ray 2016-10-08 08:00 4KB www.latimes.com

 39  Parade of Homes builder spent months creating dry basement for this lakefront luxury home

Building height restrictions, a small lot size and a high water table limited Peterson's ability to build up, out or down around the popular inland lake half an hour northeast of Grand Rapids. 2016-10-08 07:30 5KB realestate.mlive.com

 40  Ray Mears slams Bear Grylls' programmes for teaching audiences nothing

Ray Mears has revealed he does not watch the programmes of British rival Grylls (pictured) - which he labelled as 'entertainment' - as he likes to 'teach people how to do things properly'. 2016-10-08 07:18 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 41  James Norton wears clerical clothing during filming for Granchester's Christmas special

The 31-year-old actor put in a dapper appearance as he posed with his followers on set in Cambridge. 2016-10-08 07:13 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 42  Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones take kids Dylan and Carys to Rolling Stones gig

Despite their busy careers, the couple made sure to make time for each other as they enjoyed a family night out with their two children at The Rolling Stones' set at Desert Trip Festival on Friday. 2016-10-08 07:12 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 43  Pittsburgh's thriving tech sector brings new life to post-industrial city

Academic and healthcare hubs – eds and meds – have helped attract technology companies such as Uber and Google, as showcased by the Thrival festival 2016-10-08 07:00 8KB www.theguardian.com

 44  Mayaro Virus Is Another Little-Known, Mosquito-Borne Disease That Might Warrant More Attention : Goats and Soda : NPR

It's called Mayaro virus. It was first identified in 1954 and has been active near the Amazon. Now it appears to have popped up in Haiti. 2016-10-08 07:00 5KB www.npr.org

 45  Child Brides Learn To Take Portraits Of Each Other — And Gain Insights Into Their Lives

Stephanie Sinclair has been taking photos of child brides for nearly 15 years. Now, she's teaching girls rescued from early marriage how to photograph each other. 2016-10-08 07:00 7KB www.npr.org

 46  Saints' Top 10 salaries in 2016 compared to first-quarter production

Does production equal the paycheck? 2016-10-08 07:00 1KB www.nola.com

 47  Alun Cairns peddling smears about Plaid Cymru, says Leanne Wood

Media captionLeanne Wood and Alun Cairns clash on Question TimeThe leader of Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood has accused the Welsh secretary of peddling 2016-10-08 00:00 3KB headlinenewstoday.net

 48  Scottish historian finds 'Hitler's first autobiography'

The first biography of Adolf Hitler which presented him as "Germany's saviour" and compared him to Jesus may have been written by the future dictator himself, a Scottish historian has claimed. 2016-10-08 06:50 3KB www.digitaljournal.com

 49  Busan: Seyfolah Samadian Reveals Abbas Kiarostami Documentary Project

BUSAN — Long-time Abbas Kiarostami associate Seyfolah Samadian is planning a documentary about 20 years of visits to the Cannes Film Festival that the late director made. Samadian has been do… 2016-10-08 06:37 2KB variety.com

 50  Colombian government, FARC guerrilla force to work on resolving waylaid peace deal

Havana, Oct 8: Colombia's government and FARC guerrilla force have agreed to set up a "rapid and effective" process to "quickly" salvage a hard-won peace deal that was nevertheless rejected at the polls. In a joint declaration, the government and Revolutionary... 2016-10-08 06:34 866Bytes article.wn.com

 51  Lewis Hamilton criticises 'disrespectful' media over social media claims

Lewis Hamilton says he is going to minimise his appearances at news conferences over what he says is a lack of respect from the media. 2016-10-08 06:31 3KB www.bbc.co.uk

 52  Foton flaunts firepower, dominates F2

Foton displayed its full strength against fellow title favorite F2 Logistics to fashion out a 25-18, 25-20, 25-15, Saturday and open its campaign in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix 2016-10-08 00:00 2KB sports.inquirer.net

 53  The Mystery Of The 'Ghost Trees' May Be Solved

The redwood appears like a phantom: as if from thin air. What looked like a trick of the light a moment ago materializes into a trunk, branches, needles - a tree, roughly the height of a man, with... 2016-10-08 06:14 692Bytes article.wn.com

 54  'Clown Purge' craze intensifies as Australian vigilantes lash out at pranksters

The 'Clown Purge' craze which has Australia on high alert has intensified, as costumed creeps menace victims with machetes and vigilantes lash out at the pranksters. 2016-10-08 06:09 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 55  EOTB's Lillie Lexie Gregg exposes her bra and flat stomach in racy jumpsuit

Lillie Lexie Gregg partied the night away in style at Pure Bar in Bexleyheath, London on Friday. 2016-10-08 06:08 4KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 56  Photographer Captures Mesmerizing Scenes From Hindu Rituals

Abbas has been capturing culture and religion around the world for nearly half a century. In his latest body of work, the photographer takes viewers into the mystical world of Hinduism with stunning e... 2016-10-08 06:07 747Bytes article.wn.com

 57  On The Record: Hillary Clinton's Tenure At State

Hillary Clinton was an effective and well-respected Secretary of State at home and abroad. At the end of her time at State, a Washington Post-ABC news poll put her favorability rating at an astounding... 2016-10-08 06:07 737Bytes article.wn.com

 58  Here's Why People Still Think Racist Asian Jokes Are Acceptable

-slanty eyes that perfectly align with Western beauty standards that he realized he had done something wrong. He knew he had said something racist. (It was also sexist if we’re being real - but ... 2016-10-08 06:07 740Bytes article.wn.com

 59  ‘Bigfoot’ gatecrashes Michigan nature webcam (VIDEO, POLL) — RT Viral

Footage from a Michigan webcam watching over an eagle’s nest has caused an online frenzy because of a shadowy figure in the background that some claim is proof that the mythical Bigfoot creature exists. 2016-10-08 06:03 1KB www.rt.com

 60  A Portrait In Numbers

A new report offers a fascinating snapshot of the fastest-growing group of U. S. students. It's data that educators and policy-makers should take seriously. 2016-10-08 06:01 1KB www.npr.org

 61  L. A. police commissioners weighing reforms that would improve LAPD transparency and training on using deadly force

The Los Angeles Police Commission is considering significant changes in the way the LAPD handles shootings by officers, including releasing information to the public more quickly and expanding training designed to reduce the number of shootings. 2016-10-08 06:00 8KB www.latimes.com

 62  A wheelchair ramp may not be pretty, but condo group must allow it

Question: I own a condominium and pay homeowners association dues of approximately $400 per month. My wife recently suffered a severe injury and now uses a wheelchair. She has difficulty maneuvering her wheelchair over the step to the front door of our first-floor condo... 2016-10-08 06:00 2KB www.latimes.com

 63  Owning Twitter could bring Salesforce and its influence-seeking CEO new power

He oversees a technology empire in Northern California. He attracts huge audiences to his company’s events. And he’s celebrated for his philanthropy and social activism. 2016-10-08 06:00 7KB www.latimes.com

 64  At the University of Redlands, guys meet to parse what it means to be men

Marcus Garcia raised his hand in a circle of classmates and stumbled through a question many of them had pondered but not out loud. 2016-10-08 06:00 11KB www.latimes.com

 65  Misery for tourists as 'flash crash' means the pound is now worth less than a euro at airports as sterling reaches a 31-year low

Holidaymakers are being offered as little as €0.97 to the pound at airports in the latest body blow for sterling since an overnight 'flash crash' triggered a dramatic fall in the value of sterling. 2016-10-08 05:58 4KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 66  Kelly Osbourne channels rock chic in all black ensemble and quirky shades as she heads to dinner in Los Angeles

Kelly Osbourne channeled her rockstar genes when she headed to dinner in Los Angeles in an all-black ensemble on Friday night. 2016-10-08 05:56 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 67  Donald Trump's use of Facebook Live for apology highlights platform's credentials over traditional media

Following the Washington Post's publication of a tape recording in which Donald Trump was heard boasting about the lewd acts he carried out on unconsenting women, the presidential candidate used Facebook Live to issue a public apology in a move which further strengthens the platform's credentials as... 2016-10-08 05:39 3KB www.thedrum.com

 68  Melanie Blatt stuns in gold lamé suit as All Saints perform in Glasgow

The newly reformed girl band wowed fans during their Glasgow gig on Friday in an array of black and metallic ensembles on Friday night. 2016-10-08 05:19 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 69  Antimicrobial resistance occurs naturally in soil bacteria

Bacteria, isolated from soil and with no known contact with human society, have been shown to exhibit antimicrobial properties. The organisms were isolated from in prairie soils. 2016-10-08 05:18 3KB www.digitaljournal.com

 70  Some retailers will avoid opening on Thanksgiving

Pre-Black Friday sales have been common in recent years, with shoppers scurrying to stores after Thanksgiving 2016-10-08 04:32 683Bytes article.wn.com

 71  Girls spend much more time on chores than boys: U. N.

Girls spend 160 million more hours a day performing unpaid household chores than boys around the world, according to a new report from Unicef. On average, girls between 5 and 14 years old spend 40 percent more time than boys performing unpaid chores, including cooking, cleaning, and collecting water... 2016-10-08 04:30 989Bytes article.wn.com

 72  After cancer treatment, complementary care calms

Alternative therapies help women cope with breast cancer treatment 2016-10-08 04:02 9KB rssfeeds.usatoday.com

 73  At Willowbrook Museum Village, a chapter of history closes

News of the outdoor museum's closing has brought a wave of visitors who, along with history buffs and teachers, say the 20-structure village will be impossible to replace. 2016-10-08 04:00 10KB www.pressherald.com

 74  NHS leadership needs to give staff a powerful voice in any system change

Sustainability and transformation plans are focused on structures and process but they are ultimately worthless without clinical buy-in and leadership 2016-10-08 04:00 5KB www.theguardian.com

 75  UN calls on Saudi Arabia to stop torturing, executing minors in scathing report — RT News

A UN watchdog has slammed Saudi Arabia for subjecting minors as young as 15 to stoning, flogging, amputation, and even execution, contrary to the children rights convention, but a Saudi official reportedly responded that sharia is “above all laws and treaties.” 2016-10-08 03:45 4KB www.rt.com

 76  Wis. officials acknowledge DMV made mistakes about voter ID rules

But attorneys for the state insist the problem is fixed, and the media exaggerated the problems 2016-10-08 03:42 5KB www.cbsnews.com

 77  Northern Ireland manager Michael O'Neill ready for two very different tests against San Marino and Germany

Northern Ireland will be presented with different challenges when facing San Marino and Germany over four days, yet Michael O'Neill is confident his squad are prepared for the contrasting tests. 2016-10-08 03:38 3KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 78  Iconic Windows service host process will be discontinued

Microsoft plans a nice surprise for its Windows 10 users. In the latest Windows Insider Build analysts see very important tweaks applied to background 2016-10-08 03:34 1KB www.roundnews.com

 79  Thierry Fremaux on Tarantino, Winding Refn, Deneuve, Noe

LYON, France — Could Lyon’s Lumière Festival – an event dedicated near entirely to classic movies – be shaping up, outside animation, as France’s second biggest film festival? Las… 2016-10-08 03:22 9KB variety.com

 80  Pia Miller gives fans a glimpse of her toned midriff

She recently whisked herself away with a group of girlfriends for a long weekend getaway on Hayman Island 2016-10-08 03:18 1KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 81  WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief: 2016-10-08 03:03 33KB www.charlotteobserver.com

 82  The best Australian homes only Chinese millionaires can afford to buy

A weeklong holiday in China sees planeloads of rich investors arrive in Australia to inspect some spectacular properties with luxury Sydney Harbour views, as estate agents give them VIP treatment. 2016-10-08 03:01 6KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 83  The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam by Christopher Goscha – review

This is the finest single-volume history of Vietnam in English. It challenges myths, and raises questions about the socialist republic’s political future 2016-10-08 03:00 8KB www.theguardian.com

 84  Police Department Offers Advice On ‘Creepy Clown’ Encounters

To people dressing up as clowns: Spooked people may very well react in self-defense. 2016-10-08 03:00 2KB chicago.cbslocal.com

 85  Panasonic announces a new stretchable battery

Panasonic has unveiled a new flexible battery which is being showcased at Ceatec, a technology exhibition in Japan. According to the company, the battery can be 2016-10-08 00:00 1KB headlinenewstoday.net

 86  Don’t call me a British artist – I’m thoroughly European

Writers can never be politically neutral. That’s why I’ve turned down an invitation to an event intent on rebranding our cross-pollinated culture 2016-10-08 02:30 5KB www.theguardian.com

 87  'The Girl on the Train' is story of female empowerment, says star Emily Blunt

'I feel like this film represents women's right to be bad and flawed and wrong and messed up,' actress Blunt says. 'I think women around the world are going to applaud that.' 2016-10-08 02:00 3KB www.csmonitor.com

 88  Krysten Ritter rocks a dark ensemble even Jessica Jones would envy as she jets out of LA

Dressed comfortably in a black knit sweater, the 34-year-old Jessica Jones actress seemed to be in top spirits as she smiled while strolling through the transport hub in Los Angeles on Friday. 2016-10-08 01:58 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 89  Pacific walrus begin arriving ashore on Alaska's northwest coast

The massive islands have gathered by thousands each fall on a barrier island as a result of the warming climate 2016-10-08 01:57 2KB www.cbsnews.com

 90  U-D Jesuit's Scott Nelson, De La Salle's Allen Stritzinger show talent

Nelson has trimmed his list to Michigan State, Penn State, Iowa, Wisconsin and Northwestern 2016-10-08 01:38 2KB rssfeeds.freep.com

 91  Trump faces female voter problems in Oakland County

Democrat Hillary Clinton led GOP’s Donald Trump by 20 percentage points in last week’s Detroit News/WDIV statewide poll 2016-10-08 01:29 8KB rssfeeds.detroitnews.com

 92  The ‘quiet catastrophe’ of unemployment

The work rate for adult men has plunged 13 percentage points in a half-century 2016-10-08 01:19 4KB rssfeeds.detroitnews.com

 93  WATCH : Zambian police clash with opposition supporters

A video showing Zambian police clashing with opposition leader Hakainde Hichilema's supporters has emerged on social media. 2016-10-08 01:04 2KB www.news24.com

 94  Dear Abby: My boyfriend mopes a lot, seldom speaks

He says he's bored, and girlfriend is afraid that means he doesn't want to be in the relationship anymore. 2016-10-08 01:00 2KB chicago.suntimes.com

 95  Graham: 3 horror movies that deliver actual chills

Horror movies are fun, especially this time of year. But here are three that aren’t kidding around in terms of terror. 2016-10-08 00:48 4KB rssfeeds.detroitnews.com

 96  Newspaper headlines: Tax issues for England pair and 'hard' Brexit warning

Tax issues for both England's manager and captain make the front pages, along with warnings over a "hard Brexit" and a "creepy clown craze" sweeping Britain. 2016-10-08 08:33 3KB www.bbc.co.uk

 97  Nicky Hilton is a proud mom as she pushes daughter Lily Grace around SoHo

Nicky Hilton is clearly over the moon since giving birth to her baby girl Lily Grace on July 8. 2016-10-08 00:20 1KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 98  Pregnant Molly Sims looks perky in polka dots with daughter Scarlett in Santa Monica

She is currently pregnant with her third child. And on Friday, Molly Sims enjoyed a day of shopping in Santa Monica with daughter Scarlett Stuber. 2016-10-08 00:12 2KB www.dailymail.co.uk

 99  Closing time comes early for 'Cheers Live on Stage'

It's last call for "Cheers Live on Stage," the 2016-10-08 00:06 1KB chicago.suntimes.com

 100  The American Spectator

It is time for Donald Trump to go back to Trump Tower. Time for Mike Pence to move to the top of the ticket... 2016-10-08 08:32 3KB spectator.org

Articles

DC5m United States art in english 100 articles, created at 2016-10-08 16:11

 

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Trump apologizes for his crude remarks in 2005 video (25.99/26)

"I've said and done things I regret," he said. "Anyone who knows me knows these words don't reflect who I am. I said it, I was wrong, and I apologize. "
Trump offered the remarks -- believed to be the first full public apology that he has made in the duration of a campaign laced with insults and rhetoric -- in a filmed statement hours after The Washington Post released a shocking video of Trump offensively bragging about grabbing women and pursuing sex with them with impunity.
"I've never said I'm a perfect person nor pretended to be someone I'm not," Trump said.
"I pledge to be a better man tomorrow. "
But the provocative billionaire quickly and defiantly pivoted from his own crisis to attack the husband of his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, saying former president Bill Clinton "abused" women.
"I've said some foolish things, but there's a big difference between the words and actions of other people," he said.
Watch: 7 of the times Trump has said he respects women
"Bill Clinton has actually abused women, and Hillary has bullied, attacked, and shamed his victims.
"We'll discuss this in the coming days," Trump said. "See you at the debate on Sunday. "
Trump's crisis comes at a precarious moment for his campaign. He squares off against Clinton for the second time on Sunday, in St. Louis, trailing the Democratic nominee in the polls, and with Clinton enjoying a dramatic lead over Trump with women voters.
In the 2005 video, Trump is heard using predatory language as he describes hitting on a married woman and grabbing women's crotches.
"When you're a star they let you do it. You can do anything," he says.
Donald Trump releases statement about vulgar 2005 recording
washingtonpost.com
Mike Lee releases statement on Trump's vulgar comments on women
washingtonpost.com
Tape reveals Donald Trump boast about groping women
article.wn.com
Quotations in the News
article.wn.com
Mike Pence: Trump is “still standing stronger than ever”
cbsnews.com
How ‘Access Hollywood’ unearthed Donald Trump’s vulgar video
nypost.com
The GOP’s brutal responses to the new Trump video, broken down
washingtonpost.com
Trump apologizes, but also calls crude remarks a distraction
wral.com

 

 2 /100 

LIVE | Hurricane Matthew Interactive Coverage (17.99/26)

As Hurricane Matthew continues to make its way to the Georgia coastline, 11Alive will be live with you through the storm. Our continuous live coverage will be answering your questions and taking you with us behind the scenes as we cover Hurricane Matthew from Atlanta and across the southeast.
(© 2016 WXIA)
WXIA
Airlines cancel flights and waive fees due to Hurricane Matthew
WXIA
GSP closes I-16 eastbound, converts to only westbound lanes
WXIA
Mandatory evacuations in Georgia ahead of Hurricane Matthew
Hurricane Matthew batters South Carolina's coast
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Hurricane Matthew leaves nearly 1.4 mln in U.S. Southeast powerless
dailymail.co.uk
Hurricane Matthew lashes Carolinas as Category 2 storm
article.wn.com
Hurricane Matthew Downgraded to Cat. 1 in Approach to Carolinas
newsmax.com
Hurricane Matthew Tests US Response Lessons From Katrina
article.wn.com
Hurricane Matthew weakens to Cat 1 along Carolina coast
rssfeeds.usatoday.com
NHC downgrades Matthew to Category 1 hurricane
dailymail.co.uk
Hurricane Matthew kills almost 900 in Haiti
article.wn.com

 

 3 /100 

Fallout continues for Donald Trump in wake of lewd recorded comments about women (14.99/26)

The release of a  recording  of  Donald Trump  bragging about groping women drew harsh statements from both Republicans and Democrats condemning the GOP presidential nominee. 
There were calls for him to step down. Here are some of those comments:
"There are no excuses for Donald Trump’s offensive and demeaning comments. No woman should ever be victimized by this kind of inappropriate behavior. He alone bears the burden of his conduct and alone should suffer the consequences.”
Read more
Mike Lee releases statement on Trump's vulgar comments on women
washingtonpost.com
Trump says ‘he never was perfect’ after backlash over groping & married sex comments (VIDEO) — RT America
rt.com
Quotations in the News
article.wn.com
Mike Pence: Trump is “still standing stronger than ever”
cbsnews.com
Trump recorded having extremely lewd conversation about women in 2005
washingtonpost.com
McCrory calls Trump comments about women 'disgusting'
wral.com
Trump apologizes for ‘foolish’ comments about women, then attacks the Clintons
washingtonpost.com
Billy Bush under fire along with Trump for lewd comments
wtop.com

 

 4 /100 

Two suspects blow themselves up during Ankara police operation (7.99/26)

Two suicide bombers detonated their explosives during a police operation in the Turkish capital Ankara on Saturday after officers called on the suspects to surrender, state media reported.
They set off the car bomb they had prepared, the official Anadolu news agency said, adding that the two suspects were dead.
There were no immediate reports of any other casualties in the blast, which occurred Saturday morning in the outskirts of the city.
Ankara governor Ercan Topaca told reporters at the scene it was "likely" that they had connections to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK).
"The materials used, the construction and the way it was planned point to the PKK a little," he said, quoted by Anadolu.
The PKK -- proscribed as a terrorist organisation by Turkey, the EU and US -- has been waging a 32-year insurgency against the state in the country's southeast.
Violence returned to the region after the collapse of a two-year ceasefire last year.
The governor said police began an operation early on Saturday to find the suspects after a tip-off came from Diyarbakir, a mainly Kurdish province in Turkey's southeast.
In televised comments, Topaca also said the suspects were a male born in the eastern province of Bingol and an unidentified female. She was later named in Turkish media.
He added that the authorities were looking for a third person and that "interestingly" the suicide bombers hung a Turkish flag on the car.
CNN-Turk broadcaster reported that 200 kilos (more than 400 pounds) of ammonium nitrate and plastic explosives were seized during the operation.
The bombing comes two days before the first anniversary of Turkey's deadliest terror attack in its modern history in Ankara which left 103 dead. The attack was blamed on jihadists from the Islamic State group.
And on Friday, the Kurdish group Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK) with ties to the PKK claimed responsibility for a motorbike bombing on Thursday near a police station which wounded 10 people.
2 Bombers Blow Themselves Up After Police Stop in Turkey
nytimes.com
2 bombers blow themselves up after police stop in Turkey
article.wn.com
2 bombers blow themselves up after police stop in Turkey
lasvegassun.com
News24.com | 2 bombers, stopped by police, blew themselves up in Ankara
article.wn.com
2 bombers stopped by police blow themselves up in Turkey
nypost.com
2 Bombers Blow Themselves up After Police Stop in Turkey
abcnews.go.com
Ankara suicide bombers blow themselves up as police move in
independent.ie
2 suicide bombers blow themselves up in Ankara during police op — RT News
rt.com

 

 5 /100 

Hillary Clinton-Donald Trump Debate: The Objectives Of Each Candidate (5.79/26)

For the second US presidential debate, Sunday night in St Louis, the pressure is squarely on Donald Trump, who needs a moment of political magic to reverse his slide in polls barely four weeks from...
Clinton would extend Obama’s policies; Trump emulates Bush
lasvegassun.com
Clinton vs. Trump: Everything you need to know about the second debate
rssfeeds.usatoday.com
Trump apologizes for ‘foolish’ comments about women, then attacks the Clintons
washingtonpost.com
Too late America: Donald Trump will be the Republican candidate
article.wn.com
When would Clinton, Trump use nukes? Why voters aren't asking.
csmonitor.com
Michael Moore holds Clinton rally in Trump Country
rssfeeds.detroitnews.com
Clinton ahead of Trump by 5 points in presidential race: Poll
article.wn.com

 

 6 /100 

Japan's Mount Aso volcano erupts and blankets cities in ash in Kyushu (3.41/26)

A volcano has burst into life on Japan's Mount Aso, spewing clouds of grey volcanic ash over entire towns as far as 250 kilometres away. The volcano on the main island of Kyushu, in south-west Japan, rumbled to life early on Saturday, belching a column of ash thousands of metres into the sky. Images show cleaners setting to work mopping a blanket of ash from cars in a yard as meteorologists warned of a heavy ash fall and falling rocks within 30 kilometres of the tourist attraction. Moderate and light ash falls are forecast for as far as 250 kilometres away from the tourist attraction. There were no immediate reports of injuries from the eruption, which began at 1:46 a.m. local time on one of the peaks of the 1,592-metre mountain. Japan Meteorological Agency issued its third-highest alert, warning people to avoid the volcano after it erupted. Mount Aso, which dominates the island, has not erupted at the peak since January 1980, media reports said. Japan sits on the so-called Pacific 'Ring of Fire' where a large proportion of the world's quakes and volcanic eruptions are recorded. On September 27, Japan suffered its deadliest eruption in almost 90 years when Mount Ontake, in central Nagano prefecture, erupted unexpectantly An estimated 63 people were killed as the peak was packed with hikers out to see the region's spectacular autumn hues.
Mount Aso largest active volcano in southwest Japan erupts another eruption predicted
bignewsnetwork.com
Japan’s Mount Aso erupts, no reports of injuries
article.wn.com
Japan's Mount Aso Volcano Erupts, No Injuries Reported
article.wn.com
Japan: Mount Aso volcano belches out 11,000-meter ash cloud
rss.cnn.com
Volcano in southern Japan erupts; no injuries
article.wn.com
Japan's Mount Aso volcano erupts, no injuries reported
dailymail.co.uk
Volcano erupts in Japan; no injuries
article.wn.com

 

 7 /100 

A look at the 1st 100 days of Duterte's phenomenal rule (3.29/26)

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — In just 100 days in office, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has stirred a hornet's nest by picking a fight with Barack Obama, the United Nations, the European Union and others who have criticized his brutal crackdown...
Lawlessness remains in Duterte’s 1st 100 days–pro-democracy group
newsinfo.inquirer.net
A look at the first 100 days of Duterte's turbulent rule
cbs46.com
A Look at the 1st 100 Days of Duterte's Phenomenal Rule
article.wn.com
A look at the 1st 100 days of Duterte’s phenomenal rule
newsinfo.inquirer.net
'He's vulgar – but honest': Filipinos on Duterte's first 100 days in office
theguardian.com

 

 8 /100 

Wikileaks release transcripts of Hillary Clinton's closed-doors Wall Street speeches (3.12/26)

Hillary Clinton admitted to being 'kind of far removed' from the middle class, according to a leaked transcript of a speech she gave on Wall Street. administration officials have 'removed any reasonable doubt that the Kremlin has weaponized Wikileaks to meddle in our election and benefit Donald Trump’s candidacy'. Clinton once bemoaned the challenges to running for office, according to a 2013 transcript. 'Part of the problem with the political situation, too, is that there is such a bias against people who have led successful and/or complicated lives,' she said according to the email. 'You know, the divestment of assets, the stripping of all kinds of positions, the sale of stocks. It just becomes very onerous and unnecessary.' Other remarks indicate Clinton expressed pro-trade positions. 'My dream is a hemispheric common market, with open trade and open borders, some time in the future with energy that is as green and sustainable as we can get it, powering growth and opportunity for every person in the hemisphere,' the transcript reads. Several of the excerpts included in Clarrk's email discuss security concerns regarding the use of personal computers and Blackerries during her time at the State Department. 'Every time I went to countries like China or Russia, I mean, we couldn't take our computers, we couldn't take our personal devices, we couldn't take anything off the plane because they're so good, they would penetrate them in a minute, less, a nanosecond. So we would take the batteries out, we'd leave them on the plane,' she said according to a 2014 transcript.
Clinton admits estrangement from middle class in Wall Street paid speech — RT America
rt.com
WikiLeaks posts apparent excerpts of Clinton Wall Street speeches
rss.cnn.com
Hillary Clinton's Wall St speeches published by Wikileaks
bbc.co.uk

 

 9 /100 

3 big questions Donald Trump will have to answer about this lewd video (2.65/26)

Donald Trump issued a more-extensive apology late Friday night for a newly unearthed video of him talking in graphic and lewd terms about trying to have sex with a woman, among other topics.
And given the fact that we're headed for a debate in a little more than 36 hours — and given Trump is still only kind-of apologizing, while also using the opportunity to start attacking the Clintons for Bill Clinton's behavior — it's likely the video will be a significant focus of the questioning at the debate and afterward.
It's not clear whether Trump will answer reporters' questions before the debate. He was apparently  disinvited from an appearance with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) on Saturday.
But there remain plenty of big questions. And if and when Trump does get these questions — at the debate or otherwise — here's what he should be asked.
1. Did he actually pursue a married woman?
While Trump's comments are lewd, there is also the fact that he said he was pursuing a woman he admitted was married.
“And I moved on her very heavily in fact,” he said. “I took her out furniture shopping. She wanted to get some furniture. I said I’ll show you where they have some nice furniture. I took her out furniture. I moved on her like a bitch, but I couldn’t get there, and she was married.”
This is a pretty detailed story — taking the woman furniture shopping — for Trump to have made it up whole-cloth. Did Trump know the woman was married when he "moved on" her? Does or did he often do this?
2. Was he married to Melania Trump at the time?
Trump told the story at a time when he was married to Melania Trump. They married in January 2005, and the video appears to have been shot around Sept. 16, 2005, according to The Post's David Fahrenthold.
Trump also alludes in the video to Melania being "okay" with him kissing and hugging other women when he greets them.
But was the particular story he tells about pursuing a woman about a time when he was also married to Melania Trump, or dating her? The two married in 2005 but met in 1998.
Trump's history of infidelity is well-documented , and this certainly invites questions about whether it continued.
3. How often does he talk like this?
Trump said in his apology that "anyone who knows me knows these words don't reflect who I am. I said it, I was wrong, and I apologize. "
But the Associated Press recently recent reported on employees of his NBC reality show, "The Apprentice," saying Trump often spoke in very similar terms during the production of that show. From the AP's report Monday :
In his years as a reality TV boss on "The Apprentice," Donald Trump repeatedly demeaned women with sexist language, according to show insiders who said he rated female contestants by the size of their breasts and talked about which ones he'd like to have sex with.
...
Eight former crew members recalled that he repeatedly made lewd comments about a camerawoman he said had a nice rear, comparing her beauty to that of his daughter, Ivanka.
...
Randal Pinkett, who won the program in December 2005 and who has recently criticized Trump during his run for president, said he remembered the real estate mogul talking about which female contestants he wanted to sleep with, even though Trump had married former model Melania Knauss earlier that year: "He was like 'Isn't she hot, check her out,' kind of gawking, something to the effect of 'I'd like to hit that.' "
The Trump campaign issued a full denial in response to the AP report. "These outlandish, unsubstantiated, and totally false claims fabricated by publicity hungry, opportunistic, disgruntled former employees, have no merit whatsoever," Trump spokesman Hope Hicks said at the time.
But the behavior described in the AP report is very similar to the behavior we now see with our own eyes on the newly unearthed video. The claims of the people the AP talked to don't seem very "outlandish" anymore.
Stories like this have a tendency to snowball, and Trump has been wearing a microphone for a large portion of the past few decades. If he spoke like this frequently, now would be a good time to say so.
How ‘Access Hollywood’ unearthed Donald Trump’s vulgar video
nypost.com
Transcript of Trump video statement in response to lewd remarks about women
dailymail.co.uk
Trump apologizes for lewd comments in video, says Bill Clinton is worse
nypost.com

 

 10 /100 

The 'p-word' problem: Trump's comments pose issue for news outlets (2.38/26)

The 2005 videotape in which Donald Trump can be heard making vulgar comments about women posed a dilemma for news outlets: do they run in full the most vital and graphic line of a news story that could help determine a presidential election -- or do they censor it for the sake of decency?
On the tape, Trump can be heard making a number of sexist remarks. But the one that has gotten the most attention thus far is one in which he brags, "And when you're a star they let you do it. You can do anything... Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything. "
The Los Angeles Times, for one, decided to censor. As of Friday evening, the story on its website about the tape read, "At one point, he is heard saying, 'Grab them by the [crotch],' though Trump uses a more vulgar term. 'You can do anything.'"
The Washington Post, which broke the news, also censored itself, using "p---y. " A story on Fox News' website Friday evening didn't use the quote at all. "The developer and reality TV star-turned GOP presidential candidate uses a vulgar anatomical term and discusses trying to have sex with an unidentified, married woman," the article read.
On the other hand, the historically staid New York Times didn't censor itself, and used the word in full. So did Politico, and NBC News' website. CNN also used the word on air, as well as in its its stories online, but presented a disclaimer at the top -- as in this article -- warning readers of the graphic language. (It also bleeped the f-word on air.)
Other outlets were more creative. The New York Daily News tweeted out the cover of its Saturday edition, which uses images of cats to censor the word.
Early look at tomorrow's front page What Trump said he liked to do to attractive women: "GRAB THEM BY THE P---Y" https://t.co/HPZdvyep1p pic.twitter.com/cYd9IRB4sP
Some outlets that did include the word in their stories avoided using it in headlines, instead opting for descriptions like "vulgar" and "crude. " Others -- including Talking Points Memo, Esquire, The Daily Dot, and Mediaite -- presented it in their headlines as "p***y," "p---y," "pus*y" or "p*ssy.*
Following the revelation of his remarks, Trump issued a statement saying that it was "locker room banter, a private conversation that took place many years ago. Bill Clinton has said far worse to me on the golf course - not even close. I apologize if anyone was offended. "
'You are disgusting a pig as Trump': Billy Bush slammed on social media as former fans call for him to be fired from NBC
dailymail.co.uk
Trump issues apology for 2005 vulgar comments on women
abc7news.com

 

 11 /100 

'We have to persevere': Colombian president hopes Nobel Prize can help push peace process (2.18/26)

A roller-coaster fortnight for Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos — who signed a historic agreement to end a half-century-old guerrilla war only to see it rejected by voters — ended in euphoria Friday when he was awarded the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize. John Otis looks at whether the award could help revive the peace process. ...
Peace deal falters, but Colombian wins Nobel
article.wn.com
Nobel Prize boosts Colombian leader's pursuit of peace
article.wn.com
Colombia’s president is awarded Nobel Peace Prize
post-gazette.com
Colombia's Santos wins Nobel Peace Prize in boost for troubled talks
newhampshire.com

 

 12 /100 

Copycat: Threatening clowns seen in UK, following US trend (2.06/26)

LONDON (AP) — British police have warned about people in clown outfits acting suspiciously and sometimes wielding knives as they follow people. The warning Saturday follows a string of incidents in recent days in an apparent effort to copy clown-related threats in the United States. Police in Gloucestershire said there have been six reports of clowns acting suspiciously and sometimes in a threatening way. Police say no arrests have been made because the people dressed as clowns have left the scene before police arrived. The incidents in Gloucestershire followed earlier reports of disturbances in other parts of Britain. Police said a masked man with a knife jumped out and threatened children in Durham on Friday and that several people dressed as clowns chased a young boy the day before in Suffolk.
Copycat: Threatening Clowns Seen in UK, Following US Trend
abcnews.go.com
Threatening clowns seen in UK, following US trend
mynorthwest.com

 

 13 /100 

The Latest: Bob Dylan opens Desert Trip with 80-minute set (2.06/26)

The latest on the Desert Trip music festival in Indio, California, which features six legendary acts over three days: the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, Roger Waters...
Bob Dylan plays 80-minute set to open Desert Trip festival
lasvegassun.com
Bob Dylan plays 80-minute set to open Desert Trip festival
cbs46.com

 

 14 /100 

Jeremy Corbyn not up to job of Labour leader, says Alan Johnson (2.04/26)

Alan Johnson, the Labour former home secretary, has insisted Jeremy Corbyn is not up to being opposition leader, as the party enters fresh in-fighting after a shadow cabinet shake-up.
Johnson’s damning assessment came as the chairman of the parliamentary party, John Cryer, condemned Corbyn’s changes to his senior team .
When it was put to Johnson by the BBC that he believed Corbyn was not up to the job of being leader, he said: “Me and many of my colleagues; perhaps he’ll prove me wrong.”
As the backlash against Corbyn’s reshuffle intensified, Cryer complained that he and the sacked chief whip Rosie Winterton had been kept in the dark about the move, despite have held talks with the leadership about having some of the shadow cabinet posts elected by MPs.
The shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry defended Corbyn, saying it was wrong to criticise him for being “too decisive” and insisting the issue of elected posts was still on the table.
“It’s not a question of ‘forget all that’; there are negotiations going on. There’s an NEC (national executive committee) away day in which this issue is going to be discussed, as part of a larger package in terms of making sure that the party is more democratic, and these negotiations are ongoing. What do you want?” she said on the BBC Radio 4 Today programme on Saturday.
“The problem is that, on the one hand people criticise, and have been criticising, Jeremy for being weak, for taking too long on his reshuffles, taking a couple of days, and yet when when he decides that he will do a reshuffle that he needs to do in order to fill vacancies and in order to reach out, people then criticise him for being too decisive and too strong.”
Thornberry dismissed criticism that the top four positions in the shadow cabinet were held by north London MPs.
“Half of the shadow cabinet come from the Midlands and the north, what is your problem?” she said.
Cryer set out his concerns over the reshuffle in a letter to MPs.
“Rosie and I were keen to continue these negotiations this week and tried to arrange meetings with the leader’s office to come to an agreement as soon as possible,” he wrote. “However, it became clear on Wednesday that a reshuffle was under way, which had not been discussed or mentioned. It now seems to me that the party’s leadership did not engage in the talks in any constructive way. Obviously, I deeply regret this turn of events.”
The sacking of Winterton, and the elevation of key Corbyn ally Diane Abbott to shadow home secretary, provoked anger among moderate MPs in what some described as a “revenge reshuffle”.
Jon Ashworth, one of the few remaining moderates in the shadow cabinet, was promoted to shadow health secretary, but lost his place on the NEC to a Corbyn loyalist, which could tip the finely balanced body in the leadership’s favour as it decides on whether to have elected posts.
Only a handful of the 63 people who quit the shadow cabinet in the summer returned to the fold, but more may take the remaining junior posts yet to be announced.
Although critical of the leader, Johnson said Corbyn needed “time and space” to do his job.
Thornberry defends Corbyn in Labour reshuffle row
bbc.co.uk
The delicious history of edible Edens Corbyn, my bae: Olly Alexander on why he supports the Labour leader
newstatesman.com

 

 15 /100 

Andy Murray beats David Ferrer to reach China Open final (1.28/26)

World number two Andy Murray cruised into the final of the China Open after a 6-2 6-3 victory over Spain's David Ferrer in Beijing.
Murray, 29, secured victory over fifth seed Ferrer in one hour, 30 minutes.
The British number one seed was dominant throughout and will face Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov in Sunday's final.
Earlier, British number one Johanna Konta reached the women's final and broke into the world top 10.
Murray has reached nine finals in 2016, but it is the first time he has made it through to the China Open final.
The Scot was a break down in the opening set before coming back to win the next five games.
Ferrer had lost his previous six encounters with Murray and there was no coming back after the Scot went 4-2 up.
The double Olympic champion then took a 3-1 lead in the second set, and despite losing his serve he came back to clinch a place in the final.
Dimitrov took the other final spot after his semi-final opponent, Milos Raonic, was forced to withdraw with an ankle injury.
Winter Ski Training
Junior Cricket Coaching Course
Johanna Konta beats Madison Keys to reach China Open final and become first British woman to reach top 10 since Jo Durie 32 years ago
dailymail.co.uk
Andy Murray through to China Open final
dailymail.co.uk
Murray, Dimitrov advance to China Open final
dailymail.co.uk
Andy Murray through to China Open final after defeating David Ferrer in straight sets in Beijing
dailymail.co.uk
Johanna Konta reaches final of China Open - and breaks into the world top 10
dailymail.co.uk
Johanna Konta into world top 10 after reaching China Open final
bbc.co.uk

 

 16 /100 

Lethal Chemical Now Used as a Drug Haunts Theater Hostages (1.16/26)

Early one morning in October 2002, a dense white cloud silently filled Moscow's Dubrovka Theater.
It had been three days since Chechen militants took more than 800 people hostage. Russian special forces faced an impossible task: liberating the hostages from a theater laced with booby traps and several dozen suicide bombers. They turned to chemicals Russian scientists had been researching for years, and pumped an aerosol containing potent forms of the synthetic opioid fentanyl into the theater before storming it.
As the mysterious substance descended, people knelt, covering their faces as best they could, according to eyewitness accounts. No one was choking. People simply dropped into what appeared to be a deep sleep.
"I lay down and started praying," said Vladimir Stukanov, the director of the children's troupe at the theater. His friend, Boris Lapin, had given him his coat, which Stukanov pressed to his face. "Boris died, but saved me," he said.
Commandos stormed the theater and killed the attackers, but more than 120 hostages died from the effects of the chemicals. Many survivors suffered lasting health effects.
The Russian government acknowledged that the aerosol contained fentanyl-related compounds, but refused to reveal the exact composition. Years later, British government scientists tested clothing and urine samples from three survivors and concluded that the aerosol contained carfentanil, one of the most potent opioids on the planet, as well as the less-powerful remifentanil.
Today, carfentanil is readily available from vendors in China , who offer to export the deadly substance around the world, no questions asked, an Associated Press investigation has found. Carfentanil is not a controlled substance in China, the world's largest chemicals exporter, despite U. S. efforts to get Beijing to blacklist it.
Olga Dolotova, an engineer, remembers seeing the plumes descend in the theater before losing consciousness. Later, she heard someone say, "She is alive. " When Dolotova opened her eyes again, she found herself on a bus packed with bodies.
"It was such a horror just to look at it," she said. "Nobody was moving. They put the people there like dolls. "
Dolotova wanted to get up, or shout. She wanted the bus to stop. And she badly needed to vomit. "I was having spasms, but I could not throw up," she said. When she reached the hospital, she gulped down some tea and began retching. "I continued throwing up and throwing up and throwing up," she said.
She said she understands why Russian special forces used the chemicals. "They had to somehow render them immobile," she said of the militants. "What else was there? "
But she said medical and rescue personnel were not trained to deal with effects of the mysterious aerosol and made deadly errors — failing, for example, to tilt people's heads so they didn't choke on their own tongues. "More people would have been saved," she said.
The aerosol created a kind of sleep without memory, Stukanov said.
"It's like this cluster has been erased and dropped out of your head," he said.
———
Danilova reported from Washington. AP writer Iuliia Subbotovska, video journalist Veronika Silchenko and news assistant Sergei Fedotov in Moscow contributed to this report.
Lethal chemical now used as a drug haunts theater hostages
article.wn.com

 

 17 /100 

Chaffetz explains why he's pulling support for Trump (1.11/26)

Washington (CNN) — The Republican congressman who led the investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server explained on Friday why he's no longer voting for Donald Trump.
Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz told CNN's Don Lemon that he can no longer support Trump for President after his extremely vulgar comments about women from unaired footage filmed in 2005.
"My wife, Julia and I, we have a 15-year-old daughter," Chaffetz said. "Do you think I can look her in the eye and tell her that I endorsed Donald Trump for president when he acts like this and his apology? That was no apology, that was an apology for getting caught. "
Chaffetz, the House Oversight Committee chairman who led the Hill investigation into Clinton's email use while secretary of state, continued: "So I'm not going to put my good name and reputation and my family behind Donald Trump when he acts like this, I just can't do it. "
Trump bragged about trying to have sex with a married woman and being able to grope women in footage leaked from 2005 that surfaced on Friday.
Among other lewd statements, Trump said, "When you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything... Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything. "
Trump later issued a brief apology, calling the conversation "locker room banter. "
Chaffetz disagreed.
"This was not just locker talk -- this was offensive," he said. "I can't tell the good people of Utah that I endorsed a person who acts like this. "
Asked whether Trump could do anything to make it up to voters and the Republican Party, Chaffetz responded, "I don't know. "
Lemon repeatedly asked if Chaffetz thinks Trump should "step aside. "
"Well I do think (Trump's running mate) Mike Pence should be at the top of the ticket," he said. "I really do... he is a person of high moral fiber. "
Chaffetz said he "felt bad" for the country, adding that "everyone is going to have to figure this out" for themselves.
Republicans slam Trump -- but slow to pull endorsements
rss.cnn.com
Gov. Herbert, Rep. Chaffetz won't support Trump following 'despicable' comments
deseretnews.com

 

 18 /100 

Samsung expects aloft increase notwithstanding Note 7 recall (1.05/26)

Samsung Electronics says a handling increase are approaching to have risen in a third quarter, notwithstanding a remember of a Galaxy Note 7 smartphone.
Profits for a Jul to Sep duration are foresee to be 5.6% aloft during 7.8 trillion won ($7bn; £5.7bn).
Analysts had approaching worse numbers after a Note 7 remember over inadequate batteries and “exploding” phones .
The earnings guidance does not give any sum about a opening of particular businesses.
The flagship Galaxy Note 7 was removed in 10 markets around a world, including a US, Europe and South Korea.
Some estimates had suggested a remember would revoke Samsung’s increase by 1tn won or more.
However, a clever opening by a chip and arrangement business is approaching to have equivalent some of those losses.
The gain superintendence did not criticism on calls by investors to radically restructure a firm into dual apart holding and handling companies.
On Thursday, Samsung had pronounced it was “carefully reviewing” a suggestion.
Birmingham City Council Schools arch ‘told to go if pregnant’
headlinenewstoday.net
FTSE 100 behind above 7,000 as bruise slides
headlinenewstoday.net
Brexit: British expats sue EU’s Juncker over talks
headlinenewstoday.net
Bots v apps
headlinenewstoday.net
Bernard Matthews creditors told ‘£23m debts’ will not be paid
headlinenewstoday.net
Brexit: LSE unfamiliar experts ‘should not advise ministers’
headlinenewstoday.net

 

 19 /100 

Billy Bush is an 'entitled jock' who polarized opinion in the studio, says NBC source (1.04/26)

NBC insiders have called on the network to fire Billy Bush immediately after a recording of a shocking conversation he had with Donald Trump in 2005 emerged. Bush was with Trump in 2005 on the set of Access Hollywood when the Republican nominee was heard bragging about his power over women, while he also detailed how he tried to seduce married woman, Nancy O'Dell. 'I moved on her and I failed. I’ll admit it. I did try and f*** her. She was married', Trump says in the recording obtained by the Washington Post. An NBC source told DailyMail.com Access Hollywood staff the controversial footage was uncovered as part of a story the program commissioned for next week, but they were beaten to the punch after someone leaked it.  '(The video) was in the process of being heavily vetted by Access Hollywood and NBC's attorneys,' the insider said. 'Unfortunately someone within NBC leaked the video in full beforehand to both embarrass Donald and Billy. 'NBC and Access Hollywood have absolutely no idea who released the video but it was most certainly leaked. The quality is perfect and it is previously unaired material.' The source went on to describe how Bush was not liked by some of the people he worked with on the show, before he made the jump to Today this year.  'While Billy was liked by some staff at Access Hollywood, he was a highly polarizing figure who at times acted like an entitled jock and this annoyed his colleagues,' they said. 'It's disgusting that he would let someone talk about his former colleague Nancy O'Dell in that way.' The network insider also said the 44-year-old host should 'resign from NBC News'.  'He can't stay on a show that's primary viewing audience is women when he has now been caught in a conversation that is offensive to women everywhere,' the source said. 'And if he doesn't resign, NBC needs to act immediately and fire him. Even if this was 11 years ago it speaks to his character or lack of character.'  'Billy has really done a great job on the third hour of Today since he joined. He's well liked by the team and not at all polarizing,' the second source said. 'These comments are from over 10 years ago and they don't represent the Billy we all work with today. 'Billy's job is not at risk.' Bush apologized for his role in the recording on Friday, saying in a statement: 'Obviously I'm embarrassed and ashamed. It's no excuse, but this happened eleven years ago - I was younger, less mature, and acted foolishly in playing along. I'm very sorry.'  He also swiftly deleted his Twitter account on Friday in the wake of the revelation, however his Facebook page that remained online was flooded with negative comments. 'Oh my Billy Bush you really surprise me with that conversation with "the Donald" I've lost a lot of respect for you!' Becky Bouldin wrote. 'Billy Bush! Just heard the Trump video in which you participated. Really???? You owe us something in the way of explanation... I'm so embarrassed by this and other happenings during this campaign,' Nancy Fuleihan said. 'Hey Billy Bush... you proud of yourself?' Ronald Wright asked.
'You are disgusting a pig as Trump': Billy Bush slammed on social media as former fans call for him to be fired from NBC
dailymail.co.uk

 

 20 /100 

Source: Trump attempted boardroom kiss (1.03/26)

A friend whom CNN anchor Erin Burnett has known for years recounted an experience she had with Trump in 2010 that echoes his words in the tape that surfaced Friday.
In March 2010, the woman -- who asked not to be identified -- met Trump in a boardroom in Trump Tower.
Another man -- a colleague of Burnett's friend -- was in the boardroom at the time of the incident.
The woman told Burnett: "Trump took Tic Tacs, suggested I take them also. He then leaned in, catching me off guard, and kissed me almost on lips. I was really freaked out. ... After (the meeting), Trump asked me to come into his office alone. Was really unsure what to do. ... Figured I could handle myself. Anyway, once in his office he kept telling me how special I am and gave me his cell, asked me to call him. I ran the hell out of there. "
The Trump campaign has not responded to a request for comment.
The alleged incident mirrors Trump's own words in the 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape. Trump was talking about actress Arianne Zucker, who was waiting to escort Trump to a soap-opera set on which he was about to tape a cameo appearance.
"I've gotta use some Tic Tacs, just in case I start kissing her," Trump said. "You know I'm automatically attracted to beautiful -- I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet. Just kiss. I don't even wait. And when you're a star they let you do it. You can do anything. "
The woman Burnett knows said Friday that hearing Trump's line about Tic Tacs in the 2005 tape "just made me sick. "
The other man who was in the boardroom in Trump Tower confirms the alleged 2010 exchange between Trump and the woman occurred.
Trump was married to Melania Trump at the time of the alleged 2010 incident.
Trump attempted to fire Nancy O’Dell 2 years after he ‘tried to f–k’ her
pagesix.com

 

 21 /100 

Pierce Brosnan's James Bond style ad causes uproar in India (1.02/26)

Pierce Brosnan has come under fire for appearing in an Indian advertisement in which he promotes a product commonly associated with a highly addictive form of chewing tobacco known for its addictive psychotropic effects.
The former James Bond actor fronts a new campaign for Pan Bahar mouth freshener which includes a 60 second 007-style ad in which Brosnan takes down a series of combatants, crosses paths with a woman spy and comes face-to-face with a leading antagonist.
The product featured in the ad is a traditional Indian breath freshener- known as "pan masala" or "gutka" in Hindi- and is comprised of a number of natural ingredients such as nuts, seeds, herbs and spices.
However pan masala has something of an unsavoury reputation in India because it became renowned for the presence of tobacco and the fact that it is chewed and subsequently expectorated in bright red streams.
Although the product Brosnan is endorsing does not contain either pan masala or gutka, the public misconception towards the product remains strong and has resulted in a widely negative perception.
Ashok & co, the company that produces Pan Bahar, said: " We are the oldest brand of mouth freshener in India and we don't produce either gutka or pan masala. But after the 1990s when gutka flooded the market, all mouth freshener products also got a bad name," a spokesman for the company said.
"We are trying to change that perception and this is a first step. "
The spokesman added that the company had thought Brosnan was "perfect" to endorse their product because he was "suave, cool and a master-blender" - all qualities they want people to associate with Pan Bahar.
Daniel Craig hints he might be on board for more James Bond films
dailymail.co.uk

 

 22 /100 

Review: 'The Birth of a Nation' is fiery, but flawed historical fiction (1.02/26)

"The Birth of a Nation" is most audacious in its title. Translating the story of historical figure Nat Turner, who led a revolt of African-American slaves against their masters, director/screenwriter/actor Nate Parker attempts to wrestle those five words away from D. W. Griffith's 1915 film romanticizing the Ku Klux Klan. It isn't appropriation by Parker. It's an attempt at hostile takeover, a cinematic revolt inspired by his subject.
In Parker's movie, Turner, a self-proclaimed prophet, interprets a solar eclipse as a sign from God, the catalyst for him to answer brutal savagery with the same – an eye for an eye. He will return these men to a vengeful God to reap His judgement. Whether the work will eclipse Griffith's remains to be seen; it certainly deserves to, at least in its intent. Griffith's film is an axe with two blades, influential in its technique, but unfortunately influential in its revolting message, which reinvigorated the Klan's standing in America.
This new "Birth" is ultimately an emotional argument. Its rationalities, its technique, are its weaknesses – the heavy-handed employment of symbolism, simplification of character and amateurish visual flourishes. Although there's a vitality to the context of the film's release, now being a time of heated racial conflict in American, it suffers within its artistic medium, which unavoidably begs comparison to 2013's "12 Years a Slave," director Steve McQueen's Oscar winner.
McQueen told an intimate story of one man, of status and wealth, swept into a deplorable institution, suffering unimaginable horrors and bearing great guilt for having escaped it. Any realistic depiction of slavery in the U. S. inevitably will terrify us with scenes of violence and suffering, and both McQueen and Parker are unflinching in their depiction of torture. The difference is in tone – Parker's graphic displays of abuse recall Mel Gibson's directorial work, which skirts the edge of exploitation and wide-eyed fetishism. When Turner is whipped for his insubordination, it recalls "The Passion of the Christ" both visually and thematically; when he leads a group of ragtag slaves, armed with knives and sledges, into a gory skirmish, it brings to mind William Wallace charging into battle. (It's no surprise to learn that "Braveheart" is Turner's favorite movie.)
Review: 'Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children' a derivative Tim Burton dud
Hence, why Parker sidesteps some comparison to McQueen. He tells a larger story, mythologizing Turner as an inspiration for black men to fight for the North. Parker plays Turner with warmth and compassion, a loving son, grandson, husband and father spurred to fulfill his grand spiritual purpose on Earth by the brutal violation of his wife, Cherry (Aja Naomi King). (Muddying the film's external contextual waters is Parker's acquittal on a rape charge in 1999, which makes this particular fictional flourish – among many instances of historical deviation – troubling. But I assert that an artwork is free of its creator when it's released for public consumption, and should be judged on its own merits.)
As a child, Turner is singled out by the master's wife, Elizabeth (Penelope Ann Miller), for his ability to read, and there's no explanation for his acquisition of this skill – it's apparently a skill appointed by a divine hand, considering Turner's life among illiterate slaves. "You've got purpose," Turner's father says, the last words he says to his boy before he flees a lynching party, pursuing him for stealing food.
Elizabeth pushes him away from literature – he wouldn't understand it; it's for white folk – towards the bible. She beams as he reads in church, sandwiched between a barely tolerant white congregation and a painted portrait of a pale-skinned Jesus. As an adult, he preaches to fellow slaves in a dim, clapboard church. His skills as an orator don't go unnoticed. His master, Samuel (Armie Hammer), follows the advice of the white Reverend Zalthall (Mark Boone Junior), and profits on the prophet, peddling him to fellow plantation owners to preach to slaves, and, theoretically, calm any unrest.
On their travels, Samuel and Nat witness the abhorrent actions of other white men on their black captives. Samuel is a relatively kind master, purchasing Cherry from an auction at Nat's urging, rescuing her from an implied life of sexual subjugation. When Samuel is forced to uphold the rules of superiority in white society, and therefore maintain his family's name, he hides his moral conflict inside a booze bottle. Nat gently courts Cherry in a few hackneyed scenes: Nat breaches the silence between them with a flower bouquet, Parker conveying nervousness with a hard swallow and fidgety feet, like a sitcom teenager asking the popular girl to the prom. Their wedding night is staged with corny violin swells and the light of a single candle, perched in the window between them as they sit, naked, staring at each other with a weirdly passionless sterility, an instance of Parker's unnecessary stylistic overstatement.
And yet, there's enough passion in Parker's film to render it engrossing, at least on the simplistic level of a revenge story. He paints evil in broad strokes: Jackie Earle Haley plays the cruel, sneering, one-dimensional villain, Raymond Cobb, who not only leads the chase for Nat's father, but initiates Cherry's suffering. Parker makes a point to place buzzing flies on the soundtrack when Reverend Zalthall speaks, implying moral rot within the white church. The filmmaker is best at nurturing a simmering tension throughout the narrative, where the safety of Turner and his family is ever-precarious. It will take the actions of Nat himself, not his keepers, to break that tenuousness. This swelling of furious emotion solidifies the film as a story worth telling, to be consumed and appreciated once, and probably never again. Such is its undeniable intensity.
Review: 'Queen of Katwe' an exceptional, deeply authentic underdog drama
Movie review: 'Snowden' shows a kinder, gentler, but sometimes stronger Oliver Stone
Readers weigh in on the first presidential debate and the history of 'The Birth of a Nation'
latimes.com

 

 23 /100 

With Only Bad Options in Syria, US Reluctant to Alter Course (1.02/26)

The disintegration of diplomatic talks with Russia has left the Obama administration with an array of bad options for what to do next in Syria.
Despite harrowing scenes of violence in Aleppo and beyond, President Barack Obama is unlikely to approve any dramatic shift in strategy before handing the civil war over to his successor early next year.
The options under discussion at the White House — limited military strikes, sanctions, more weapons for rebels, multi-party talks — have one thing in common: None appears likely to halt the bloodshed in the short-term. The more aggressive proposals come with the added risk of pulling the U. S. into direct military confrontation with Russia, a threat illuminated by a string of recent taunts from Moscow.
Obama has wrestled for years with the Syria crisis and is deeply reluctant to entangle the U. S. in another Mideast war. After insisting the only viable path forward was U. S.-Russia-brokered talks that have since fallen apart, Obama faces the prospect of leaving office as a bystander to a carnage that has killed an estimated 500,000 people and created 11 million refugees — half of Syria's pre-war population.
"Obama's practically lame-duck status only reinforces the argument for maintaining the current policy," said Jonathan Stevenson, a former senior Mideast adviser to the president. "It's true, of course, that presidents on their way out are not always risk-averse, but maybe they should be. "
Proponents of a more muscular U. S. approach, including Secretary of State John Kerry , are clamoring for a stronger response after the Syrian and Russian assaults on Aleppo punctured the veneer of a productive diplomatic track, and the U. S. withdrew from talks with Russia last week.
Evidence of the collapse of relations abounded Friday. The U. S. formally accused Russia of trying to meddle in the U. S. election by hacking U. S. political groups, and Kerry accused the Kremlin of war crimes in Syria. Russia, meanwhile, has suspended deals with the U. S. on nuclear research cooperation and disposal of weapons-grade plutonium.
The turn of events has led the White House to cautiously reconsider proposals that had been largely ruled out, including economic sanctions on Russia that the U. S. would have to orchestrate with Russia's larger trading partners. Senior U. S. officials said the administration was discussing options with European countries while U. S. intelligence agencies map out companies and individuals that could be targeted.
Under another proposal, the U. S. would take narrow, short-term military action against Syrian President Bashar Assad's military, such as its air force assets, officials said. The goal wouldn't be to eliminate Assad's ability to attack opposition groups, but rather to scare Syria and Russia into returning to the negotiating table, said the officials, who weren't authorized to speak publicly about internal deliberations and requested anonymity.
Yet officials from multiple U. S. agencies said chances appeared slim that Obama would approve the strikes. Such a move would likely trigger at least a short-term uptick in violence, they noted, with long-term prospects for starting a peace process unclear.
Moreover, there is no U. N. Security Council resolution authorizing strikes against Syria, leaving the U. S. without a clear legal basis to act. Russia, meanwhile, has beefed up its capabilities in Syria with state-of-the-art S-300 missile defense systems, while warning it could fire back if Assad's assets come under U. S. attack.
Russia launched its military campaign in Syria last year to help Assad's forces fight the opposition. The U. S. military and its partners are only targeting the Islamic State group and other extremists in the country.
Even with diplomatic talks ended, Russia and the U. S. are maintaining military-to-military "de-confliction" contacts to prevent an accidental confrontation in Syria's crowded skies. But Russia's military warned ominously this week that it wouldn't have enough time to use the "hotline" before shooting back.
"Both parties will try to avoid any sort of escalation that may entail unpredictable consequences, but various things may happen," said Fyodor Lukyanov, the head of Council for Foreign and Defense Policies, an association of top Russian political experts. "The risks are high, especially now when mutual aversion is strong. "
In sanctions, too, the U. S. sees potential drawbacks.
The U. S. had blamed Moscow of being either unable or unwilling to persuade Assad to abide by the most recent cease-fire. But it is holding out hope that Moscow has a change of heart — perhaps in response to sanctions.
The White House and State Department had argued to Congress that new sanctions legislation could undermine efforts with Russians to forge a cease-fire between Assad and rebel groups. Lawmakers responded last month by canceling a vote on a bipartisan bill requiring Obama to impose sanctions on anyone who does business with Syria's government or central bank, its aviation industry or energy sector.
While the Russia talks have collapsed, the administration maintains concerns about the sanctions might also hurt Iran, another Assad supporter, giving Tehran an excuse to renege on the U. S.-brokered nuclear deal. The administration also demanded that lawmakers strip out mandatory requirements so that Obama can waive sanctions at his discretion, congressional aides said.
The U. S. already has legal authority to target Russian entities over support for Syria, but there have been no Russia sanctions to date for its actions in Syria. The White House has argued that because the U. S. does little trade with Russia, U. S. sanctions would be ineffective unless European countries join.
The administration also has long considered allowing Saudi Arabia and other Assad opponents to arm the Syrian opposition with more sophisticated weaponry. But there's widespread concern about weapons reaching extremists, given intermingling across Syria's battlefields by various groups fighting Assad.
That leaves renewed diplomacy, through the U. N. or the 20-nation International Syria Support Group, as the most probable focus. Both formats include Russia.
———
AP National Security Writer Robert Burns in Washington and Associated Press writer Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow contributed to this report.
With only bad options in Syria, US reluctant to alter course
mynorthwest.com

 

 24 /100 

Verizon offering unlimited text, talk, data for areas affected by Hurricane Matthew (1.02/26)

Hurricane Matthew is still churning off the East Coast, with South Carolina next up in its path.
As the system continues to produce high winds and dump heavy rain, cell service provider Verizon Wireless is providing unlimited domestic talk, text and data to qualified customers in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina between Oct. 7 to 11. 
The company made the announcement on their website , saying it was offering the services "so you can stay connected when it matters most. "
Here are the qualified counties for each state:
Brevard Clay Duval Flagler Indian River Martin Nassau Palm Beach Saint Johns Saint Lucie Volusia Putnam Seminole Osceola Okeechobee
Brantley Bryan Camden Chatham Effingham Glynn Liberty Long Mcintosh Wayne
Beaufort Berkeley Charleston Colleton Dillon Dorchester Florence Georgetown Hampton Horry Jasper Marion Williamsburg
Brunswick Columbus New Hanover Pender
(© 2016 WXIA)
WXIA
Matthew moving closer to Georgia coast
WXIA
Hurricane Matthew storm surge a threat as it moves up coast: What we know now
WXIA
Myrtle Beach bracing for Hurricane Matthew's impact
WXIA
Football games affected by Hurricane Matthew
The Latest: Streets impassable, power out to 72,000
washingtontimes.com

 

 25 /100 

Novartis challenges Pfizer with strong breast cancer drug data (1.01/26)

By Ben Hirschler COPENHAGEN, Oct 8 (Reuters) - An experimental Novartis pill given with an older drug kept advanced breast cancer in check far longer than standard treatment alone, putting it on track to challenge Pfizer's blockbuster Ibrance, data showed on Saturday. Patients taking ribociclib with letrozole were 44 percent less likely to see their disease progress or to die, a keenly awaited clinical trial found. Novartis' ribociclib works in a similar way to Ibrance and is set to be second to market in the category. It is expected to go on sale next year, ahead of Eli Lilly's rival abemaciclib. Ibrance has been quickly adopted by oncologists and is tipped by analysts to sell some $2.1 billion in 2016, according to Thomson Reuters consensus forecasts. The 44 percent reduction in progression-free survival seen with ribociclib, which is also known as LEE011, compared with a 42 percent fall reported in a comparable late-stage trial involving Ibrance. Lead researcher Gabriel Hortobagyi of the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston said the two drugs appeared very similar both in terms of their efficacy and side effects. "This is a practice-changing study and when it (ribociclib) is approved by the appropriate regulatory agencies it will be one of the major choices," he told reporters. The news may prompt industry analysts to increase sales forecasts for the drug. Currently, consensus forecasts for ribociclib are $1 billion in 2021 against $5.8 billion for Ibrance. Alessandro Riva, head of cancer drug development at Novartis, told Reuters he believed the data showed that ribociclib was "at least as good" as Ibrance. Like Ibrance, ribociclib caused a decline in white blood cells. The Novartis drug was also associated with signals of potential liver and heart problems, although these issues were well managed. "The addition of ribociclib to letrozole does increase the rate of toxicity, but overall, if we evaluate the magnitude of clinical benefit, there is definitely a benefit to be gained from adding ribociclib," said Giuseppe Curigliano of the European Institute of Oncology. Novartis announced in May that the 668-patient trial was a success but full details were only unveiled in Copenhagen at the annual European Society for Medical Oncology congress. They were also published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. Patients on letrozole alone went a median 14.7 months before their disease progressed, while the median point was not reached in the ribociclib combination arm because so many of those patients remained healthy. The number of deaths in the study was also too low to allow researchers to calculate an impact on overall survival. In August, Novartis won breakthrough therapy designation from U. S. regulators for ribociclib as a first-line treatment for advanced breast cancer and the company plans to file the medicine for approval worldwide this year. Like Pfizer's Ibrance, which has a U. S. list price of around $10,000 a month, ribociclib blocks enzymes known as cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6. Both drugs are designed for patients whose tumours grow in response to oestrogen and whose cancer is not caused by the HER2 protein. This is the most common type of breast cancer. (Editing by Susan Thomas and John Stonestreet)
Tesaro's ovarian cancer drug benefits all patients in study
dailymail.co.uk
Tesaro ovarian cancer drug shows broad benefits in study
dailymail.co.uk

 

 26 /100 

Pak's ISI chief likely to be replaced: report (1.00/26)

Islamabad, Oct 8: Chief of Pakistan's powerful spy agency ISI Lt Gen Rizwan Akhtar is likely to be replaced within the next few weeks, a media report said today. Akhtar was appointed the director general of Inter- Services Intelligence (ISI) in...
Pak's Spy Agency ISI Chief Likely To Be Replaced: Report
article.wn.com

 

 27 /100 

Grigor Dimitrov jolts Rafael Nadal to reach semis in China (1.00/26)

Grigor Dimitrov upset Rafael Nadal for the first time in his career on Friday to advance to the semifinals of the China Open in Beijing.
Dimitrov rolled to a 6-2, 6-4 victory over the second-seeded Nadal to end a seven-match losing streak to the Spaniard. It marks the third Top-10 victory for the Bulgarian this season.
"I'm pretty happy with that win," Dimitrov said. "I'm not going to lie. I've played Rafa quite a few times. So many times I was close or a couple of times I was cramping. There was just always something happening. Today, I just played an excellent match. Simple as that. I'm proud. A lot of the work is paying off. "
Nadal was displeased with his early exit but was aware that he was outplayed.
"It's obvious that Grigor played much better than me and he deserved to win. Losing five-serve games is something you can't do to win a match like this," Nadal said. "I fought until the last ball, but was going against psychologically bad feelings because I was suffering with my serve. When that happens, you have to go to the next tournament because you don't deserve to win like this. "
Dimitrov next faces third-seeded Milos Raonic of Canada. Raonic was a 6-4, 6-4 winner over Spain's Pablo Carreno Busta.
Top-seeded Andy Murray reached the semifinals with a 7-6 (9), 6-2 victory over fellow Englishman Kyle Edmund. Murray will face Spain's David Ferrer. The fifth-seeded Ferrer was a 6-7 (4), 6-1, 7-5 winner over Germany's Alexander Zverev.
Murray prevailed in a tightly contested tiebreaker in the first set and then controlled the set while finishing off Edmund.
"I know how good he is and the power that he has on the court," Murray said. "I knew it was going to be a hard match today, he'd come though qualifying here and had a good win in the last round. He's playing really well and will be up at the top of the game soon.
"The first set was very tough and I was down an early break in the second. He generates a lot of power on the forehand side, it's one of the bigger weapons in tennis just now and that will continue to develop over the next few years the more matches he plays. "
Murray's semifinal opponent, Ferrer, is looking to reach his first final since of the year. Ferrer has lost six consecutive matches against Murray.
Raonic is bouncing back strong from a recent stretch of second-round defeats, including at the U. S. Open.
Japan Open
David Goffin was manhandled in the opening set before reversing course and rallying to dispatch Portugal's Joao Sousa 1-6, 7-5, 6-2 to reach the semifinals of the Japan Open at Tokyo.
The fifth-seeded Goffin of Belgium will face fourth-seeded Marin Cilic of Croatia in the semis. Cilic defeated Argentina's Juan Monaco 7-5, 6-1.
Goffin and Cilic are meeting for just the third time. Goffin won both meetings -- at Indian Wells early this year and in a Davis Cup match between Belgium and Croatia.
"That was when I played my best tennis this year," Goffin said. "I can play fast against him and he doesn't like that, because he's a big guy and he doesn't like to run. If I'm returning well, he struggles a bit. "
Also reaching the semifinals were Australian Nick Kyrgios and France's Gael Monfils. The sixth-seeded Kyrgios swept Luxembourg's Gilles Muller 6-4, 6-2 while the second-seeded Monfils outlasted Croatia's Ivo Karlovic 7-6 (6), 7-6 (6).
"It's always difficult to play Ivo, there aren't many opportunities," Monfils said. "A bit like today, I'm going to have to be patient tomorrow. "
Madison Keys knocks off Petra Kvitova in China Open
upi.com

 

 28 /100 

Rosberg quickest as rivals get road rage at Japanese Grand Prix (0.14/26)

Nico Rosberg posted the quickest time in Saturday's final free practice ahead of a frustrated Lewis Hamilton as Mercedes flexed their muscles for Japanese qualifying. The German, who has a 23-point lead over Hamilton in the Formula One championship with five races to go, clocked one minute 32.092 seconds under menacingly dark clouds in Suzuka as his British foe was scuppered by heavy traffic. Hamilton slipped to seventh while Red Bull's Daniel Ricciardo, who inherited victory last weekend after the Briton's engine caught fire, was second quickest, three 10ths adrift of Rosberg's time. Sebastian Vettel was third fastest, ahead of the second Red Bull of Max Verstappen and Ferrari team-mate Kimi Raikkonen. Rosberg has never won the Japanese Grand Prix but has been quickest so far all weekend, compounding Hamilton's problems after the triple world champion was robbed of victory in Malaysia last Sunday by an engine fire. Hamilton, who will be chasing a hat-trick of Suzuka wins on Sunday, has been criticised since then after hinting that he may have been the victim of sabotage by his Mercedes team. He was feeling the heat again in FP3, complaining that one side of his car felt hot before completing his flying lap. Meanwhile, tempers frayed as frustrated drivers got held up by traffic late in the session. Raikkonen got hot and bothered in a classic case of road rage after being held up by Kevin Magnussen's dawdling Renault, fuming over the radio: "That fucking Renault was in the middle of the road! " Verstappen also swore as he tried to weave around slower cars, barking: "Cars everywhere, what the fuck! " Rosberg, looking for his fourth win in five races this weekend, looks the man to beat but will be mindful that he squandered pole position here last year after a dashing move from Hamilton at the first corner. Hamilton, whose focus has been called into question this week, is reverting to the engine he used in Singapore this weekend after his third power unit failure of the year in Malaysia.
Motor racing-Formula One Japanese Grand Prix qualifying
dailymail.co.uk
Motor racing-Formula One Japanese Grand Prix qualifying session 2
dailymail.co.uk
Nico Rosberg snatches Japanese Grand Prix pole by narrow margin from Lewis Hamilton at Suzuka
dailymail.co.uk
Motor racing-Rosberg secures pole for Japanese Grand Prix
dailymail.co.uk
Motor racing-Formula One Japanese Grand Prix qualifying session 1
dailymail.co.uk
Motor racing-Formula One Japanese Grand Prix starting grid
dailymail.co.uk
Nico Rosberg dominates final practice for Japanese Grand Prix with Lewis Hamilton down in seventh
dailymail.co.uk
Motor racing-Formula One Japanese Grand Prix 3rd and final free practice session
dailymail.co.uk

 

 29 /100 

India 75 for two at lunch in Indore test (0.03/26)

INDORE, India, Oct 8 (Reuters) - India lost both their openers to reach 75 for two at lunch on the opening day of the third and final test against New Zealand on Saturday. Cheteshwar Pujara was on 29 with skipper Virat Kohli (seven) at the other end. The hosts, 2-0 up in the series, are looking for a clean sweep against New Zealand who yet again face the daunting task of batting in the fourth innings against India's spinners. Kohli maintained his perfect toss record in the series and had little hesitation in batting first at Indore's Holkar stadium, which is hosting its first test. The numerous cracks on the day one track encouraged New Zealand captain Kane Williamson, back in the squad after missing the second test with illness, to introduce spin as early as the fifth over and the decision immediately paid off. Jeetan Patel struck with his fifth delivery when Murali Vijay (10) stepped out to flick the off-spinner and Tom Latham did not flinch and took a sharp catch at short leg. It took injuries to openers Lokesh Rahul and Shikhar Dhawan to facilitate Gambhir's return to test cricket after a two-year gap and the left hander looked determined to make it count. Gambhir opened his account with a punch through the off side for a boundary and nonchalantly pulled successive Matt Henry deliveries for six to signal his intent. New Zealand attacked with spin from both ends for a while but it was pace bowler Trent Boult who struck the next blow with a good length delivery that nipped back and kept low to trap Gambhir in front for a fluent 29 that included three boundaries. Pujara, whose last four innings in the series includes three fifties, hit four boundaries in his confident knock. (Reporting by Amlan Chakraborty in New Delhi; editing by Greg Stutchbury)
Test Series India v New Zealand scoreboard
dailymail.co.uk
India bat first against New Zealand in 3rd Test
dailymail.co.uk
India elects to bat in 3rd test vs. New Zealand
dailymail.co.uk

 

 30 /100 

Olympia Valance and boyfriend Greg Cannell attend Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne (0.02/26)

She's the Neighbours star known for her effortlessly chic style.
And Olympia Valance was once again leading the style stakes at Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne on Saturday.
The 23-year-old dazzled in in a red lace dress while enjoying the festivities with her on-again off-again boyfriend Greg Cannell.
She flashed plenty of flesh in her revealing Thurley frock and accessorised with a gold Suzy O'Rourke headpiece.
Olympia finished off her race day style with large hoop Christien Nicolaides earrings, beige heels and a nude white slip.
She also carried around a gold Olgaberg clutch and styled her brunette hair back in a tight sleek bun.
The half-sister of actress Holly Candy kept her make-up simple with a nude lip, and a subtle smokey eye.
Her handsome boyfriend looked dapper in a navy pin-striped suit with a white shirt and brown lace-up shoes.
Olympia and Greg previously confirmed their split in February after dating for 15 months.
At the time, Olympia issued a statement on social media, saying: 'Just a quick note from me - sadly Greg and I have separated.'
But just two months later, she began posting photos of the pair on Snapchat, sparking rumours of a reunion.
And it would seem from their latest public appearance that the couple are still very much together.
Meanwhile, other celebrities in the David Jones Marquee included AFL WAG Nadia Bartel and model Elyse Knowles.
Elyse Knowles swaps her bikini style for a quirky outfit at Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne
dailymail.co.uk
Nadia Bartel shows off slim frame in a Dion Lee dress at Caulfield Guineas Day in Melbourne
dailymail.co.uk

 

 31 /100 

Christie Brinkley heads to the Hamptons International Film Festival in youthful appearance (0.01/26)

She may be 62 years old but she could easily pass as a being half that age. And Christie Brinkley showed off her remarkably youthful appearance as she headed to the Hamptons International Film Festival on Friday. The model put on a chic appearance in a sailor-inspired ensemble, working casual chic. Scroll down for video Making the most of the autumnal sunshine, she wore a nautical wide-cut sweater unbuttoned at the neckline to show off her tanned shoulder. Continuing her casual theme she teamed the monochrome top with a pair of tight-fitting leggings featuring a thigh-high rubber panel. And accessorising with a stylish baker boy hat, she wore her glossy blonde locks loose around her shoulders. Completing her look with casual trainers and a large holdall bag, she appeared to chew on a toothpick. And showing off her stunning complexion and model bone structure, she added a touch of blusher and lipgloss. Paying attention to detail she rocked a deep red manicure to finish off her polished get-up. The veteran supermodel, who was discovered at the age of 18, has been blessed with exceptional genes to be sure, but maintaining her ageless complexion has not been a totally effortless venture. In the latest issue of NewBeauty, Christie owned up to using Botox, but explained it's something she's wary of doing too much of. Christie Brinkley has had Botox - but it hasn't become a habit. 'I actually started to feel depressed,' she told the magazine. 'My face lacked expression. I will never do it again in my forehead.' She is a fan, however, of 'miraculous' skin texture-improving laser treatments and fillers in 'super tiny doses'. 'If you want to look refreshed, it has to be with a light hand. It’s one of the biggest mistakes when people deliberately go for that 'done' appearance - to each his own, obviously, but that’s not good,' she said.
Hilaria and Alec Baldwin enjoy quality time away from the kids at Hamptons International Film Festival
dailymail.co.uk

 

 32 /100 

Review: Jean-Michel Jarre brings Electronica to the O2 (Includes first-hand account) (0.01/26)

London - The Frenchman, the Godfather of Electronic Music, stopped off at the large London venue in Greenwich as part of an eight-date nationwide arena tour. Digital Journal was there. Raised up on a platform behind his keyboard and other equipment, the well-preserved 68 year old was flanked by two other musicians who played a variety of instruments, including the drums simultaneously, and provided backing vocals. The light show, as ever, was imaginative and well presented. "I'm probably the only Frenchman who understands cricket and likes it," he continued. Making a reference to his rain-soaked outdoor event at the nearby "Heart of Noise," the opening track on Electronica 2: The Heart of Noise and "Automatic (Part 2)," a duet with I felt the whole row of seats start to shake as people bobbed up and down energetically to "Circus" (a storming duet with Berlin-based artist Siriusmo) off Electronica 2. Edward Snowdon was praised ("We need more people like him," said Jarre) and appeared on a giant video screen during the pair's recent collaboration, " " Just as the proceedings were starting to flag a little, Jarre brought many in the venue to their feet - there was also a sudden increase in the number of camera phones being held up - with "Oxygène 4," probably his best known piece. " The last song in the main set saw Jarre tackle the laser harp (an act he described as "one of the tricky moments of the evening") on " Coming back out for the encore, the innovative musician spoke about his forthcoming album, Oxygène 3, set for release in December and timed to mark 40 years since the very first Oxygène LP. "It's funny as we're in the O2," he remarked, referring to oxygen's chemical symbol. The track played off it was " Having started around 8:35, the show was winding up around 22:10, I believe to give people the chance to get home. "Trains run all night on the Jubilee Line," Jarre assured us. He gave us "one for the road," the final song of an outstanding concert, " "Stardust" is my favourite tune from the Electronica project and I also caught my last train home. Happy times. Known for his groundbreaking music and spectacular live shows, Jean-Michel Jarre is currently on tour in the UK for the first time in six years. "The UK is my second home, Brexit or no Brexit! " announced the superstar, who released the second part of his collaborative Electronica project earlier this year. Raised up on a platform behind his keyboard and other equipment, the well-preserved 68 year old was flanked by two other musicians who played a variety of instruments, including the drums simultaneously, and provided backing vocals. The light show, as ever, was imaginative and well presented. "I'm probably the only Frenchman who understands cricket and likes it," he continued. Making a reference to his rain-soaked outdoor event at the nearby Docklands in 1988, Jarre added: "We took the option of a roof this time! ""Heart of Noise," the opening track on Electronica 2: The Heart of Noise and "Automatic (Part 2)," a duet with Vince Clarke on last year's Electronica 1: The Time Machine, preceded the warm sentiments, while " Oxygène (Part II) ," off Jarre's seminal album Oxygène from 1976 was the first what you might call 'vintage' track of the evening. I felt the whole row of seats start to shake as people bobbed up and down energetically to "Circus" (a storming duet with Berlin-based artist Siriusmo) off Electronica 2. Edward Snowdon was praised ("We need more people like him," said Jarre) and appeared on a giant video screen during the pair's recent collaboration, " Exit. " Equinoxe 7 " was another older tune given an airing tonight, as was the trippy " Oxygène 8. " Jarre explained that he'd worked with a number of British artists on the Electronica albums, one of whom was the Pet shop Boys. The familiar voice of Neil Tennant was then heard as the song was played. Just as the proceedings were starting to flag a little, Jarre brought many in the venue to their feet - there was also a sudden increase in the number of camera phones being held up - with "Oxygène 4," probably his best known piece. " Equinoxe 4 " was also warmly received. The last song in the main set saw Jarre tackle the laser harp (an act he described as "one of the tricky moments of the evening") on " The Time Machine. "Coming back out for the encore, the innovative musician spoke about his forthcoming album, Oxygène 3, set for release in December and timed to mark 40 years since the very first Oxygène LP. "It's funny as we're in the O2," he remarked, referring to oxygen's chemical symbol. The track played off it was " Oxygène 17. "Having started around 8:35, the show was winding up around 22:10, I believe to give people the chance to get home. "Trains run all night on the Jubilee Line," Jarre assured us. He gave us "one for the road," the final song of an outstanding concert, " Stardust ," his sublime duet with Armin van Buuren "Stardust" is my favourite tune from the Electronica project and I also caught my last train home. Happy times.
Review: David Allen Buckner delivers on 'Forget the Past with You' single (Includes first-hand account)
digitaljournal.com

 

 33 /100 

VIDEO: Check out Wildhawk In San Francisco's Mission District (0.01/26)

ABC7 has partnered with 96.5 KOIT morning host Andrew Hart to bring you "Andrew's Appetite," your weekly inside look at some of the coolest places around the Bay Area. Who doesn't love a breakfast Negroni that tastes like chocolate and comes complete with mini dolphins cut out of orange peels? If that makes your heart happy, then Wildhawk in the Mission District is going to be your new favorite spot. Open seven days a week, Wildhawk has some of the most unique and multi-ingredient cocktails in the city, making for an awesome experience, every time. A beautiful wooden design makes for this library-feel cocktail lounge to be a Mission-favorite for years to come! Watch the video above to see Andrew's must-have item.
One man killed, another injured in shooting in San Francisco's Ingleside District
abc7news.com

 

 34 /100 

Samantha Armytage faces a backlash on social media after posing with a shackled tiger in Queensland

She's the bubbly host of Channel Seven's breakfast show Sunrise. But Sam Armytage faced a fan backlash on Friday after Instagram followers commented on her patting a chained tiger at Dreamworld. The 40-year-old TV star had shared a photo of herself stroking a chained tiger at the Gold Coast theme park. Scroll down for video  Sam wrote in the caption: '"Pat! " Someone yelled. So I did. Apparently that was the keeper's name'. In the photo, Sam was dressed in a beige coat while leaning over to touch the animal. But despite her good intentions, some of Sam's Instagram followers failed to see the funny side. One follower wrote: 'I couldn't think of anything worse for that beautiful animal than to be paraded through droves of noisy spectators all day on a chain'. Meanwhile, another simply commented: 'Cruel'. 'I don't like the look at that cruelty' (sic), a further post read. Sam visited the park for Sunrise to discuss a breeding program to help maintain the future of the species. She spoke to Dreamworld's Tiger Island manager Patrick Martin-Vegue, who said that with less than 3,000 tigers left, their facilities are crucial. 'It's very important in that it's an insurance population in case they go extinct in the wild,' he began. 'Secondly, these guys have a great impact on people to donate and create awareness about what is going on with tigers in the wild.'

 

 35 /100 

Docker Training- An Insight on the Best Application Deployment Tool

(Source: Cisco Systems Inc ) Cisco Blog > Cloud Cloud Vijay Sarathy - October 6, 2016 - 0 Comments Before diving into the core topic of this post, let me first quickly ...
BOSTON, Oct. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Xively by LogMeIn, Inc. (NASDAQ:LOGM) released the findings of a new study sponsored by LogMeIn and conducted by Harbor ...
(Source: Markets and Markets Limited ) The report 'Multi-Cloud Management Market by Application (Provisioning, Metering and Billing), Service Type (Cloud Automation, ...
(Source: LogMeIn Inc ) BOSTON, Oct. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today Xively by LogMeIn, Inc. (NASDAQ:LOGM) released the findings of a new study sponsored by LogMeIn and ...
(Source: NaviSite Inc ) We've spent two days here in Orlando at Commvault's first user conference, CommvaultGO. The conference's attendees included IT leaders, operations...
TEMPE, Ariz., Oct. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Insight (NASDAQ:NSIT) enhanced its website with a broader set of tools including a new configurable dashboard for clients to improve their experience and streamline IT lifecycle management. Forrester reports the number of B2B buyers expected to complete at least half of their work purchases online will nearly double from 30% in...
(Source: Air Watch LLC ) SysTrack Desktop Assessment Service Gives Customers a View Into Their Organization's Needs Before Upgrading to Windows 10 ATLANTA - Sept. 26, 2016 - Today at Microsoft Ignite 2016, VMware, Inc. (NYSE: VMW), a global leader in cloud infrastructure and business mobility, announced a new solution for customers to assess and implement their Windows 10 ...
(Source: The University of Texas at Arlington ) George Siemens, executive director of the LINK Lab Researchers and professors at The University of Texas at Arlington recently launched a Massive Online Open Course or MOOC to train educators on the practical application of emerging technologies like social media in K-12 teaching and learning. More than 3,100 participants from 139...
(Source: ANS - American Nuclear Society ) In anticipation of one of the largest hurricanes to hit the U. S. southeastern coast since Hurricane Wilma in 2005, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been working on training and preparing reactor staff in anticipation of Hurricane Matthew reaching the coastline this weekend. During this past week the staff at Florida Power and...
Productivity in the British workforce has returned to pre-financial crisis levels, but is still lagging behind other major economies, according to new data. Estimates for the second quarter show that output per hour grew by 0.6%, up from 0.5% in the first quarter, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said. Share Go To On average, output stood at 0.5% in the decade leading ...

 

 36 /100 

Saginaw native appears in two episodes of Marvel's Luke Cage on Netflix

SAGINAW, MI — Luke Cage, Marvel's black superhero who may have temporarily broke Netflix when its debut season was released on Sept. 30, has a Saginaw connection.
Brad Fraizer, a 2000 graduate of Saginaw Township's Heritage High School, appears in two of the season's later episodes.
Fraizer, who moved to New York in 2004 after earning a bachelor's degree in acting, said that it was a pretty cool experience being able to have a part in the series.
"All of the main players were there in the scene," he said. "It's pretty intense to walk onto a big set that has the money that Netflix and Marvel has. "
Fraizer plays an emergency medical technician at the end of Episode 11 and beginning of Episode 12.
"I have a few lines with Simone Missick who plays Misty Knight," he said. "She was very easy to work with. "
Heritage grad follows dream to stage
Fraizer begin his career in theater after graduating from the University of Michigan. He performed in plays for about 10 years before recently trying to break into TV acting.
He's had appearances on The Guiding Light the Showtime series Billions before Luke Cage came along. Recently, he said he learned that he booked a co-star spot on an episode of Law & Order SVU.
"Slowly but surely, I'm kind of breaking into this industry because it is very different than theater," he said.
Luke Cage controversy
A recent controversy of the Harlem-centered Luke Cage serious focused on its cast.
Social media users were quick to point out the predominantly black cast, with some calling it racist.
Fraizer said he has read the comments, rants and tweets about the show's cast.
"It's a joke to me," he said. "If you're going to cast a show that takes place in Harlem, you're not going to cast a bunch of white dudes. Daredevil took place in Hell's Kitchen, which was predominantly Irish but I don't see them tweeting about that cast.
"It's silly, sometimes, the way that people choose to voice their opinion on social media and it is stupid. "
Fraizer said that although he is a "white boy from the Midwest," he lived in Harlem for four years and found it to be "pretty cool. "
As for his acting career, Fraizer said that he will continue to seek more opportunities and that he is grateful for being a part of a show that apparently crashed Netflix when it was released.
"It's cool to be attached to something like this, even though I have only a small part," Fraizer said.

 

 37 /100 

Danny Mac's fiancée Carley Stenson moves to London 'to combat Strictly Curse'

They are all too aware of the so-called Strictly Curse where celebrities' relationships fall apart during the show. But Danny Mac and his fiancee Carley Stenson have apparently taken measures against it - by moving into a rented house in London for his time on the dance floor. Hollyoaks actress Carley, 34, has already had issues with the curse - when romance rumours surrounded her now-former flame Ricky Whittle and his dance partner Natalie Lowe back in 2009. So it's understandable that she may want to keep an eye on Danny, 28, as he spends time with dance partner Oti Mabuse, 26. The Hollyoaks hunk to told The Sun : 'I talk to Carley about any job and we decide what's good for us, about where we're going to live and how long for.  'Doing Strictly was a positive thing. We both live in London while I'm doing this. 'We've been together five years, we're engaged and past relationships don't really have an effect upon us, so we're just looking forward.' Danny revealed that he and Carley went for dinner with Oti Mabuse and her husband when it was announced they would be dancing together. The bookies' favourite also confessed that he's shy and even felt awkward when asked to flash his abs during the show's launch - despite the fact that his soap character Mark regularly gets his top off. Previous victims of the Strictly curse include Georgia May Foote who reportedly broke up with former Corrie co-star Sean Ward after dancing with Geovanni Pernice in 2015. Former rugby star Ben Cohen was married to Abby Blayney for 11 years when he went on the show and soon became engaged to dance partner Kristina Rihanoff. And countdown babe Rachel Riley split from her millionaire husband of 15 months Jamie Gilbert just after Strictly in 2013 where she danced with current boyfriend Pasha Kovalev.

 

 38 /100 

New in home entertainment: Extended cut of Paul Feig’s much-debated 'Ghostbusters' remake

“Ghostbusters: Answer the Call” (Sony DVD, $30.99; Blu-ray, $34.99; 4K/3D, $45.99; also available on VOD)
Paul Feig ’s much-debated “Ghostbusters” remake is now available on home video, in an extended cut with the subtitle “Answer the Call.” So perhaps now people can begin to appreciate what the film is, rather than what it represents. A good-natured, funny reimagining of an ‘80s comedy favorite, the 2016 “Ghostbusters” assembles excellent, eclectic comic actresses: the meek Kristen Wiig, the boisterous Melissa McCarthy , the forceful Leslie Jones , and the weirdo Kate McKinnon. The new movie has some of the same troubles as its predecessor, straining to integrate all the big special effects, mild horror shocks and smart-alecky jokes. But Feig and his co-writer Katie Dippold ultimately succeed by minimizing the “paranormal investigators save New York” plot and maximizing the bonding between four hilarious ladies.
[Special features: Over an hour of additional and alternate scenes, plus featurettes and commentary tracks]
“Blue Jay” (available 10/11)
Great acting, believable dialogue and tasteful direction enhance even the thinnest story, as evidenced by the indie drama “Blue Jay,” a wisp of a film that’s nevertheless a pleasure to watch for all of its 80 minutes. Sarah Paulson and Mark Duplass (the latter of whom also wrote the script) costar as high school sweethearts who run into each other in their old hometown and spend a day talking about what’s happened in their lives since they broke up 20 years ago. There’s barely enough material here for a short story, yet director Alex Lehmann’s elegant compositions — shot in soft black-and-white — make the movie look lovely. And Paulson and Duplass have rarely been better, playing two lost middle-aged souls remembering how alive they used to be.
“Hannibal: The Complete Series” (Lionsgate DVD, $39.98; Blu-ray, $39.97)
Though it only lasted for three seasons — for a total of 39 episodes — the TV adaptation of Thomas Harris’ Hannibal Lecter novels will go down as one of the great television achievements of the 2010s, bringing a florid, often gleefully grotesque visual style and genuinely subversive narrative content to the small screen. Producer/writer Bryan Fuller digs into the eerily similar mindsets of a serial killer and the FBI agent on his tail, turning their extended game of cat-and-mouse into a larger commentary on how some privileged people see every human being they encounter as either predator or prey. Add in the brilliant, committed performances of Mads Mikkelsen as Lecter and Hugh Danny as his nemesis, profiler Will Graham — plus A-list supporting players Raúl Esparza, Gillian Anderson, Laurence Fishburne, Michael Pitt, Eddie Izzard and more — and “Hannibal” earns its reputation as great theater as well as a one-of-a-kind spectacle.
[Special features: Commentary tracks, deleted scenes and extensive behind-the-scenes featurettes]
“McCabe & Mrs. Miller” (Criterion, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.95)
After scoring a surprise hit with the 1970 antiwar comedy “MASH,” director Robert Altman spent the next five years helming one good-to-great movie after another, reshaping classic Hollywood genre in his own cynical counterculture image. Altman’s melancholy 1971 western “McCabe & Mrs. Miller” is one of his masterpieces: the story of two unlikely entrepreneurs (Warren Beatty and Julie Christie) building up a Northwestern frontier town through gambling and prostitution, then seeing their dreams co-opted and crushed by the rise of American monopolies. The overlapping dialogue, dreamy Leonard Cohen score and hazy Vilmos Zsigmond cinematography combine to create a movie that comments on our complicated history, within the context of a beautifully tragic romance.
[Special features: Old and new interviews, plus a commentary track that Altman recorded in 2002]
“Blood Father” (Lionsgate DVD, $19.98; Blu-ray, $24.99; also available on VOD); “The Infiltrator” (Broad Green DVD, $29.99; Blu-ray, $34.99; also available on VOD); “The Legend of Tarzan” ( Warner Bros. DVD, $29.98; Blu-ray, $35.99; 4K; $39.99; 3D, $44.95; 4K, $44.95; also available on VOD)

 

 39 /100 

Parade of Homes builder spent months creating dry basement for this lakefront luxury home

CANNON TOWNSHIP, MI – When homebuilder Joel Peterson was hired to build a six-bedroom lakefront house on the eastern shore of Bostwick Lake, he had several limitations to overcome.
Building height restrictions, a small lot and a high water table limited Peterson's ability to build up, out or down around the popular inland lake half an hour northeast of Grand Rapids.
Peterson's shingle-style home at 6783 Sunset Cove is one of 40 new homes on display in the Home Builders Association of Greater Grand Rapids' 2016 Fall Parade of Homes.
The parade, which concludes on Oct. 22, features homes open for touring on Fridays and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. and on Wednesdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Remodeled homes will be open for touring on Oct. 21 and Oct. 22 from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.
"Essentially, we sunk the home into the water table," said Peterson on Thursday, Oct. 6, as workers scrambled to complete the house for the Parade of Homes' opening day on Friday, Oct. 7. "It was a very complex project. "
Using wells dug around the lakefront lot, they employed a de-watering process took three months before they could dig a basement and pour footings for the house, says Peterson. Then, they created a giant rubber bladder that encased the foundation, parts of which sit four feet below the water table, says Peterson.
Peterson said they also poured the basement floors extra thick as ballast so the house would not float on the water table. He also installed three redundant sump pumps and a generator in the house. "It's been dry for the past 10 months," he reports.
But none of that groundwork is apparent to visitors to the 8,600-square-foot home, which was designed by architect Wayne Visbeen and includes six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, a home theater and a basement workshop beneath the three-stall garage.
Although the home is listed for $1 million-plus on Parade of Homes literature, Peterson acknowledged that estimate is low. "I don't even want to say," he said with a chuckle.
Set on a 75-foot lakefront lot, the shingle style house greets visitors from a bluestone-paved patio that features a water fountain. The patio and driveway include a snow melt system.
The front door leads to a great room with white oak flooring that includes a living room and seating area, a gourmet kitchen with formal dining room that overlooks Bostwick Lake. Cottage blinds on the windows, alder wood ceilings and a stone fireplace give the big room an informal feel.
For warmer weather, a six-panel glass "Nana Wall" folds open and allows the owners to extend the great room into to a screened-in porch.
Behind the kitchen, there's a walk-through butler's pantry and pantry closet whose quartz counter tops and extra sink create more space for food preparation when entertaining.
The kitchen itself includes two refrigerators, two dishwashers, a Wolf gas range and oven, and a kitchen island topped by slab of natural quartz.
The main floor master suite has a cathedral-ceilinged sitting area that faces the lake. A hinged doubled door that collapses against the wall can be closed to offer privacy to the bedroom next door.
The ensuite bathroom features a marble floor with radiant heat and a cavernous no-step shower whose marble walls feature a variety of German-made shower heads and a strip drain in the marble flooring.
The main floor also includes a ground floor laundry, a home office and mudroom with an elevator that connects the home's three floors.
Upstairs, the home includes three guest suites, each with their own full bathrooms and walk-in closets. The upstairs also includes a hangout area for kids and a hallway that leads to a sixth bedroom above the three-stall garage.
Downstairs, there's a family room with a fireplace, a sound-proofed home theater with stadium seating for 12, a wine cellar, a workout room, a second home office and a workshop area beneath the garage whose concrete floor lies four feet beneath the water table.
The 40 Fall Parade of Homes can be found in the following communities: Ada, Allendale, Belmont, Byron Center, Caledonia, Grand Haven, Grand Rapids, Grandville, Hudsonville, Jenison, Jenison, Newaygo, Rockford, West Olive, Whitehall and Zeeland.
Tickets may be purchased for $12 at the homes or for $10 in advance at Adventure Credit Union locations, online at myGRhome.com and at HBAGGR Offices, 3959 Clay Ave SW, Wyoming.
RELATED: 40 new houses on display in Fall Parade of Homes
This is one in a series of articles we have published about High-End Homes in West Michigan. Here are similar articles we have published recently:
• East Grand Rapids couple retains mid-century modern style in major updating
• Log home on Grand River has bald eagle nesting next door
• For $2M, 102-year-old Leonard House has 10 bedrooms, 14 bathrooms
• $1.2M cube-shaped house in secluded setting inspired by Mies van der Rohe
• $3.2M luxury home along Lake Michigan offers 'turn-key' elegance
• $2.7M high-tech house boasts 'best view of Grand Traverse Bay you'll ever see'

 

 40 /100 

Ray Mears slams Bear Grylls' programmes for teaching audiences nothing

Survivalist Ray Mears has slammed the tips of rival Bear Grylls - claiming the adventurer is only interested in 'showmanship'. Mears, 52, revealed he does not watch the programmes of Grylls - which he labelled as 'entertainment' - as he likes to 'teach people how to do things properly'. Grylls' shows have been broadcast around the world and are well-known for their over-the-top theatrics, including eating live animals and drinking his own urine. But while speaking at The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival, Mears said he was 'not really interested' in what Grylls does. 'He does something completely different to me,' Mears added. 'It's become clear that what he does is showmanship. 'I'm not in that job. My job is to teach people how to do things properly.' Some of the Grylls' famous stunts include urinating into a snakeskin, using the corpse of a sheep as a sleeping bag, and eating deer droppings. Ray Mears' World of Survival premiered on British screens in 1997 and taught viewers a new survival skill in each episode, including how to make a fire to keep warm. Mears also slammed his rival in 2013, accused Grylls of setting a poor example for young viewers who might imitate his dangerous stunts. He said: 'Some of his stunts are crazy. Leaping off cliffs into water when you don’t know what’s in it. 'If a 15-year-old was to copy him and impale himself on a pram leaping into a canal. because they were inspired by it, I would think that was his fault.' Mears' renewed criticism comes as Grylls prepares to repackage his survival exploits into a new live show. The 42-year-old is set to condense his death-defying stunts into fully immersive stage productions. Endeavour: Your Adventure Awaits, will dramatise Bear's escapades in a spectacle with adventures so real, 'you can almost touch them'. Using state of the art video mapping technology and incredible special effects, the shows will celebrate 'some of the greatest feats of courage through the ages'. Starting from the SSE Arena in Wembley, London, the tour will then move onto cities across the UK including Liverpool, Leeds, Glasgow and Nottingham where audiences will, 'witness the heroism and adventure that have shaped our world'.

 

 41 /100 

James Norton wears clerical clothing during filming for Granchester's Christmas special

He's busy filming the third instalment of Grantchester. But James Norton took time out of his hectic filming schedule to greet his eager fans on Friday. Dressed in clerical clothing, the 31-year-old actor put in a dapper appearance as he posed for pictures with his followers on set in Cambridge. Scroll down for video  James and Robson Green were seen filming scenes on the snow-covered set, in deep conversation next to a 1950s car- reflecting the era it is based on. One scene saw Robson running through the street, in what appeared to be a particularly heavy snow flurry. Clad in a vintage style brown pinstripe suit, a camel overcoat and a top hat, Robson cut a smart figure. The stars were spotted sharing a laugh between takes as they chatted to each other and the show's crew. The show sees Sidney Chambers (James Norton) develop a sideline in investigation with the help of Detective Inspector Geordie Keating (Robson Green. It is based on collections of short stories written by James Runcie, with the first series was based on the six stories from the first book. Grantchester is a small-screen adaptation of crime-fiction book series The Grantchester Mysteries. First filmed in 2014, a second series was broadcast in March and April 2016 and a third series will air in 2017. The first series pulled in an average of 6.6 million viewers when it debuted in October 2014. The final episode of the last season saw Geordie shot on duty. A year on, he appears to have put it behind him but underneath his carefree exterior there are new feelings of vulnerability, and this puts a strain on his relationship with wife Cathy and his friendship with Sidney. The six new episodes are being filmed in London and Grantchester as well as in Cambridge's city centre. A 90 minute Christmas Special will also be broadcast later this year. Victoria Fea, ITV’s Controller of Drama, commented: 'Viewers have really taken Grantchester to their hearts. We’re really excited to commission not only a third series, but also a Christmas special. 'The village of Grantchester is always beautiful, but to add a festive touch will be absolutely wonderful!'.

 

 42 /100 

Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones take kids Dylan and Carys to Rolling Stones gig

They are one of the strongest couples in Hollywood despite their 25 year age difference. Although enjoying busy careers, Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones made sure to make time for each other as they enjoyed a family night out with their two children - Dylan, 16, and Carys, 13 - at Desert Trip Festival in California on Friday. Taking to Instagram to document their outing to watch the Rolling Stones, the 46-year-old Oscar winner shared the smiling snap of the foursome holding their tickets to her 354,000 followers. Scroll down for video Captioning the sweet pic, she wrote: 'So excited. Tickets ready. A Friday night with Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones!!! Can't breathe with excitement!!! A #DesertTrip of a lifetime!' Oscar winner Catherine looked stylish in a floral embellished halterneck maxi dress that showcased her toned arms and tiny waist. Complementing her ensemble, the Welsh beauty slipped on a pair of Adidas trainers as she popped an on-trend backpack as she posed alongside her look-a-like daughter and son. Meanwhile, renowned actor Michael kept it casual in a short sleeved blue linen shirt and black chinos as he highlighted he golden glow. Sharing another candid snap from the highly-anticipated gig, Catherine posted a pic with her mini-me daughter Carys. Enjoying some bonding time, she wrote alongside the pic: 'At the show tonight with my darling daughter Carys. #DesertTrip'. The teen, who is taking after her stunning mother, smiled alongside her mum in a white bardot top as both flashed their Rolling Stones VIP badges. Fellow A-list star Rob Lowe and wife Sheryl Berkoff also attended the gig, arriving at the Indio based event in a helicopter. Thrilled about the music event, the Parks And Recreation star shared his form of transport on picture sharing platform. He captioned the pic: 'Arrival! Let the games begin! #deserttrip #RollingStones'. The flood of Instagram snaps come as the Rolling Stones rocked out with the energy of much younger musicians at the Californian festival. Sporting an array of colourful ensembles, the band - Mick, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts, put on a lively performance, even giving fans a taster of their new album. Ticket sales for the Desert Trip festival went on sale with talk of seeing, in the words of The Who's Roger Daltrey, 'the greatest remains of an era' for one final time. With more than 150,000 people attending, the festival — which was two years in the making — was predicted to make at least £117 million in ticket sales, hospitality and merchandising. The performance comes after the Rolling Stones announced their first new album in ten years. They've been busy touring the globe for the past 12 months, performing everywhere from South America to Cuba. And somewhere in-between their manic schedule and their personal commitments, The Rolling Stones managed to find the time to record new album, Blue & Lonesome. The LP's name gives away what musical gems fans can expect to hear, as the legendary rockers' first studio effort in 10 years is all about blues music.

 

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Pittsburgh's thriving tech sector brings new life to post-industrial city

W hen Uber chose to test its robot-driven taxis in Pittsburgh, some may have wondered why the tech company had chosen America’s former capital of steel for its road test into the future. But for those in the know, Pennsylvania’s second city is well on its way to establishing itself as the Silicon Valley of the east – and even its roads are helping.
Unlike many American cities, Pittsburgh road system is literally off the grid, its origins dating back to twisty, pre-revolution forest trails. Then there are the city’s 446 bridges to navigate. More importantly Pittsburgh boasts the robotics department at Carnegie-Mellon University, recognized as the leading academic institution in the field.
It was here last month that Pittsburgh opened its doors to show the world why it is so well positioned to be a new tech hub. The city is now in a position to capitalize on the infrastructure of the past in ways that could not have been anticipated at the depths of its post-industrial depression two decades ago, when the city’s population was half its industry peak and the unemployment rate was worse than in Detroit.
Last week, the city hosted Thrival, a three-day showcase of panel discussions and exhibitions designed to show off the city’s post-industrial charms. From robotics to biotech, performing arts to healthcare, the city’s premier boosters – many locals or returning natives – sought to describe the city’s upswing.
The twin keys to the city’s current success, says the festival’s executive producer, Dan Law, are education and medicine – eds and meds – that helped bridge the gap between old industrial Pittsburgh and a new Pittsburgh that’s about innovation and technology. Now, instead of leaving, students from Pittsburgh’s tech university departments have more options to stay.
“Eds and meds are the bedrock of the economic transition,” says Law. “UPMC – University of Pittsburgh Medical Center – alone is a $13bn health system and there are dozens of ancillary industries that began to innovate. So young people started to get jobs here and economic growing around the core economic pillars.”
Correspondingly, the city’s arts and culture are thriving. “The City of Bridges is in the throes of a full-on nose-to-tail, barrel-aged, small-plates culinary renaissance,” according to Bon Appetit magazine. It rated one Spanish restaurant, Morcilla, the fourth best restaurant in the US. There’s a trendy Ace Hotel that was originally a YMCA and, of course, the Warhol Museum, dedicated to its most famous artist, and the Carnegie Museums of Art.
“At the centre of it all, Pittsburgh is becoming a diversified innovation economy,” say Luke Skurman, founder of Niche.com and one of the founders of Thrill Mill, a not-for-profit organization providing mentorship and collaborative workspace to early-stage startups. “When I graduated Carnegie Mellon and stayed, people thought I was bananas. Now it’s becoming fashionable to do so.”
Among the attendees at Thrival were Bennet Omalu, the Nigerian American neuropathologist who was the first to discover and publish findings of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in football players, and Jennifer Krusius, general manager at Uber.
The transportation firm has about 500 employees in the city’s tech Strip district and plans to start testing as many as 100 Volvo sport utility vehicles on the city’s streets. Many of Uber’s employees were hired directly from Carnegie-Mellon’s computer labs and the state’s approach to the technology – called greenlight governing – effectively encouraged investment in the field. Uber estimates its investment will reach $1bn over the next few years.
“It’s not just about self-driving cars,” says Law. “It’s about the future of urban mobility. How do you create smarter and more efficient cities.” Pittsburgh is ideal, he says, “because if you are going to design a car that needs to navigate some of the most complex road networks and systems, you’re not going to get a bigger challenge than here. It’s old, it was planned poorly, it’s built around hills and valleys, and the roads are windy and steep. If it works in Pittsburgh, it can work anywhere.”
The firm is not alone: General Motors, Google – which has centered its engineering facilities here and employs 600 – and Intel have also come to Pittsburgh. While Apple, which employs 500 here, has not stated the reason for its interest, it is known to have already developed a prototype vehicle. But the city’s easy-going regulatory approach and an intelligent workforce is not the only reason Pittsburgh is becoming ground zero for auto-automation, widely regarded as one of the largest untapped economies.
Google’s Mike Capsambelis explains the company’s explicit interest in Pittsburgh is machine learning, a sub-field of computer science that evolved from the study of pattern recognition and computational learning theory in artificial intelligence. In other words, learning without needing to be explicitly programmed.
“It’s uniquely a collaborative place. We tend to work together even when there’s actual competition,” says Capsambelis.
Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer at UPMC, says healthcare is a natural fit for machine learning. Healthcare, he says, is so muchabout billing and book-keeping. “We want to free the data, to empower patients and consumers to take charge of their own data with the right sets of systems,” says Shrestha.
“So the question is, how do we do a better job of precision medicine, not just do a better job of billing and documentation? The entrepreneurial knack is not just to create incremental innovation but to change the entire dynamic of healthcare innovation.”
Tech companies, including Google, eye healthcare’s copious resources of data – UPMC’s nine petabytes of data is doubling every 18 months – with some envy. And vice versa. Says Shrestha: “Let’s create solutions that leverage machine learning and big-data-type technologies to create products we can then commercialize.”
There may also be a natural symbiosis between healthcare advances and tech’s interest in transport. An ageing population suggests more will need assistance in terms of mobility. “There’s a ton of connections and overlap,” says Capsambelis. “A lot of people will still need cars, but there won’t be as many drivers.”
The spirit of entrepreneurship suffuses the robotics lab at Carnegie-Mellon. Not only has tech become a major employer of the university’s graduates, but much of the computational power that was once available only to universities or government laboratories is now available to research.
“Having machine learning has really changed the way we do research because the things we used to do at the university, companies can do much better because of their access to huge computing power and big data,” says professor of computer science Lenore Blum.
But the city and its promoters at Thrival and Thrill Mill are keen to show off the small entrepreneurs along with the grand-scale technology behemoths that are beginning to occupy the same psychic space in the culture that the robber barons Carnegie and Frick did here in the late 19th century.
An app for artists to find spaces, for instance, or a machine-learning ECG device for early stroke detection. Another involves cooking recipes for the sight-impaired. They may not or ever be Google or Uber but they are nonetheless imbibing Pittsburgh’s spirit of innovation. “It looks more like a continuum to us,” says Thrill Mill’s Stephan Mueller, “because we all have this fatal love for Pittsburgh and want to do something for it.”

 

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Mayaro Virus Is Another Little-Known, Mosquito-Borne Disease That Might Warrant More Attention : Goats and Soda : NPR

Emily Sohn
The Mayaro River in Trinidad. The Mayaro virus was first identified in forest workers on the island.
Jamieson Ramkissoon/Flickr
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When an 8-year old boy showed up at his school's clinic in rural Haiti with a low-grade fever and abdominal pain, he was told he had typhoid and given medicine to treat it.
But blood tests showed something else: Mayaro, a mosquito-borne virus that may now be circulating in the Caribbean.
The Haitian boy remains an isolated case.
Still, the new finding, reported in the November issue of a CDC journal, suggests the need for vigilance — along with more research into why viral epidemics seem to be happening with increasing frequency, says Glenn Morris , director of the Emerging Pathogen Institute at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Ebola, chikungunya and Zika have all emerged as sudden and serious threats to public health in recent years.
"We need to recognize that while Zika understandably has all the attention, it's not the first virus to move through in epidemic form, nor is it going to be the last," Morris says. Under the right conditions, he says, Mayaro could be next. "This may be yet another virus poised to start moving in epidemic form. "
The Mayaro virus was first identified in forest workers in Mayaro, Trinidad, in 1954 and has since caused small outbreaks in South America. It shows up most often in Brazil near the Amazon, where it is spread by a tree-dwelling species of mosquito that feeds mostly on monkeys, says Robert Tesh , professor of pathology at the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.
A close relative of the chikungunya virus, Mayaro causes similar symptoms, including fever, joint pain and muscle aches that be crippling for several weeks. Because Mayaro's symptoms can resemble those of both chikungunya and dengue, the new study suggests, it may be underdiagnosed.
Morris' group didn't set out to look for Mayaro. Instead, for the last several years, the team has been studying waves of viruses that pass through schoolchildren in rural Haiti.
Traditionally, Morris says, clinicians in Haiti assume that any kid who has a fever with no other obvious cause must have malaria or typhoid. But when the team ran diagnostic tests on sick kids, they identified malaria in only five percent and typhoid in another five percent.
To find out what else might be causing the fevers, the researchers started taking blood samples from feverish kids and placing extracted plasma on tissue cultures, then allowing whatever viruses might be present in the blood to grow. The project revealed plenty of dengue fever. It also documented epidemics of chikungunya and Zika, including the first cases of Zika identified in Haiti.
On January 8, 2015, a boy showed up at his school's health clinic with a fever of 100.4°F and abdominal pain, but no rashes and clear lungs. He was treated for typhoid.
In his blood, though, Morris's team found something else.
"We thought, 'Oh my, what's growing in the tissue culture? " Morris says. "This was a virus we had never seen before at the University of Florida. "
Genome sequencing revealed its identity as Mayaro, the group reported in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
There's no way to know for sure if the virus caused the boy's symptoms, as he simultaneously had dengue fever.
But the diagnosis suggests that Mayaro is actively circulating in the Caribbean, Morris says. And that calls attention to the unpredictable way that viruses can move around the world and then, without warning and for reasons scientists still can't explain, turn into massive epidemics. The newly detected case of Mayaro in Haiti "needs to be seen as a pattern of waves of viruses moving across continents, merging, changing and evolving," Morris says. "It reinforces the idea that there is a constant battle between humans and the microorganisms that infect humans. "
Diseases frequently emerge and re-emerge, says Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Health. And one case doesn't necessarily indicate an imminent epidemic.
But Mayaro is worth keeping an eye on.
"It's too early to make any projections except to say we need to pay attention," Fauci says. "We need to find out a bit more. "
Confirming at least one more case in or near Haiti will also be essential to assess the threat, says Tesh, whose research on Mayaro includes a 1999 study of 27 cases in South America. Because Mayaro is usually associated with a type of mosquito that likely doesn't live in Haiti, he says, it's possible that lab contamination produced a false result. It's also possible that other species of mosquitoes that live in Haiti are starting to carry the virus.
If the virus is in Haiti, it could have more opportunities to spread as the mosquito population is sure to proliferate in standing water left behind by Hurricane Matthew.
"To find a single case is kind of curious," Tesh says. "I would keep an eye on it. If we get another from Haiti or the Dominican Republic, then OK, maybe we should get concerned. "

 

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Child Brides Learn To Take Portraits Of Each Other — And Gain Insights Into Their Lives

Kristin Adair
Eunice, pictured above, is one of the workshop participants: "Today I learned a girl can do anything — that a boy and girl are equal, no one is more special, and I am happy about it. I am happy that the new things I learned today [are] to be confident and be powerful. "
Mercy/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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For 15 years, Stephanie Sinclair has taken photos of child brides around the world — from Tahani in Yemen, married at age 6, to 14-year-old Niruta in Nepal, and many more. In 2012, she started the nonprofit Too Young To Wed to raise awareness of their plight.
Now she's given some young women a chance to take their own pictures — a kind of art therapy that she hopes will "help girls deal with their trauma. "
In January, Sinclair and her team decided to turn the cameras over to a group of 10 girls in Kenya. They partnered with the Samburu Girls Foundation , which rescues girls from child marriage and female genital mutilation, to organize a weeklong photography workshop. Most of the 11- to 14-year-olds who participated had never held a camera before.
Nashaki: "Today we shared our stories with each other. It is important. My friend cried when she shared her story, but I know it also made her happy. It will not be forgotten. I love her. "
Jane/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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Sinclair and three volunteer photographers taught the girls basic digital photography skills so they could take portraits of each other. They also provided leadership training to help the girls "harness their inner strength and raise their voices confidently," says Sinclair.
"Today I learned a girl can do anything," says Eunice, a 14-year-old participant. "I learned how to take someone's photo by using the light from the window. I learned I am creative and can learn fast. "
We spoke to Sinclair about the workshop and its impact on the girls. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.
Naramat: "I'm at the Samburu Girls Foundation because I had many challenges at home. I wanted to go to school but no one would take me there. I am at peace because I am in school now. I want to be a teacher. A girl can be educated and be someone, like any other person in the world. "
Angela/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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Mary: "I have learned so many things for my future and my life. I can teach other girls in our society and advise them to stop early marriages and circumcision. "
Saleno/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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What's the hardest thing about taking a portrait?
[You need] to get them to be real in front of the camera. It's not just about composition and light, it's about the soul. If you can see it, if you can capture that and share it.
That seems like a tall order for first-time photographers.
You can't take a great portrait unless you know the person you are photographing. So we would pair the girls up in teams, and they would learn about each other, what they've been through.
We told them they didn't have to share the traumatic parts of their background. But all of them chose to share their experience with child marriage and FGM.
Within the first hour that they had the cameras, they created these really beautiful, vulnerable portraits. I think they just got it. They understood the power of their story and of their voice.
Angela: "Today we took photos of each other. We shared our stories about our challenges. It is good for girls to share their stories, these photos are from our heart. Marriage is not good for young girls. What I feel today: Nice, excited, fantastic, enjoyment. "
Naramat/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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Maria: "I was married when I was very young. I used to sell milk to get food and sleep in the forest because I don't have a place to sleep. Society should stop bad practices because what I have been through was so hard for me. After my education, I would like to be a nurse so that I can help other girls like me. "
Modestar/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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Can you tell us about a portrait that stuck with you?
One girl, Modestar, took a photograph of Maria. It's a tight portrait and she's kind of looking to the side. She's got these beautiful [traditional Samburu] beads on. Just 15 minutes before she took that picture, Modestar was crying. Maria was sharing her story for the first time in detail. Modestar had been rescued [from child marriage] just a few weeks before, so she was still very raw about the experience.
What do you think the girls got out of the workshop?
The workshop ended up being a form of art therapy, a way to help the girls feel confident that their voice matters.
We didn't realize the amount of tears that would be shed during the workshop, and cathartic moments that would happen as they took these intimate portraits of each other.
What did you end up doing with the photos?
We had an exhibition at the end of the workshop. We brought 70 members of the community, police, some of the chiefs of the villages, some of their parents.
We let the girls pick which pictures they wanted to share. Of course the girls had some goofy pictures that they did of each other and more uplifting pictures. But none of them chose to use those pictures for the exhibition. They felt strongly that the exhibit should be an opportunity to let people know that they were not okay with what had happened to them.
I remember there was a really pretty picture of Modestar and she was smiling. She said, "No I don't want to use that one. "
Modestar: "I am at the Samburu Girls Foundation for many problems. One is for early marriage. I could not go to school because my parents were very poor. This made me very sad. I could not say my A, B, C, Ds, but I knew I was a very bright girl. Today, they gave us small things called cameras. Everybody carries them. For the rest of my life, I will not forget this day. "
Maria/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation
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What did she select?
A more serious, contemplative picture. "I want people to know what I've been through, that this is how I feel," she said.
How did you think the workshop changed the girls?
At the beginning of the workshop, when you asked them their name, they were very quiet. At the exhibition, we had a microphone. I [told them], make sure you speak up — the event was outdoors and I was worried that the audience wouldn't be able to hear them that well.
They really roared into that microphone! They were passionately expressing what they had been through and asking the community to protect girls.
Any more workshops planned?
We hope to do a couple a year. This was our pilot program and it exceeded our expectations.
The idea of using photography to help child marriage survivors harness their inner strength and raise their voices confidently — it blossomed into this beautiful flower in the end.

 

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Saints' Top 10 salaries in 2016 compared to first-quarter production

NOTE: 2016 contract figures throughout the presentation were retrieved from salary cap websites, spotrac.com and ovethecap.com.
Brees ranks second in the league in yards passing (1,269) and touchdowns (10), while leading the NFL’s fifth-best offense (386 yards per game).
He has completed 116 of 176 passing attempts (65.9 percent) and has a 98.9 passer rating through four games.
Brees’ 98-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Brandin Cooks in Week 1 established a team record for the longest scoring play in team history.

 

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Alun Cairns peddling smears about Plaid Cymru, says Leanne Wood

The personality of Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood has indicted a Welsh secretary of peddling “myths and smears”, after he claimed members of her celebration had damaged a law over emigration into Welsh-speaking communities.
Alun Cairns done a comments on a BBC’s Question Time programme.
During a querulous sell with Ms Wood he pronounced it “wasn’t so prolonged ago” that “cottages were being burnt down”.
Ms Wood called for a “outrageous” comments to be withdrawn.
The Wales Office declined to respond to her critique of a secretary of state.
Plaid Cymru personality in Westminster Hywel Williams pronounced Mr Cairns should cruise his position.
Speaking to BBC Wales, he said: “I cruise he should apologize and cruise either he unequivocally is adult to a job.
“I’m not job on him to resign. It’s a matter for him – is he unequivocally adult to it?”
Labour AM David Rees also called for Mr Cairns to apologise.
He tweeted that a Welsh Secretary should “withdraw” his allegation.
“Unacceptable comments from any politician,” he said.
Mr Cairns had told a programme, as available in Neath on Thursday evening, that Ms Wood “seems to be really open to immigration into a UK though if it goes into Welsh-speaking communities afterwards she’s got something really critical to say”.
Ms Wood challenged him, saying: “What are we articulate about? Give me a quote, quote me.”
The cupboard apportion continued, observant “when there’s a emigration into Welsh-speaking communities, a formation in those communities, and I’m a ardent Welsh speaker… isn’t indispensably as it is and many of your members have taken approach movement in a past, many have damaged a law to that effect”.
“I would wish that you’d reject them temperament in mind a standpoint you’re holding now,” he said.
Ms Wood protested: “Who are we articulate about? What are we articulate about?” ‘Distorting history’
The Conservative MP for Vale of Glamorgan replied that there were “communities in Wales where there are jingoist activists that take approach movement opposite people who come in”.
Mr Cairns added: “It wasn’t so prolonged ago that some of a cottages were being burnt down.”
Ms Wood pronounced that was “nothing to do with Plaid Cymru”, job a comments “outrageous”.
On Friday, Ms Wood indicted a Welsh secretary of “distorting story with smears and insinuation”, observant he was “in rejection over a divisive tongue entrance from countless voices in his possess Tory party”.
“‎The secretary of state for Wales is guilty of peddling a accurate arrange of misconceptions and smears that multiply feeling and spin people opposite any other,” she said.
“Such comments and insinuations are not what we would design from a supervision minister. If he had any integrity, he would repel what he said.”
Defending her party, Ms Wood pronounced that “Plaid Cymru is an out‎ward-looking and internationalist party” and that given a referendum “we have challenged a Westminster establishment’s surge to a right as good as flourishing infrequent racism”.
Over a duration of 12 years from 1979, what became famous as a Meibion Glyndwr Welsh holiday homes arson debate saw 228 attacks.
One chairman was convicted of promulgation glow bombs by a post in 1993.
The debate came to an finish in a early 1990s.

 

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Scottish historian finds 'Hitler's first autobiography'

The first biography of Adolf Hitler which presented him as "Germany's saviour" and compared him to Jesus may have been written by the future dictator himself, a Scottish historian has claimed.
"Adolf Hitler: Sein Leben und seine Reden (Adolf Hitler: His Life and his Speeches)" was the first major profile of Hitler and appeared in 1923, authored by Victor von Koerber.
Historian Thomas Weber, from Aberdeen University, has unearthed documents in a South African archive which indicates the book was "almost certainly" written by Hitler himself as a "shameless but clever act of self-promotion".
"The book, which also includes a collection of Hitler’s speeches, makes some outlandish claims arguing that it should become 'the new bible of today' and uses terms such as 'holy' and 'deliverance', comparing Hitler to Jesus and likening his moment of politicalisation to Jesus' resurrection," Weber said.
"To find it was actually written by Hitler himself...demonstrates that he was a conniving political operator with a masterful understanding of political processes and narratives long before he drafted what is regarded as his first autobiography, 'Mein Kampf'. "
Weber, a professor of history and international affairs and a visiting scholar at Harvard University, said he found the evidence while reviewing von Koerber's papers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg for his new book about how Hitler became a Nazi.
The historian believes von Koerber was selected to front the biography due to his aristocratic lineage and reputation as a war hero.
"I found a signed testimony given under oath by the wife of the book's publisher stating that Victor von Koerber had not written the book and that Hitler had asked General Ludendorff (an ally in the failed putsch of 1923) if he could find a conservative writer without any connection to the Nazi party to put his name to it," he said.
"I also found a statement by Koerber as well as a letter he wrote to a man with whom he had been incarcerated in a concentration camp that gave details about Hitler's authorship of the book.
"Subsequently, in Germany, I found a document from 1938 in which von Koerber alludes to Hitler writing the book, stating that it was written 'on the initiative of and with the active participation of Adolf Hitler'. "
The book also contains the first reference to Hitler's "political awakening" in a military hospital which "would later be repeated in almost identical language in Mein Kampf".
Weber said: "Taken together, the pieces of evidence now available to us build a compelling picture that this was indeed an autobiography written to boost Hitler's profile as the 'German saviour' and that even at this early stage of his career he was an astute and manipulative political operator. "

 

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Busan: Seyfolah Samadian Reveals Abbas Kiarostami Documentary Project

BUSAN — Long-time Abbas Kiarostami associate Seyfolah Samadian is planning a documentary about 20 years of visits to the Cannes Film Festival that the late director made.
Samadian has been documenting Kiarostami’s life for some 30 years, and shot his 2001 documentary “ABC Africa” as well as being one of the camera operators on Bahman Maghsoudlou’s “Abbas Kiarostami: A Report” (2013.) He also directed “76 Minutes and 15 Seconds with Kiarostami,” a reference to the length of the late auteur’s life, that bowed in Venice and is playing in Busan as part of a Kiarostami retrospective.
“The next episode will be about Abbas’ 20 years in the Cannes Film Festival,” Samadian said.
Samadian was speaking at a Busan Film Festival event titled ‘Asian Auteur: Abbas Kiarostami or the Permanent Present of Iranian Cinema.’ Along with him was Kiarostami’s son Ahmad and another long-time associate Shohreh Golparian, who was instrumental in getting Iranian films released in Japan and introducing them to Busan. Golparian worked as Kiarostami’s assistant and interpreter on the Japan-set “Like Someone in Love.” Golparian also produced the Japanese-language films “Cut,” “The Story Isn’t Over Yet” and “Tokyo NY”
Kiarostami expert Lee Wang-joo, a professor at Pusan National University, moderated the discussion.
Speaking about his father, Ahmad Kiarostami said: “He himself was like his films, modest, honest and approachable. He left us a little hungry, so that we appreciate what he did even more.”

 

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Colombian government, FARC guerrilla force to work on resolving waylaid peace deal

Havana, Oct 8: Colombia's government and FARC guerrilla force have agreed to set up a "rapid and effective" process to "quickly" salvage a hard-won peace deal that was nevertheless rejected at the polls. In a joint declaration, the government and Revolutionary...

 

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Lewis Hamilton criticises 'disrespectful' media over social media claims

By Andrew Benson
Chief F1 writer at Suzuka
Lewis Hamilton says he is going to minimise his appearances at news conferences over what he says is a lack of respect from the media.
The move follows criticism he received for his behaviour in a news conference.
In it, Hamilton posted images of himself and a fellow driver on Snapchat with bunny faces and gave minimal answers.
He said it was intended as "a super light-hearted thing" and what was written was "more disrespectful".
As a result, he said: "Unfortunately the decision I will take unfortunately affects those who have been super-supportive, so that is why I am saying it with the utmost respect.
"But I don't really plan on sitting here many more times for these kind of things. So my apologies and I hope you guys enjoy the rest of your weekend. "
He then walked out of the news conference.
His remarks came in his usual news conference in the Mercedes area in the paddock at the Japanese Grand Prix after qualifying.
The world champion qualified second for Sunday's race behind team-mate Nico Rosberg, who has a 23-point advantage in the championship with fives races to go and 125 points still available.
Hamilton said: "I'm not here to answer your questions, I've decided. With the utmost respect, there are many of you here who are super-supportive of me and they hopefully know I know who they are.
"There are others unfortunately that often taken advantage of certain things. The other day was a super light-hearted thing, and if I was disrespectful to any of you guys, or if you felt I was disrespectful, it was honestly not the intention. It was just a little bit of fun.
"But what was more disrespectful was what was then written worldwide. "
Hamilton did not specify which particular articles he was offended by, and Mercedes said they did not know. The team did not know Hamilton was planning to make his statement.
In the official race preview news conference on Thursday, he had referred journalists who asked some questions about his remarks following his engine failure while leading the previous race in Malaysia to comments he had published on his social network outlets.
And he criticised the format of the news conference, in which six drivers are brought together to answer questions ahead of a race.
Asked what he was doing on his phone, before the Snapchat images of himself and Carlos Sainz were widely disseminated, he said: "It's quite funny, just some snaps of us drivers, it's quite funny. That's about it.
"Hey man, we've been doing this a long long time and it's the same each time so got to keep adding new things to it. "
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 52 /100 

Foton flaunts firepower, dominates F2

Foton displayed its full strength against fellow title favorite F2 Logistics to fashion out a 25-18, 25-20, 25-15, Saturday and open its campaign in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix women’s volleyball at FilOil Flying V Center in San Juan.
Tornadoes Jaja Santiago and imports Lindsay Stalzer and Ariel Usher were in their elements, imposing their towering presence against the Cargo Movers who played minus one reinforcement and injured Ara Galang.
So dominating was Foton it allowed coach Moro Branislav to send in new recruit Dindin Manabat in the final moments to reunite with sister Jaja Santiago in the court. The brief reunion thrilled the crowd as they last played together four years ago in National University in the UAAP.
“No it’s not yet our maximum,” said the Serbian mentor when asked to discuss their firepower. “In my opinion we are only 50-60 percent strong. We can still do better.”
That would be scary even to reigning All-Filipino champion F2 Logistics which got 12 points from big-hearted Aby Marano and seven from import Sydney Kemper who just arrived Thursday night.
Dora Spelman is set to arrive Tuesday, according to F2 Logistics camp. Galang is out due to knee injury, that would sideline her for one more week.
Usher exploded with 20 points, while Stalzer had 16. But the most telling was the discipline the Tornadoes displayed all three sets long.
They only committed nine errors throughout, while unleashing 46 attacks. The Cargo Movers could only launch 34 attacks and 17 errors.
Branislav said their time is divided between the ongoing PSL Grand Prix and the FIVB Women’s Club Championships. He is also the head coach of the PSL-F2 Logistics Manila in the Oct. 18-23 meet.

 

 53 /100 

The Mystery Of The 'Ghost Trees' May Be Solved

The redwood appears like a phantom: as if from thin air. What looked like a trick of the light a moment ago materializes into a trunk, branches, needles - a tree, roughly the height of a man, with...

 

 54 /100 

'Clown Purge' craze intensifies as Australian vigilantes lash out at pranksters

The clown craze which has left Australia on high alert is intensifying as costumed creeps menace victims with machetes and vigilantes lash out at the pranksters. Photographs and footage of sinister clowns in all corners of the country has fuelled social media hysteria and prompted vigilante 'clown hunting' groups to take matters into their own hands. Social media posts claim a clown was hospitalised after being king-hit in Sydney's south - hours after after the group 'Clown Purge Sydney' ominously warned 'we are coming for you.' Meanwhile footage has surfaced of clowns brandishing knives in Melbourne and another striking the bonnet of a car with a machete in Caboolture, north of Brisbane. Police have scaled up their warnings, with NSW and Victoria Police taking aim at the US-born craze as it well and truly takes root in Australia. Scroll down for video  Campbelltown police Inspector Tara Norton warned the phenomenon was fraught with danger for both the pranksters and the victims,  Macarthur Chronicle  reported. 'There's the potential for retaliation or people could be seriously hurt or could die by trying to get away. You also don't know if the person has a physical condition or mental condition where this behaviour could have disastrous effect. 'Don't get involved with a group of people going out to do something so ridiculous and dangerous. If you do, be prepared to face the consequences which will be serious.' Fresh images and footage show haunting jesters - some appearing to wield weapons - menacing onlookers in restaurants and caravan parks. Clown-hunting Facebook groups, some boasting tens of thousands of likes, suggest residents are coming to blows with the copycat pranksters. However a NSW police spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia they had not received any reports of the supposed assault in Caringbah, south Sydney. The phenomenon spawned in the US after social media users shared images of sinister clowns lurking in parks, highways and luring children into the woods. Some snapshots appear to show violence erupting between the clowns and their victims, with one laying flat on his back after being 'knocked out' by a passer-by, and another showing a woman hitting one with a long object. Victoria Police issued a warning about clowns frightening people in Melbourne. 'Victoria Police are aware of people who are parading in the public wearing clown masks,' a statement said. 'The clown purge appears to be a copycat of incidents being seen in the USA recently.' The Australian sightings come on the heels of mass 'clown hysteria' in the States after spooky clowns were caught creeping around children. There has also been widespread speculation the appearance of the horrifying characters are related to the release of Stephen King's new movie, It. It features Pennywise the clown, and King responded to the frenzy this week tweeting: 'Hey, guys, time to cool the clown hysteria--most of em are good, cheer up the kiddies, make people laugh.'

 

 55 /100 

EOTB's Lillie Lexie Gregg exposes her bra and flat stomach in racy jumpsuit

Her extensive heartbreak has been televised after Gary 'Gaz' Beadle' and Stephen Bear both cheated on her behind her back. Yet Lillie Lexie Gregg proved it was their loss as she partied the night away in style at Pure Bar in Bexleyheath, London on Friday. The 25-year-old Ex On The Beach star oozed sex appeal as she flashed some serious skin in a racy sheer jumpsuit which exposed her bra and flat stomach. Scroll down for video     The cold-shoulder garment exposed her spectacular tanned decolletage, before teasing her ample assets in her sexy black bra. A layer of provocative lace lay across her tiny midriff before the high-waisted element of the number took over. Proving to be a skinny fit, it sculpted her legs to perfection before she boosted her height in a pair of strappy open-toe heels which showed off her baby blue pedicure. Her long honey blonde hair were voluminous and teased to perfection, cascading down the front while still managing to show off her edgy 90's style choker. With her fluttery lashes and nude glossy lips, the beauty seemed in great spirits as she partied the night away with her fellow reality star pal, Aimee Kimber. The brunette absolutely sizzled in a scarlet jump-suit which featured an extensively low-cut neckline which plunged all the way down to her navel. On next week's episode of EOTB, Lille discovers her ex Gaz cheated on her with yet another resident in the villa. The designer is distraught upon Melissa Reeves' arrival when she utters that she hates her former flame, before the couple shock housemates when they explosively get hot and heavy later in the show. Lillie's arrival in the villa saw Gaz show his softer side as he lamented the end of their year-long romance, although he was later left in shock when Chrysten Zenoni entered the villa and revealed she slept with Gary during his relationship. The Birmingham-born beauty was flabbergasted at the news yet managed to put her agony at bay as she found herself in the arms of Stephen Bear, although he too snogged Chrysten with Lillie just a room away. With her problems spiralling, the stunning star felt she was out of shocks although the arrival of series two star Melissa causes her a whole world of pain, as she revealed she was yet another of Gaz's conquests. As Gaz returns from beach he appears sheepish which Lillie immediately picks up on saying: 'You are joking... Which one's crawled out of the woodwork now Gary?' The anxious star asks: 'It's not Charlotte is it?', before Gary reveals it is in fact Melissa Reeves, who first appeared on the show with Gaz as her ex in season two. Furious Lillie exclaimed: 'Why is that so bad?' before Gary boldly retorted: 'Because that's one of the people I slept with behind your back.' Gaz runs after a crying Lillie after insisting his only concern is his ex-girlfriend, who was yet again left a sobbing wreck due to her ex. He says: 'I'm so sorry. You are the best person I've ever met in my whole life and you will make someone very f**king happy. I swear to god. You are literally wifey material... I'm so sorry I swear to god. She can slap us, she can swill us she can do whatever but I am not leaving her side.' Lillie appeared extremely emotional as she said: 'I hate Gary but he is the only person in here I really really know.'

 

 56 /100 

Photographer Captures Mesmerizing Scenes From Hindu Rituals

Abbas has been capturing culture and religion around the world for nearly half a century. In his latest body of work, the photographer takes viewers into the mystical world of Hinduism with stunning e...

 

 57 /100 

On The Record: Hillary Clinton's Tenure At State

Hillary Clinton was an effective and well-respected Secretary of State at home and abroad. At the end of her time at State, a Washington Post-ABC news poll put her favorability rating at an astounding...

 

 58 /100 

Here's Why People Still Think Racist Asian Jokes Are Acceptable

-slanty eyes that perfectly align with Western beauty standards that he realized he had done something wrong. He knew he had said something racist. (It was also sexist if we’re being real - but ...

 

 59 /100 

‘Bigfoot’ gatecrashes Michigan nature webcam (VIDEO, POLL) — RT Viral

According to legend, the ape-like creature, otherwise known as Sasquatch, is said to stalk the forests of North America.
The prehistoric beast has been the subject of numerous alleged sightings and hoaxes for decades, including an incident in 2012 when a man attempted a Bigfoot prank  on a Montana highway and was fatally struck by two cars.
Now a clip from a webcam aired on CarbonTV has sparked suggestions that the mythical giant apeman is at large near the small rural village of Beulah, Michigan.
A segment of the sighting has been posted on Youtube. It shows two baby bald eagles feeding in a tree top nest, before an unidentified person or creature appears in the top right-hand corner of the screen.
Comments under the blurry video are unsurprisingly mixed, with some viewers declaring it a real live Sasquatch sighting and others calling it a hoax.
“Nothing but a man in a cheap monkey suit,” one person said.
Another added: “Awesome footage… I agree that this is a Bigfoot.”
The images were captured close to the Platte River State salmon hatchery.
Ed Eisch, the production manager at the fish farm, told the Detroit Free Press  that the “out of focus” footage is inconclusive since the camera “wasn’t set up to be focused on the ground.”
What do you think? Did the eagle chick webcam catch sight of Sasquatch or is it all a hoax?

 

 60 /100 

A Portrait In Numbers

Claudio Sanchez
Latinos are by far the fastest growing chunk ofthe U. S. school population. A new report by the National Council of La Raza gives a fascinating snapshot of this fast-growing population.
Here are some highlights:
Demographics
Achievement: The Good News
The not so good news from the NCLR report is that Latino students still face big challenges.
All of this, of course, has far-reaching implications, not just for Latino youth but for the nation's schools.
This is probably most evident/pressing in the challenge of educating English Language Learners (ELLs).
In a section titled "Education and Language," the NCLR study points out that even Latino children who start school speaking English are struggling, in part because too many are concentrated in low-performing schools with poorly trained teachers.
Poverty may not be destiny, but it sure does have an impact on teaching and learning.
Achievement: Challenges Remain
The NCLR report doesn't offer much that's surprising, but looked at overall, it paints a troubling picture. The data points put in context the ways in which the Latino population is evolving and maturing.
And given its implications for the future, it's data that educators and policy-makers should take seriously.

 

 61 /100 

L. A. police commissioners weighing reforms that would improve LAPD transparency and training on using deadly force

The Los Angeles Police Commission is considering significant changes in the way the LAPD handles shootings by officers, including releasing information to the public more quickly and expanding training designed to reduce the number of shootings.
The proposals, which the civilian panel will weigh next week, include seeking public opinion on releasing videos from those shootings, ensuring the LAPD provides accurate information about the incidents and adding more role-playing scenarios to help officers practice defusing tense encounters without firing their guns.
The proposals come after the commission’s inspector general completed an extensive study, made public Friday , looking at how other major departments deal with police shootings. The report found that some provide the public with more details faster and have embraced training based on real-world scenarios.
How officers use force and how departments share information about deadly encounters are two of the most scrutinized issues in modern-day policing, drawing fresh attention this summer after a series of deadly police shootings across the country.
Many law enforcement agencies have traditionally resisted releasing video evidence — including footage from cameras worn by officers or in their patrol cars — while investigations are under way. But in recent months, police in Fresno, El Cajon and Charlotte, N. C., bowed to pressure and made videos of contentious shootings public.
The LAPD followed suit this week after the controversial shooting of Carnell Snell Jr. prompted protests that stretched from South L. A. to the mayor’s Windsor Square home. In an unprecedented move, the LAPD released security video showing the 18-year-old holding a gun moments before he was fatally shot.
More than a third of the people shot by Los Angeles police last year had documented signs of mental illness, nearly triple the number from the year before, according to a lengthy review by LAPD officials made public Tuesday. The report also found that African Americans continued to account for a...
Friday’s recommendations from two police commissioners — Sandra Figueroa-Villa and Matt Johnson — come as the civilian board has been pushing the department to be more transparent and to find ways to minimize officers’ use of deadly force.
“We must constantly re-evaluate what we are doing and be willing to be self-critical so that we are always moving forward,” said Johnson, the board’s president. “These recommendations represent the desire to improve.”
The report and its proposals have long been in the works. Last fall, the Police Commission directed its inspector general, Alex Bustamante, to compare the LAPD’s policies, training and investigations regarding use of force with four other major agencies that have recently made changes to try to reduce force incidents.
Eleven months later, the result was a 33-page analysis also looking at how police in L. A., Dallas, Las Vegas, Washington, D. C., and San Diego address officers who fire their weapons, emphasize ways officers can try to avoid using force, and share information — including video — with the public.
The report notes that the information the LAPD initially provides about police shootings is “generally limited” to the basics: the condition of the person shot, the time and location of the shooting, why the officers were in the area and whether any weapons were found. It is not unusual for the department to take weeks before releasing the names of officers who fire their weapons.
Police in Las Vegas, however, quickly post short video statements about shootings on YouTube. About 48 hours later, the department releases the name, rank, age and length of tenure of the officers involved. Within the week, police give reporters an in-depth briefing that includes what happened in the moments before a shooting, photographs from the scene and audio from 911 calls. They also release any video collected, including footage from body cameras worn by officers.
LAPD Chief Charlie Beck has generally resisted releasing those videos outside of court, citing concerns over victim privacy and the need to protect investigations. He made a rare exception in Snell’s shooting, citing concerns over public safety and his desire to clear up what he called “significant misinformation” in the case.
Though the LAPD must abide by a different public records law than police in Nevada, the report noted that departments within California take different approaches to disclosing information.
For example, the report notes, some make 911 tapes and booking photos public. (The LAPD does not.) And officials in Fresno and Sacramento recently released footage from body or patrol car cameras that captured controversial shootings by police.
The report’s recommendations formalized remarks Johnson made earlier in the week, when he called for a review of the LAPD’s policy for releasing video. He and Figueroa-Villa directed the department to start a “comprehensive process” for gathering public feedback on that policy, including community forums, online questionnaires and focus groups. 
If the proposals are approved, a draft set of rules would then be posted online for 30 days. When the department prepares a revised video release policy for the commission to review, it would include an overview of how the public’s feedback was incorporated.
The commissioners also called on the department to determine what other information about police shootings could be released quickly and develop rules to ensure that information is accurate.
The proposals by Johnson and Figueroa-Villa would require the department to reexamine how it treats officers after they use deadly force. The LAPD should provide more support for officers as the investigation into their actions unfolds and must provide them with additional “reality-based” training before they go back to work in the field, the commissioners said.
Stopping a deadly superbug, medical marijuana, the battle for Mosul, how we scored the VP debate, California's interesting Senate debate, a Los Angeles County sheriff’s sergeant was killed in action, and coin slot machines are a dying breed in Las Vegas.
Columbia’s president receives the Nobel peace prize , Reggie Bush returns to L. A. , coin slot machines are dying in Las Vegas , and Desert Trip begins this weekend .
Obama administration officials have largely ignored the insults and ultimatums from Philippines leader Rodrigo Duterte.
For the last fiscal year, coins have accounted for less than 3% of the $50.5-billion slot machine drop, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. Just a handful of properties on the Strip have machines that take or dole out coins now, among them the MGM Grand, New York New York, the Bellagio...
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.
Law enforcement agencies are increasingly turning to role-playing training to provide officers with a realistic simulation of stressful encounters — often involving people who appear to be mentally ill or suicidal — that can result in shootings or other serious force. The goal is for officers to practice de-escalating those moments so that it comes more naturally in the field.
In Dallas, officers must decide how to approach a person with a shovel who is acting aggressively and appears to be having delusions. In San Diego, officers practice talking a man into surrendering during a hostage situation. In Washington,D. C., police are tested on their ability to disarm a knife-wielding suspect while keeping a group of unruly bystanders calm — all without using deadly force.
The LAPD offers some reality-based training to cops, according to the inspector general’s report, but other agencies use it more frequently. The commissioners directed the department to look for ways to regularly provide that training. 
“This type of training takes officers out of the classroom, away from the computer and puts them into role-playing situations as close to real-life scenarios as possible,” Johnson said.

 

 62 /100 

A wheelchair ramp may not be pretty, but condo group must allow it

Your wife, as a disabled person, is protected by fair housing laws. The law provides that people with disabilities may request reasonable modifications, which are structural changes to the existing premises that are necessary to provide full use and enjoyment of the home because of a disability-related need. If your wife cannot access your home through the front door — a basic expectation of all residents, whether disabled or not — then your HOA has a responsibility to permit her to make a necessary modification. Her need for a ramp also trumps any aesthetic concerns voiced by the HOA or any specific provisions in the HOA’s rules and regulations that may conflict with the request. The question of whether your wife or the HOA should bear the cost for installing a ramp depends on several factors, including whether the HOA receives any federal funding or whether the ramp would increase accessibility in a common area.
If your HOA does not approve installation of a ramp, your wife may file an administrative complaint with the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development or a lawsuit. For assistance resolving your issue through informal channels, you may want to contact your local fair housing agency.
Stopping a deadly superbug, medical marijuana, the battle for Mosul, how we scored the VP debate, California's interesting Senate debate, a Los Angeles County sheriff’s sergeant was killed in action, and coin slot machines are a dying breed in Las Vegas.
Columbia’s president receives the Nobel peace prize , Reggie Bush returns to L. A. , coin slot machines are dying in Las Vegas , and Desert Trip begins this weekend .
Obama administration officials have largely ignored the insults and ultimatums from Philippines leader Rodrigo Duterte.
For the last fiscal year, coins have accounted for less than 3% of the $50.5-billion slot machine drop, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. Just a handful of properties on the Strip have machines that take or dole out coins now, among them the MGM Grand, New York New York, the Bellagio...
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.

 

 63 /100 

Owning Twitter could bring Salesforce and its influence-seeking CEO new power

He oversees a technology empire in Northern California. He attracts huge audiences to his company’s events. And he’s celebrated for his philanthropy and social activism.
The descriptions might bring to mind Apple Inc. Chief Executive Tim Cook or Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg. But they apply just as well to Marc Benioff.
The founder and CEO of sales and marketing software giant Salesforce.com Inc., Benioff has commanded a major presence in Silicon Valley since emerging as a hotshot salesman at Oracle Corp. in the 1980s. Outside the worlds of sales, technology and philanthropy though, Benioff is hardly a household name.
His stature could change soon if Salesforce goes through with a considered multibillion-dollar acquisition of Twitter , the social media service that's among the world’s most-used apps.
Though the Salesforce logo hangs on gleaming towers around the world and on computer screens inside Sprint, Delta Airlines and its other customers, Twitter’s blue bird is far more recognizable, dotting news websites, TV shows and more than 250 million smartphones.
Owning Twitter would turn up the global spotlight on Salesforce, and by association, its charismatic leader.
Extra attention wouldn't be the driving force for taking up Twitter, but it could be among many secondary motivations, people who know or follow Benioff said. For one, increasing his prominence could make Benioff an even more significant force in the cultural, educational and medical issues he’s weighed in on around the world, philanthropy experts said.
“He is poised to emerge as one of the most important philanthropists in the world,” said Trevor Neilson, who’s advised Bill Gates and Angelina Jolie on donations and co-founded consultancy Global Philanthropy Group. “Benioff has already established himself as one of the most generous donors in the Bay Area, and an acquisition of Twitter would expand his global influence.”
Salesforce declined to comment on rumors about its interest in Twitter. Verizon Wireless, Disney and Microsoft also could consider bidding on the San Francisco company, which is under pressure from investors to find a way to boost usage and turn a profit.
Twitter, whose market capitalization exceeds $11 billion, would be a pricey acquisition for Salesforce, valued on the stock market at about $51 billion. Both companies saw their shares sink this week amid the swirling speculation about whether a deal would emerge in coming days.
Salesforce investors and customers don't see any sense in a Twitter acquisition, Deutsche Bank research analyst Karl Keirstead wrote in a report this week. Though acquisitions have been significant to Salesforce’s growth, purchases of consumer-oriented companies are rare.
“Salesforce is battling enterprise giants like Microsoft, Oracle and SAP that are gunning for a bigger slice of the cloud pie,” Keirstead said. “Buying a consumer-focused social media platform does little to help Salesforce in this effort. "
Other analysts said having Twitter would allow Salesforce to match IBM’s acquisition of Weather Co. this year and Microsoft’s purchase of LinkedIn, which Salesforce bid for too.
During a panel discussion at his company’s annual customer conference Dreamforce in San Francisco this week, Benioff offered a hint at what the tie-up could deliver. Many major companies use Salesforce software to track customers and online orders. A micro-messaging service and the data users share on it could help companies market to customers in a more personalized, customized and tightly integrated way, he said.
Beyond business, Benioff and Salesforce would stand to gain newfound attention because consumer mobile apps tend to generate more pop culture intrigue than those aimed at the workplace. It’s attention he could use to further personal causes.
Benioff, a USC grad, has ingrained giving back into Salesforce’s culture. Company executives told Forbes in 2014 that corporate giving practices are a key factor in judging potential acquisitions. 
Some benefactors take a more modest approach. Benioff goes big, in part to inspire other tech donors.
Jason Benlevi, author of “Too Much Magic: Pulling the Plug on the Cult of Tech,” noted that Benioff puts not only significant energy into charity work, but also getting recognized for it.
“He’ll spend a lot of money making people know he’s spending a lot of money,” Benlevi said.
Benioff’s fortune, estimated at $3.7 billion by Forbes, has funded children’s hospitals in San Francisco that bear his name. It’s gone to charities as far as India.
His influence, including the threat of economic sanctions, aided recent efforts to fight legislation in Indiana, North Carolina and Georgia that gay and transgender rights advocates said targeted their liberties.
“Do I personally think he needs Twitter to have that influence? No,” said Jennifer Walske, who sits on a board with Benioff and teaches about socially conscious business practices at the University of San Francisco. “But would it put them in a new market and bring them new visibility? Absolutely.”
Still, widespread appeal doesn’t correspond with a businessperson becoming a more successful producer of social change, experts said. It more often has to do with what products and services they build, whether Henry Ford and the mass-produced automobile or Zuckerberg and Facebook.
If Benioff can further Twitter’s use as a tool in fundraising and revolution, he’ll surely burnish his image, said Marc Pollick, founder and president of celebrity donor advisory firm Giving Back Fund.
Pollick recently worked with Hollywood producer Gordon Gray and several celebrities to raise $6 million to support research of Batten disease, with Twitter and other social apps helping garner thousands of donations. He saw that a donor’s fandom can matter as much as his or her bank account.
“Mr. Smith, worth $20 billion, could fund something,” Pollick said. “But because Mr. Johnson, worth $500 million, gets so many followers to his tweets, that amplifies the millions he has. Fame and wealth — it’s a very potent combination.”
Stopping a deadly superbug, medical marijuana, the battle for Mosul, how we scored the VP debate, California's interesting Senate debate, a Los Angeles County sheriff’s sergeant was killed in action, and coin slot machines are a dying breed in Las Vegas.
Columbia’s president receives the Nobel peace prize , Reggie Bush returns to L. A. , coin slot machines are dying in Las Vegas , and Desert Trip begins this weekend .
Obama administration officials have largely ignored the insults and ultimatums from Philippines leader Rodrigo Duterte.
For the last fiscal year, coins have accounted for less than 3% of the $50.5-billion slot machine drop, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. Just a handful of properties on the Strip have machines that take or dole out coins now, among them the MGM Grand, New York New York, the Bellagio...
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.

 

 64 /100 

At the University of Redlands, guys meet to parse what it means to be men

Marcus Garcia raised his hand in a circle of classmates and stumbled through a question many of them had pondered but not out loud.
Does pornography change the way young men are attracted to women? And are those feelings normal?
Curiosity charged the silence in the room, where Garcia and fellow University of Redlands students were encouraged to share their thoughts without fear of judgment.  
On college campuses these days, it seems as if everyone has a safe space, whether they be people of color, Muslim or Jewish, queer or questioning, women facing oppression. But what about guys? What about the 18-year-old, 19-year-old, 20-year-old fellow shaped by society into thinking that being tough, being hypersexual, being aggressive goes hand-in-hand with being a man?
At this close-knit liberal arts school tucked into the San Bernardino Valley, campus leaders are encouraging young men to get together and … talk. About emotions, about body image, about whether objectifying women and chugging beer actually makes one more masculine.
DUDES, which stands for Dudes Understanding Diversity and Ending Stereotypes, is the school’s take on a counterintuitive concept: the men’s center. Through pop-up workshops, speaker series and social activities, students are prompted to explore the challenges they may not even realize they face. 
A man who was seen on security video knocking a woman out with one punch outside a Venice Beach market was charged with felony battery this week, prosecutors said.
Michael Joseph Fino, 44, of Santa Monica, pleaded not guilty Thursday to hitting the woman outside Windward Farms Sept. 25, knocking...
A man who was seen on security video knocking a woman out with one punch outside a Venice Beach market was charged with felony battery this week, prosecutors said.
Michael Joseph Fino, 44, of Santa Monica, pleaded not guilty Thursday to hitting the woman outside Windward Farms Sept. 25, knocking...
Discussions like the one Garcia recently attended are candid but structured. The talk that day, “PORN: Good, Bad or Ugly?”, was led by Catherine Salmon, a professor of psychology and human sexuality.  
Garcia’s question, she informed the group, was one researchers had wondered as well.
One study, she said, interviewed men in happy relationships. But after being shown photos of models and porn stars, every single man found his partner less attractive.
Chairs creaked, more hands went up. Assured they were not alone in their thoughts, the men had much more to share.
“To realize, wow, because of pornography and Hollywood, I’m looking at a girl and not thinking she’s as beautiful because I’ve been programmed to think this and that about women,” said Garcia, a junior. “There are stereotypes placed on men that we have to face, which pressures us to make decisions that we don't have to make.” 
When a friend told him about DUDES, it seemed like a perfect fit. His studies center on social activism, and he has often felt judged for seemingly inconsequential things such as wearing pink or asking for help. 
Now phrases such as “authentic masculinity” and “taking off the man mask” work their way into his conversations with peers. They talk about sex, drugs, violence, Vin Diesel and the empathetic softie played by Michael Cera in the movie “Juno” and whether it’s possible to embody both characters at once.
Men’s centers still are uncharted territory. A handful of colleges across the nation have tried them. It’s an unexpected approach to identity awareness — one that easily could be misunderstood.
But helping young men unlearn the myths of masculinity, advocates say, profoundly changes the sort of thinking and behavior that can lead to violence and sexual assault. And it prepares them, when they graduate, to break down gender walls that still exist in the workplace and society.
“We draw awareness to a lot of these things that we as men do and then challenge it — is that something we should continue or something that we should change?” said Zack Ritter, associate director of campus diversity and inclusion at Redlands and co-founder of DUDES.
DUDES began as part of an effort to improve male student retention. At most U. S. colleges, including Redlands, men tend to withdraw or take leaves of absence at higher rates than women. Redlands formed a committee to find out why.
They learned that, outside of fraternities and sports teams, most of those involved in the dozens of extracurricular activities on campus were women. The more involved they were, the more they felt connected to a community, the more motivated they were to stay in school.
Men make up just under half of Redlands’ undergraduate population of 2,445 students — and about 40% of them are in fraternities or participate in athletics. So what does the school have to offer the other 60%?
Young men are less likely than young women to “just grab coffee,” so creating regular activities that bring them together can help them start to talk and develop friendships, said Fredric Rabinowitz, a professor who studies male psychology and advises the retention committee.
“What we’re trying to do is catch the guys that aren't in a club, the guys who don’t belong to anything,” he said. “We’re catching those who are struggling academically, the men who were cut off of sports teams, the men who were just in their rooms playing video games.”
Men are hungry for interpersonal connection — if you provide the space, said Jon Davies, the counseling psychologist who in 2002 co-founded one of the first college men’s centers, at the University of Oregon.
When Davies ran focus groups to figure out what young men wanted in a center, he found that they enjoyed getting together to answer his questions.
“They said ‘Hey, Jon, we really like this, create more opportunities for us to get together in small groups to talk about our concerns, but, ” he said, laughing, “call it something different than counseling.’”
The University of Massachusetts Amherst now has a Men and Masculinities Center to “interrogate and deconstruct traditional forms of masculinity.” Last fall,  Trinity College  in Hartford, Conn. created a Masculinity Group to talk about the unrealistic expectations that arise from  “toxic masculinity.”
At Redlands, Ritter moved into the dorms last year and with a colleague, Reggie Robles, began hosting retreats, poetry slams and discussions on topics such as men and gun culture and male careers in the nonprofit world. In one playful activity, young men tried to walk in 4-inch red heels as a way to put themselves in someone else’s shoes.
As interest grew, the duo developed “DUDES: Understanding Male College Student Journeys,” a one-credit course to further explore such ideas.
Take basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain, Ritter told the class recently. He was terrible at free throws, so he switched to shooting them underhand, “granny style.”
“It’s easier, right?” Ritter said, as he had students try to toss a ball into a trash bin both ways. “He upped his game, scored 100 points, but he still switched back because he didn't want to look like a ‘sissy’…. Why? What does this say about peer pressure?”
On any given day, young men now wander in and out of the same rooms that house the Multicultural Center and women’s center (recently renamed the Center for Gender Justice). They talk masculinity in a room decorated with flyers for Eid celebrations and performances of “The Vagina Monologues.”  It’s a fitting setting for what Ritter describes as a “traveling men’s center.”
DUDES works with other campus groups to look at male identity through different lenses, such as how it felt to be a Middle Eastern man after the San Bernardino terrorist attack. It welcomes women. When some suggested DUDES was recreating an old boys club, Ritter said their perspective was needed to teach men to be men. “When women speak in these circles,”he said, “lightbulbs go off, even for me.”
Experts praise Redlands’ inclusive approach, but acknowledge reasons why such centers are rare on college campuses.  
“A lot of people don't see the need for it, but we also don't do a good job of framing it,” said Frank Harris III, a San Diego State University professor who studies male gender identity and masculinity issues. Efforts to address sexual assault, for example, often focus on making sure women have more whistles or blue lights on campus rather than stressing that certain male behaviors need to be unlearned.
Still, he said, “we have to be mindful of what these all-male communities look like” and what versions of masculinity they’re espousing. If not, it might just be a bunch guys getting together and reinforcing old habits.
There’s still work to do at Redlands, said Emari McClellan, a middle linebacker who has been trying to convince others on the football team to participate in DUDES.
It’s challenging, he admitted, to call them out for certain things they say. Often, he pulls them aside after practice.
“Hey, some things that you're saying — you can change that,” he tells them. “Come to DUDES. The stuff we talk about is cool.”
He doesn’t mind sticking his neck out, he says, if he can expand others’ thinking the way DUDES has his.
“You can be a man in modern day society but also express emotions and not be called feminine,” he said. “I can be myself and still be accepted.”
On a recent Thursday, he rushed from practice to DUDES class. As he got settled, he looked up and grinned.
One of his teammates had followed him in.
Stopping a deadly superbug, medical marijuana, the battle for Mosul, how we scored the VP debate, California's interesting Senate debate, a Los Angeles County sheriff’s sergeant was killed in action, and coin slot machines are a dying breed in Las Vegas.
Columbia’s president receives the Nobel peace prize , Reggie Bush returns to L. A. , coin slot machines are dying in Las Vegas , and Desert Trip begins this weekend .
Obama administration officials have largely ignored the insults and ultimatums from Philippines leader Rodrigo Duterte.
For the last fiscal year, coins have accounted for less than 3% of the $50.5-billion slot machine drop, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. Just a handful of properties on the Strip have machines that take or dole out coins now, among them the MGM Grand, New York New York, the Bellagio...
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.
Sergeant Steve Owen was responding to a burglary when he was fatally shot.

 

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Misery for tourists as 'flash crash' means the pound is now worth less than a euro at airports as sterling reaches a 31-year low

Holidaymakers are being offered as little as €0.97 to the pound in airports in another body blow for sterling. Sterling endured a torrid day yesterday on the currency markets after an overnight 'flash crash' triggered by a suspected 'rogue algorithm' sent it plummeting to a fresh 31-year low against the US dollar. Now it has dropped below the euro and the value of the pound has fallen 15 percent since the EU referendum. Sterling had come under sustained pressure during the week after investors became increasingly alarmed that Prime Minister Theresa May was opting for a so-called 'hard Brexit', whereby Britain would leave the European single market so the Government could tighten its grip on immigration. However, market-watchers said the 'flash crash' was probably caused by an algorithm reacting to a news story stating that French president François Hollande was taking a tough stance on Brexit negotiations. In a statement, the Bank of England said governor Mark Carney had asked the Bank for International Settlements markets committee to investigate the events surrounding the flash crash. Connor Campbell, financial analyst at Spreadex, said: 'If the pound was a prize fighter, the referee would have already rung the bell, the currency bloodied and bruised beyond belief.' He said that the pound seemed to recreate Thursday night's 'flash crash' in slow motion on Friday, as it remained heavily down against the euro and the dollar. It added: 'With input from the Bank, the committee will review the lessons from this, and other recent episodes of flash events in markets at its next meeting.' Such has been the severity of the currency fall in recent days that it forced retailer Sports Direct to issue a profit warning on Friday. It said the 'extreme movements' in the pound would cause full year earnings to hit £285million, compared with the £300million it had originally pencilled in. Kathleen Brooks, research director at spreadbetter City Index, said: 'Apparently it was a rogue algorithm that triggered the sell-off after it picked up comments made by the French president, Francois Hollande, who said if Theresa May and co want hard Brexit, they will get hard Brexit. 'These days some algos trade on the back of news sites, and even what is trending on social media sites such as Twitter, so a deluge of negative Brexit headlines could have led to an algo taking that as a major sell signal for GBP. 'Once the pound started moving lower, then more technical algos could have followed suit, compounding the short, sharp selling pressure.' The 'flash crash' capped a tumultuous week for the pound, which saw it drop more than 4 percent against the U. S. dollar since Friday, September 30. The UK currency plumbed new depths on Thursday after German chancellor Angela Merkel took a tough stance on Brexit, saying Britain would not get access to the European single market if it did not accept free movement of people. Any hopes that an economic update from the manufacturing sector on Friday would provide some relief for sterling were quickly dashed. Output could only muster a slight rebound to 0.2 percent in August, while industrial production posted a worse-than-expected fall of 0.4 percent over the period. In contrast, sterling's slide has dished out a hefty boost to the FTSE 100 Index in recent sessions, with the London market coming within a whisker of recording an all-time high on Tuesday. Foreign companies listed in London have seen their shares rocket amid the pound's tumble as it boosts their earnings when they are translated back into sterling. The FTSE 100 Index closed up 0.6% to 7044.39 on Friday.

 

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Kelly Osbourne channels rock chic in all black ensemble and quirky shades as she heads to dinner in Los Angeles

She's the daughter of Black Sabbath legend Ozzy. And Kelly Osbourne channelled her rockstar genes when she headed to dinner in Los Angeles in an all-black ensemble on Friday night. The Shut Up hitmaker, 31, looked every inch the metal icon, layering a black coat over a midi dress, completing her look with white socks and lace-tie platform heels. Tying her purple hair back with a black bandana, Kelly accessorised with some funky circular tinted shades, a statement necklace and a sequinned bag. The star - who had a UK number One singing Changes with Ozzy in 2003 - was all smiles as she got into a friend's red Ferrari for the trip to Craig's restaurant. Her outing comes after she attended the Breaking The Silence Awards in Los Angeles on Thursday in support of LGBT sexual and domestic abuse survivors. The 31-year-old star - with her signature lavender hair loosely curled on side - wowed in a cleavage-baring white wrap dress. As a host of the evening, the British beauty looked the part as she opted for a low-cut, white dress, which was cinched with a belt, and flared at the sleeves. She wore a fitted black top underneath and matching pointy shoes. Kelly paired her look with an oversize coat that she slung over her shoulders and a dainty pendant and bracelet to round out the outfit. In August, the reality star was thrown in the midst of legal problems after her father's former mistress filed a complaint. Hairdresser Michelle Pugh - who was seeking compensatory and punitive damages - accused Kelly of having 'stimulated controversy for the purpose of making money' and promoting her upcoming book, There's No F***ing Secret. This came after Kelly leaked the hairdresser's phone number online when news of her affair with the Black Sabbath rocker was made public. The court documents accused Kelly of using her Twitter account to 'paint a target' on Michelle as a 'publicity stunt for financial gain' when she leaked the number back in May. And the hairdresser also accused Kelly of disregarding both Twitter's policies and a cease and desist letter she received from her lawyers. Michelle further accused Kelly of using software to unblock listed numbers to obtain her private number, and insisted the row was a 'choreographed media play' because her book deal was announced less than a month after the offending tweets were published. She also said Kelly had 'violated her right to privacy,' impacted her ability to obtain work and caused 'severe emotional distress.' The legal complaint accuses Kelly of public disclosure of private facts, negligent interference with prospective economic relations and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Michelle's number was previously disconnected after Kelly tweeted: 'Anyone looking for cheap chunky LOW-lights a blow out and a blowjob call.'

 

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Donald Trump's use of Facebook Live for apology highlights platform's credentials over traditional media

Following the Washington Post's publication of a tape recording in which Donald Trump was heard boasting about the lewd acts he carried out on unconsenting women, the presidential candidate used Facebook Live to issue a public apology in a move which further strengthens the platform's credentials as an alternative to traditional news broadcasting channels.
The recording was made in 2005 for the Access Hollywood television show hosted by Billy Bush – a cousin of George and Jeb Bush- and captures a conversation between Trump and Bush which took place on a bus before they were in camera shot.
In the recording Trump can be heard making obscene boasts about how he leverages his fame to sexually prey on women. The then newly married Trump says: "I am automatically attracted to beautiful women. I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss, I don’t even wait … and when you’re a star they let you do it. You can do anything.”
Bush repartees with Trump who goes on to say: " “Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything.”
Republican leaders who have publically endorsed Trump, including speaker of the house, Paul Ryan and senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, have condemned the 70 year-old reality TV star.
Hours after the Post published the video Trump took to Facebook Live to issue an apology saying:
Anyone who knows me knows these words don’t reflect who I am. I said it. I am wrong. I apologize.
“I’ve never said I am a perfect person, nor pretended to be someone that I am not. I’ve said and done things I regret and the words released today on this more than decade-old video are one of them.”
Trump has previously praised Twitter having made such remarks on the platform as "I love Twitter.... it's like owning your own newspaper--- without the losses". He is also a heavy user of Twitter so his decision to turn to Facebook Live to deliver his apology before publishing it on Twitter illustrates the appeal which Facebook Live now has for delivering public addresses.
The use of the two social media platforms throughout the presidential campaign serves as yet another example to the evolving nature of politics as a result of social media and technology in general. The platforms have allowed Trump and his campaign to each millions of followers without the need to buy ads and have also allowed his to keep journalists, who may ask difficult questions, at bay.
At the time of writing, Trump had 11,054,743 likes on his Facebook page.

 

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Melanie Blatt stuns in gold lamé suit as All Saints perform in Glasgow

Working their signature chic urban style, Shaznay Lewis, Melanie Blatt and Nicole and Natalie Appleton perfectly coordinated their looks as they performed a number of their hits at the Scottish city's O2 Academy. Scroll down for video  Showcasing their moves, 41-year-old Melanie made sure to turn heads in her gold lamé inspired loose-fitting suit. The relaxed fit two-piece hung off her slight frame as she teamed the eye-catching look with an oversized cream shirt which teased at her taut stomach. Completing her look, Melanie wrapped an on-trend black fabric scarf around her neck as she strutted her stuff on stage in a pair of classic Adidas high tops. The blonde singer's tresses fell loose in front of her face as she performed alongside bandmate Natalie. Looking fashion forward, Natalie worked an all black look, flaunting her enviable figure in a pair of form-fitting denims with daring zip front detail that showcased her perky derriere. The 43-year-old added a dramatic edge to her ensemble with a black high neck top with intricate beading and over-the-top fringing. Working her unique look on stage, Natalie teamed a dark smokey eye to spice up her ensemble while her sister Nicole looked chic in a tailored red and black suit. Channelling ringmaster chic, the former wife of Liam Gallagher highlighted her tiny waist in the tapered pant number. Working the crowd,  Shaznay sizzled in a pair of biker inspired leather pants ran through a set of old favourites and material from their latest album Red Flag. The four-piece 90s' girl band revealed moody music video, with renowned fashion photographer Rankin, to mark the release of their second comeback single, This Is A War earlier this year. The heartfelt song is said to have been inspired by Nicole Appleton's marriage split from former Oasis frontman, Liam Gallagher, after it emerged he'd had a secret love child with American journalist Liza Ghorbani in 2013. Nicole's divorce court battle raged for two years until she was eventually awarded a £5.5million payout earlier this year.

 

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Antimicrobial resistance occurs naturally in soil bacteria

Bacteria, isolated from soil and with no known contact with human society, have been shown to exhibit antimicrobial properties. The organisms were isolated from in prairie soils. The finding, which has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, has been Antibiotics, and resistance genes, The reason for the examination is because Agricultural Research Service researchers are seeking to understand agriculture-related antibiotic resistance and links to animal production. Dr. Lisa Durso, The study showed all prairies contained bacteria that were resistant to tetracycline and cefotaxime. These are two commonly prescribed antibiotics that treat a wide variety of infections. Moreover, just under 50 percent of the samples contained bacteria resistant to two or more antibiotics. What is of arguably greater significance is that the broad activity of the resistance genes found in association with soil bacteria might afford protection against newly developed antibiotics. It is hoped such examinations will allow microbiologists to differentiate antibiotic resistance caused by human antibiotic use from resistance that occurs naturally. This information could help to identify suitable areas for rearing animals. Microbial communities in soil are complex and vast in numbers. There are, for instance, as many microorganisms in 1 gram of soil as there are humans on the entire planet. The finding, which has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, has been reported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. With this, microbiologists discovered antibiotic-resistant bacteria in prairie soils. The researchers are of the view that the bacteria will have had little or no exposure to human or animal activity. Antibiotics, and resistance genes, occur naturally in soil due to the interactions between microbial species competing for territory. For example, the bacterial genus Actinomycetes are capable of synthesizing antibiotics, which provide a natural antibiotic residue in soils (several species provided the basis of early antibiotics.) It still remains that around 80 percent of the antibiotics in clinical use originated from soil bacteria, either directly as natural products or as their semi-synthetic derivatives. The reason for the examination is because Agricultural Research Service researchers are seeking to understand agriculture-related antibiotic resistance and links to animal production. Dr. Lisa Durso, in a research note has indicated that ungrazed prairie soils close to Lincoln, Nebraska have various levels of bacteria with antibiotic resistance. The area selected was one that had little human impact and no animal grazing during the past 20 years. The study showed all prairies contained bacteria that were resistant to tetracycline and cefotaxime. These are two commonly prescribed antibiotics that treat a wide variety of infections. Moreover, just under 50 percent of the samples contained bacteria resistant to two or more antibiotics. What is of arguably greater significance is that the broad activity of the resistance genes found in association with soil bacteria might afford protection against newly developed antibiotics. It is hoped such examinations will allow microbiologists to differentiate antibiotic resistance caused by human antibiotic use from resistance that occurs naturally. This information could help to identify suitable areas for rearing animals.

 

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Some retailers will avoid opening on Thanksgiving

Pre-Black Friday sales have been common in recent years, with shoppers scurrying to stores after Thanksgiving dinner. But several retailers are vowing not to begin one of the biggest retail sales days of the year on Thanksgiving Day.

 

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Girls spend much more time on chores than boys: U. N.

Girls spend 160 million more hours a day performing unpaid household chores than boys around the world, according to a new report from Unicef. On average, girls between 5 and 14 years old spend 40 percent more time than boys performing unpaid chores, including cooking, cleaning, and collecting water...

 

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After cancer treatment, complementary care calms

Breast cancer care has come a long way. Treatment is much less devastating than it used to be, but it’s still rough on patients. Many women have found that incorporating alternative health practices such as yoga, massage and acupuncture that are not part of standard medical treatments has helped them cope with the physical and emotional woes that accompany cancer care.
“The main goal of all these complementary therapies is to try to minimize the side effects of treatment,” says Dr. Ricardo Alvarez, director of cancer research at Cancer Treatment Centers of America Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Newnan, Ga. For example, he says oncology massage helps lymphedema (swelling after lymph node removal) and acupuncture helps neurotoxicity (damage to the nervous system) related to radiation or chemotherapy.
Using complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, gives people a greater sense of control over their care, says Dr. Larry Cripe, an oncologist and founder of the CompleteLife Program at Indiana University Health Simon Cancer Center. CAM users tend to be less distressed, depressed and anxious than patients who don’t use CAM as they go through treatment, he says. Many CAM therapies have shown promise in helping people cope with the disease and do better “in the survivorship phase.”
Breast surgeon Dr. Radha Iyengar, medical director of the Breast Center at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen, supports patients's use of complementary therapies, adding they are “a great adjunct when used appropriately with the traditional therapies.”
Karen Reynolds, a corporate trainer based in Atlanta, was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer four days after her birthday in 2014. After undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, she wanted to help her body heal.
“I was really open to just anything that would help me,” Reynolds says. “I took advantage of the holistic approach to taking care of the whole body,” not just removing the cancer, at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Atlanta.
Rehabilitation oncology — physical and occupational therapies that help people recover strength, balance and functioning abilities during or after cancer treatment —  helped Reynolds fight back from “chemo brain,” a side effect that sapped her cognitive skills and memory.
Therapists helped Reynolds develop solutions to improve her memory, such as getting and staying organized, adopting a new way to take notes and using brain game apps to keep her mind engaged.
Her recent mammogram shows “everything looks good,” she says. “I am in remission and I’m happy about that. Now it’s just a matter of continuing... on this path.”
Physical therapy is great for helping people regain balance, but many don’t stick with their program because it’s hard work. Dance, on the other hand, is fun and gives people a more pleasant way to practice the same basic skills that PT uses, such as side-to-side weight transfer and walking forward and backward.
Kathleen Hall learned just how much dancing could help after treatment. Her first bout with breast cancer began in October 2011. After she participated in a cancer drug clinical trial and had a right breast mastectomy, everything seemed fine.
Eighteen months later, her cancer came back. The Asheville, Ohio, woman had radiation and chemotherapy. For complementary care, she chose yoga and swimming through the JamesCare for Life program at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Care Center. When OSU launched a new study using Argentine tango to improve balance and reduce fall risk in cancer patients, Hall signed up. “I love to dance.”
As many as 70 percent of chemotherapy patients develop peripheral neuropathy — loss of feeling in their extremities that affects their balance, gait and risk of falling. The tango study was designed to help cancer patients improve their balance and reduce their risk of falling.
“We chose Argentine tango because it had already been shown to improve balance in Parkinson’s disease,” explains researcher Lise Worthen-Chaudhari, a physical rehabilitation specialist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Neurological Institute.
Unlike the dramatic “rose in the teeth” American version of tango, Argentine tango is “just walking forwards and backwards, side to side (and) a little bit of improvisation” with a partner, to music, Worthen-Chaudhari says. “Movement is medicine.”
P hyllis Trimble, of Russellville, Ark., a budget officer with the U. S. Forest Service, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. After surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, Trimble’s surgeon told her complementary therapies “work really well together” when paired with conventional treatments. Her program included physical therapy, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic and spiritual support. “She was right,” Trimble says. “It really made a big difference.”
One of the first people she and her husband saw was a naturopath. “He took the time to make us feel comfortable with using supplements,” she says. He recommended an inhaler that stopped smell-triggered nausea and to take supplements after learning she was allergic to the medicine normally used to treat hot flashes caused by chemotherapy.
If you do plan on taking supplements, loop in your doctor and oncology team. While dietary supplements such as vitamins, amino acids, powders and liquids can be beneficial, they can also involve risks, according to the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. Some can affect how your body uses treatment medicines by reducing the drug’s effectiveness or increasing adverse effects.
Trimble’s naturopath provided alternatives and for that she is thankful. “I had a few challenges there,” Trimble says, but she’s convinced natural medicines are “the way to go.”
Cat Garlit Bucher, a resources consultant who lives in Sherman, Texas, says her breast cancer diagnosis “was a shock,” but didn’t come as a complete surprise because both her parents died of cancer.
Bucher understood that while going through chemotherapy, she needed to be the healthiest patient she could be by practicing good nutrition, living in wellness and going through the breast cancer experience with a positive attitude. She relied on the inspirational songs that she grew up with in Peru and Ecuador to give her peace and help her feel relaxed and empowered.
Bucher has traveled all over the world teaching massage and relaxation techniques to people who have experienced tragedies. “I tend to stop breathing in a crisis,” Bucher says, but adds that “meditational rhythmic music that paces my breathing” helps her stay calm.
Cancer can cause worry, lost sleep and instill fears of recurrence, says Carmon Weaver Hicks, a psychology and sociology teacher in Indianapolis, whose breast cancer metastasized to her bones. One way she staves off the mental intrusions is through meditation and yoga.
Every three weeks, Weaver Hicks has infusion therapy at Indiana University Health. Oncology-trained yoga therapist Stella Snyder helps each patient practice relaxation techniques during infusion to make treatment more bearable. When Snyder saw how much those techniques helped Weaver Hicks, she suggested trying yoga, too.
Gentle chair-yoga classes focus on mind, breathing and meditation practices to fight fatigue, “the No. 1 side effect” of cancer treatment, Snyder says. Practicing yoga eases stress, which can help immune function, increase feelings of vitality and well-being and calm the anxiety patients feel about treatments.
Weaver Hicks loved it: “Yoga has changed my life in really positive ways.”
Guided imagery, a relaxation technique directed by a therapist or an audio recording, can help people focus on positive mental images that promote relaxation, lessen pain and reduce problem symptoms. (It can also be self-directed.) Studies show it may give a temporary boost in total immune system cells, reduce depression and increase a sense of well-being, according to the nonprofit organization breastcancer.org .
Laura Squillace of Southfield, Mich., was working with an advertising agency when she and her sister were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. Both sisters carried the BRCA1 gene linked to more aggressive cancer and both went through treatment.
While Squillace was having surgery at Beaumont Health in Royal Oak, Mich., her sister bought a guided imagery CD on healing at the hospital’s integrative medicine department.
It “sounds crazy” but it works, Squillace says, adding it’s a “way to slow your breath down, slow your mind down and go to a place where you can focus.”
Guided imagery specialist Gail Evo, Beaumont’s director of integrative medicine, also created a CD for Squillace using images to help relax. Squillace passed the five-year survival mark in September. “I have had no recurrence and I feel fantastic.”

 

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At Willowbrook Museum Village, a chapter of history closes

NEWFIELD — Vicki Akers’ eyes were still wide and her grin broad a couple of minutes after she climbed down from the hand-painted horse.
The 64-year-old engraver had just ridden the whimsical 1894 carousel at 19th century Willowbrook Museum Village, but described herself as “heartbroken.”
Akers was on her first and only visit to Willowbrook, an outdoor museum that uses historic buildings and a 5,000-piece collection to replicate small-town Maine in the 1800s. She came to Willowbrook on a recent Friday afternoon with family and friends after hearing that the place would close for good on Columbus Day. It’s been open for 46 years.
Akers is among the hundreds of visitors who have flocked to the village museum since the closing was announced more than a month ago, realizing now what a rare resource Willowbrook is and how difficult, if not impossible, it will be to replace. Like many privately run outdoor history museums today, Willowbrook’s challenges to stay in business included intense competition from newer attractions, such as water parks or zip line parks, as well as a decades-long decline in families taking regional vacations by car. And like many outdoor museums, including Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts, Willowbrook was created mostly by one family whose money funded operations for years. With a dwindling endowment, no large corporate sponsors emerging and the number of paid admissions down to about 6,000 a year, Willowbrook has been running deficits for years.
“We’re basically out of money,” said Doug King, president of Willowbrook’s board and son of founder Don King, standing on Elm Street in the middle of the village. “The response to our closing has been huge, we’ve been having 10 to 15 times the (usual) number of visitors on a daily basis. People say ‘We’re so sad you’re closing.’ But where have they been all these years?”
Like many Mainers, Akers had just never made the time to visit. Once she did, she realized how special the place was.
“We need places like this, for the kids, to show them what life was like. This place is so hands-on, and they can touch everything,” said Akers, of Denmark, who had her grandchildren with her.
The bulk of Willowbrook’s collection, including some of the smaller structures and carousel, will be gifted to Curran Homestead in Orrington, near Bangor. Curran’s board hopes to expand its history museum complex, which now has eight buildings, to something comparable to Willowbrook.
Willowbrook’s best years were right around the nation’s Bicentennial celebration in 1976, when history was a big attraction and families favored road trips over Disney cruises or trips abroad. The peak was 18,000 visitors in one year, King said. But since the 1980s, the place has struggled to attract visitors and revenue.
In the past year, Willowbrook saw about 6,000 visitors, but half were students on organized school trips. King said Willowbrook’s board has tried to attract major donors and more visitors, with little success. The village costs about $180,000 to $200,000 to run every year, including salaries for the small staff, and maintenance of the grounds and 20-plus structures.
Admission is $15 for adults and $8 for children. While an increase in visitors would help, it probably wouldn’t cover all costs, King and director Robert Schmick said. Willowbrook has been running deficits of about $50,000 a year for several years, King said. Founder Don King died in 1985 and his wife, Pan, died in 2003. They left an endowment that was used to offset shortfalls, but the recession of 2008 and the stock market plunge severely depleted the endowment.
Outdoor history museums often rely on endowments, but successful ones raise enough money through other means to keep the endowment from being used up, said Thomas Denenberg, director of the Shelburne Museum in Vermont and former chief curator of the Portland Museum of Art.
Denenberg said most outdoor history museums focused on American history began in the mid-20th century, following a European tradition of folk museums. Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia was an early one, starting in the 1920s. The Shelburne Museum, plus Old Sturbridge Village and Plimoth Plantation in Massachusetts, all started in the 1940s. The Shelburne Museum, which has 39 buildings, also started out with the vision of one person, art and antique collector Electra Havemeyer Webb, Denenberg said. It has an endowment, but also raises money through ticket sales, renting space for wedding events, and major fundraising efforts.
“Most of these outdoor history museums started as one person’s vision, or even obsession, but the ones we know now as institutions become a machine that runs itself, with an earned income stream,” Denenberg said.
One thing that makes Willowbrook stand out from many other history museums is that it is essentially a town. Elm Street in Newfield runs right through the middle of Willowbrook. Its 20 or so structures, including several historic buildings, line both sides of the road. The town post office is just a few doors down from the museum’s buildings. The village is not self-contained and closed off to traffic. Rather, visitors have to watch for speeding pickup trucks when they cross from one Willowbrook site to another.
The setting is pastoral. Visitors drive down the hill on Elm Street from Route 11 and see a bandstand on a town green in front of them. There’s also a mill pond, the 1813 Durgin family home, barns, a country store opened by Amos Straw in the 1830s and a little red schoolhouse. A stroll off Elm Street brings visitors to an old printer’s shop, barns with farm equipment, a cider press, a collection of antique carriages, a hands-on-history building and a replica of an old barber shop.
People can walk through the Durgin house and pick up the canes in the front hall or try on a hat hanging from a hook, besides seeing all the furnishings. Kids can wash clothes with a tub and hand wringer, or sit on old tractors, grind corn or ring the schoolhouse bell. They can work old-fashioned telegraph machines and talk on hand-cranked telephones. Very few spots in Willowbrook feel like a museum, in the traditional sense.
“My dad thought coming to a place like this should be viewed as entertainment, he wanted people to be able to touch things, crank things,” King said. “He didn’t want things roped off.”
Don King was born in 1913 and grew up in Wallingford, Connecticut, near New Haven, the son of a barber. He went to work during the Great Depression, serving for a time as a men’s clothing clerk. He later moved to New York City and eventually made his fortune by helping run a company that made industrial greases and lubricants. He and his family moved to Massachusetts and he started coming to Maine to hunt. He had a hunting cabin near Moosehead Lake but wanted to be closer to his home in Topsfield, Massachusetts. So he started looking for property in southern Maine.
He became enamored with Newfield, a rural old town in western York County, on the New Hampshire border. He bought the Durgin house and barns in the mid-’60s for use as a hunting lodge. But he also loved old tools and gadgets, his son said, and already had an antique car collection. In Newfield and surrounding towns, farmsteads were being broken up and sold off, and King spent many a day combing old barns and sometimes buying up most, if not all, of their contents.
By the late 1960s, he wanted to share his collection by displaying it for people around the property. He moved buildings to the property, and others were built to house his tools, furnishings and carriages. Willowbrook opened to the public in 1970.
“He loved to talk to people and loved tools and implements. He loved talking to farmers about their tools. He would find a really oddball tool and figure out what it did,” said his son, a retired architect who lives in New York City. “Then he’d go out and find 10 others just like it to see how it changed over the years.”
Given King’s passion for old farms and farm tools, his son is happy that the bulk of Willowbrook’s collection will be going to the Curran Homestead , a smaller outdoor history museum run by volunteers near Bangor. It’s been open for about 25 years.
Some of the collection will be donated to other Maine museums. The printer’s shop, with antique printing tools, will go to the Boothbay Railway Village. But Willowbrook’s pristine small-town location, the land and historic buildings, will eventually have to be leased or sold.
The Curran Homestead board is overseeing the property until the collection can be moved and the future of the buildings finalized, which could take up to five years. Next year the Curran board hopes to continue hosting school groups and events at Willowbrook, which will be renamed Curran Homestead Village at Newfield.
The Curran board plans to hire Schmick, who has been Willowbrook director since 2013, as its first full-time director. During his time at Willowbrook, Schmick has expanded the hands-on aspect of the museum. Curran board members feel, and King agrees, that the Orrington location might be better for a history museum than Newfield, because it is just off Interstate 95 and close to Greater Bangor, a population center. It’s also on the way to Acadia National Park, which attracts crowds of visitors each year.
Newfield, on the other hand, is more than an hour from Portland and I-95, via a jumble of less-traveled state roads. There is no direct way to get to Newfield from Portland, and it’s not on the way to any vacation destination.
“It’s an hour from Portland, but it’s a hard hour,” King said. “We can’t get bus tours to come, because they want to know if there are a couple other places they can stop at nearby. Unfortunately, there aren’t.” The good part in all this, King said, is that the collection will live on.
But Willowbrook, a place where generations of people could see and touch the history of small-town Maine in a setting that fit the story, will itself become history.
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NHS leadership needs to give staff a powerful voice in any system change

I nevitably the NHS reform drive got caught up in the party conference crossfire. Diane Abbott , in her last few days as shadow health secretary, attempted to rebrand sustainability and transformation plans (STPs) as “ secret Tory plans ”, while prime minister Theresa May made the ludicrous assertion that the government had given the NHS “more than its leaders asked for”, conjuring up an image of NHS England trying to work out what to do with all the extra cash.
But clinicians as well as politicians are becoming increasingly vocal on the current round of reform. The Royal College of GPs is getting angry over the obsessive focus on sorting out hospital deficits rather than transforming care. At their annual conference this week, college chair Maureen Baker accurately pointed out that if there is insufficient investment in general practice, system transformation simply won’t happen, and the whole process will have been in vain.
NHS England has expressed concern about the lack of clinical involvement in drawing up local plans. At the recent NHS Expo, chief nursing officer Professor Jane Cummings revealed that she had had “ mixed responses ” when pushing for nurses to have a greater role in STPs, and urged healthcare professionals to make their voices heard.
The RCN backs the drive for patients to increasingly manage their own care, but has warned that the only way to do that effectively is to listen to patients and clinicians. In many areas this did not happen before the plans were submitted to NHS England.
The extraordinary speed with which the plans are being put together is causing concern. Last week Julia Simon, who has just finished as the head of commissioning policy at NHS England, went so far as to claim there were “a lot of lies in the system about the … benefits that will be delivered; it’s just a construct, not a reality”. She described the speed as “mad” and “shameful”.
NHS England is rushing the process for a reason. As NHS Improvement chief executive Jim Mackey made clear from his first days in the job, it would be a calamitous failure for the NHS to push the Department of Health over its parliamentary spending limit. The possible consequences are far greater than simply NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens losing his job; it could lead to a fundamental change in the relationship between frontline health services and government.
Despite Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt’s determination to keep a personal grip on the health service, and despite the numerous weaknesses in the current structure, the NHS does at least have a meaningful degree of autonomy from direct Whitehall control. Busting the spending limit runs the serious risk that this would be reversed, to the detriment of the whole system.
But NHS England and NHS improvement need to balance the need for quick action to stabilise the finances with acceptance that the only way to deliver the transformation they seek is for it to be led by clinicians as much as managers.
STPs are focused on structures and process, but as thousands of pages of visions and plans that have come to little over the years demonstrate, documents like these are ultimately worthless without clinical buy-in and leadership, because they all depend on clinicians taking different decisions with their patients on the best way forward.
The frenetic pace of the STP process gives the erroneous impression that, at least for the most advanced areas, it will all be over by Christmas. In reality, this is just the beginning of many years of work to change the culture of the entire health and care system.
Once the immediate panic over getting financial plans in place has subsided, the NHS leadership needs to focus relentlessly on giving staff a powerful voice in system change. Clinicians need to be empowered and supported in making the improvements that they know are needed, while also being challenged to develop their thinking around crucial areas such as building services around the needs of the patients rather than the institution.
Either clinicians start to lead this, or it will fail.
Join the Healthcare Professionals Network to read more pieces like this. And follow us on Twitter ( @GdnHealthcare ) to keep up with the latest healthcare news and views.

 

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UN calls on Saudi Arabia to stop torturing, executing minors in scathing report — RT News

On Thursday, the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) published  a report  on Saudi Arabia’s track record in enforcing the Convention on the Rights of the Child, to which it is a party.
Upon reviewing the kingdom’s government policy towards children, who are defined as individuals under 18 years old for the purposes of the convention, the committee urged Saudi authorities to revise its legislation “without any further delay… with a view to unambiguously prohibit the imposition of death sentence on children ” pursuant to the convention.
The document noted that minors in Saudi Arabia can stand trial as adults after they reach the age of 15, and that Saudi courts issue and carry out death sentences “after trials falling short of guarantees of a due process and fair trial… especially as concerns the absolute prohibition of torture.”
“The Committee is particularly concerned that out of the 47 persons executed on 2 January 2016, at least four, namely Ali al Ribh, Mohammad Fathi, Mustafa Akbar and Amin al-Ghamadi were under the age of 18 when sentenced to death by the Specialized Criminal Court,” the report says.
The 18-member committee also strongly criticized Saudi Arabia’s traditional practices of punishing perpetrators with stoning, flogging, and limb amputation, demanding that it “repeal all provisions contained in legislation” authorizing such penalties.
The ultra-conservative Middle Eastern country appeared to be undeterred in the face of the accusations, however. In its official reply to the report from August, the country reiterated its right to hold children aged 15 and above criminally responsible for committing certain types of offences, citing sharia (Islamic law) norms that the Saudis say cannot be overridden.
“No authority in the State has the power to modify or suspend the punishment prescribed for crimes of qisas (murder and assault) and crimes of hudud (those for which there are specified penalties in the Quran and Sunna), as these are categorically set forth in Islamic sharia and leave no leeway for interpretation,” reads the report by Bandar Bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, chairman of the Saudi Human Rights Commission.
“Islamic sharia (law) was above all laws and treaties, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child,” Reuters cited  him as saying.
Besides, treating children as adults, the report blamed Saudi Arabia for refusing to grant girls rights equal to those of their male peers, saying that, instead, it continues to “severely discriminate [against] them in law and practice and to impose on them a system of male guardianship,” Jorge Cardona, a member of the committee, pointed out.
According to Saudi Arabia’s interpretation of Islamic law, underage girls as young as nine or ten years old can be married off, Cardona says, adding that this “poses a concrete problem for rights protected by the convention.”
The report calls on the Saudi government to abolish “all forms of discrimination against girls” and “address the persistent negative gender stereotypes” that result in young women being abused and discriminated against.
READ MORE: Saudi women file 'enslaving' petition to challenge sexist law
The committee also weighed in on the ongoing Saudi-led offensive in Yemen, which it noted has contributed to the death and suffering of many children.
In a study recently conducted by the Yemen Data Project, it was revealed that the Saudi-coalition’s bombing campaign in Yemen, which supports the ousted government of Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, has struck more non-military targets than military ones in five of the last 18 months, with one third targeting civilian infrastructure such as schools and hospitals.
According to UNICEF, 1.5 million children in Yemen are suffering from malnutrition, with 370,000 cases severe enough to be life threatening.

 

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Wis. officials acknowledge DMV made mistakes about voter ID rules

MADISON, Wis. Wisconsin Division of Motor Vehicles employees gave inaccurate information to people seeking voting credentials, attorneys for the state acknowledged Friday night while maintaining that media reports exaggerated the problems and that transportation officials have implemented changes to streamline the application process. The filing said undercover state troopers were given correct information this week and the Wisconsin Department of Transportation has updated training protocols as well as created specialists to help applicants. A judge had ordered the state to report on how its voter ID law is being administered following the release of audio recordings that revealed DMV workers giving inaccurate information to people seeking voting credentials in lieu of photo identification. The filing figures to be a key piece of evidence as U. S. District Judge James Peterson holds a hearing Wednesday to consider a request to invalidate Wisconsin’s voter ID law completely because the Transportation Department has failed to administer it properly. 
North Carolina's law requiring voters to show photo ID was overturned Friday by a federal appeals court. The court cited discriminatory requireme...
Wisconsin law requires voters to show government-approved photo ID at the polls. People who lack such identification can obtain free photo IDs at DMV field stations. In May, the Transportation Department adopted regulations allowing people who lack the supporting documents - such as birth certificates - needed to obtain an ID to get a receipt they can use for voting. The provisions were designed to blunt a pair of lawsuits alleging voters who lack supporting documents face hurdles in obtaining free IDs. Peterson ruled in July that the process for obtaining the receipts was a “wretched failure” because it still left minority citizens unable to obtain IDs. He ordered the state to quickly issue receipts to anyone who applies for one. The Nation published a story last week alleging DMV workers told a man named Zack Moore that he couldn’t obtain a receipt because he lacked a birth certificate and the way IDs were being handled was still up in the air. The magazine also reported that Molly McGrath, the national campaign coordinator with VoteRiders, visited 10 DMV stations where employees gave people varying answers about how long it would take to get a receipt. Peterson ordered the state to investigate the allegations and turn in a report by Friday. Since then, liberal group One Wisconsin Institute has asked Peterson to invalidate the entire voter ID law. The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a similar demand with a federal appellate court in a separate case challenging voter ID. Gov. Scott Walker, who signed the voter ID requirement into law in 2011, told reporters Friday morning that the investigation had found problems with how the credential process was being administered but didn’t elaborate. Republicans such as Walker who support the law contend it will combat voter fraud, although nothing suggests widespread voter fraud exists in the state. State attorneys argued in their court filing that Peterson can’t block the law because it’s been upheld by multiple courts. The employees who dealt with Moore should have told him he could get a voting receipt within six days, the report said. However, they thought he was trying to obtain a permanent ID and could easily get his birth certificate. Media accounts of Moore’s interactions don’t mention that he never asked for an ID for voting and a receipt wasn’t mentioned until McGrath, who was accompanying Moore, interjected, according to the state’s filing. As for allegations of inaccurate information at other DMV stations, the report said only two people were actually trying to obtain an ID and the other interactions involved a volunteer posing hypothetical questions about an absent relative. One of the real customers was issued a receipt after talking to a second worker; the other customer applied for a receipt and was told she would get one within a week, the report said. The filing says the Transportation Department sent state troopers posing as customers to 31 DMV stations Tuesday and Wednesday. They were given receipt application forms and told they would have the credentials within a week. The report said the DMV has implemented new protocols over the last week, including new training for field staff; creating a receipt specialist to help applicants at the 30 DMV stations open five days per week; instructing staff at part-time service centers to contact a hotline for help processing applicants; and setting up a hotline for questions. One Wisconsin Institute Executive Director Scot Ross said in a statement Friday evening that the voter ID law is a failure and voters are being misinformed.

 

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Northern Ireland manager Michael O'Neill ready for two very different tests against San Marino and Germany

Northern Ireland will be presented with different challenges when facing San Marino and Germany over four days, yet Michael O'Neill is confident his squad are prepared for the contrasting tests. San Marino and the Germans are separated by 198 places in the FIFA world rankings, with the former having never won a competitive game and the latter losing just two of 85 World Cup qualifiers in their history. O'Neill's side therefore head into Saturday's clash with San Marino in Belfast expected to win comfortably before they must batten down the hatches in Hannover against the world champions. 'That transition is the most difficult part of international football,' O'Neill said. 'I always remember the first game in charge where we were away to (Fabio) Capello's Russia and had to be difficult to beat and then we had to get back from Russia, turn the team around and play Luxembourg here with a totally different approach and different personnel. 'We're a lot better equipped for that now. I think we also benefit from the fact that it's only three months or so since we played Germany in Paris. So we know what to expect. 'It's the difference in terms of changes of personnel that will be important in that game as well. Whilst it is a difficult task, and it's made more difficult because there's a day less, but our focus is to win the first game. 'The most important part of any game, more than being tactically ready, is being mentally right and if you win the first game you'll be mentally right for the second.' There will be an extra motivation for Northern Ireland to record the victory on home soil too given it is the first international hosted at Windsor Park since its redevelopment was finished. And O'Neill hopes the renovated home can continue to create positive memories on the back of their run to the Euro 2016 knockout stages. 'Windsor had a slow death, let's be honest,' O'Neill added regarding the two-and-a-half-year project to rejuvenate their home. 'Bit by bit, it was closed off but the redevelopment has been fantastic and it's a fresh start on the back of the team's success at Euro 2016. 'It's a big plus, not only for the national team but the domestic game here as well.'

 

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Iconic Windows service host process will be discontinued

Microsoft plans a nice surprise for its Windows 10 users. In the latest Windows Insider Build analysts see very important tweaks applied to background processes and the death of a beloved icon: the venerable box-with-a-swirl Windows update icon is now replaced by an icon of an isosceles trapezoid with arrows inside.
The biggest change of them all is that a process we all know by the name of svchost.exe will be forever gone. Microsoft has fundamentally changed how Windows 10 will handle background processes in order to enhance performance for higher-end systems. Windows started bundling processes into service hosts because of different memory-saving advantages. Nowadays we all have a lot more memory than we used to. Breaking down the service hosts into individual processes will lead to an overall increase in the operating system's reliability.
Microsoft engineer, Dona Sarkar, shared the first thoughts on this change in a blog post today: "If your PC has 3.5+ GB of memory, you may notice an increased number of processes in Task Manager. While this change may look concerning at first glance, many will be excited to find out the motivation behind this change". What is more important is that this update will likely also address some security concerns. Having separate processes means they are easier to troubleshoot and the operating system is more robust and less prone to security vulnerabilities by keeping each process isolated from one another. Naturally, critical system services will remain grouped.

 

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Thierry Fremaux on Tarantino, Winding Refn, Deneuve, Noe

LYON, France — Could Lyon’s Lumière Festival – an event dedicated near entirely to classic movies – be shaping up, outside animation, as France’s second biggest film festival? Last year, it ratcheted up 150,000 admissions. In 2016, it has a guest list most festivals would die for: Quentin Tarantino, Nicolas Winding Refn, Park Chan-wook, Gong Li, Gaspar Noe, Walter Hill, Jerry Schatzberg and the French film greats led by Catherine Deneuve,  Costa Gavras and Jean-Paul Jeunet and, in industry terms, Nicolas and Jerome Seydoux, heads of Gaumont and Pathe respectively. Not forgetting the Institute Lumière’s Bertrand Tavernier and Thierry Fremaux which run and host the affair. “Host” may be an appropriate word. Fremaux insists the festival should be a ‘feast,’ a fiesta. The Lumière Festival unspools as several hundred live shows, where directors, actors, critics and quite often Bertrand Tavernier – who sometimes seems to remember more about films than the people who made them – talk about films they feel passionate about, often not their own. Here, on the eve of the 8th Lumière Festival, Fremaux explains the dynamics and attraction of that system, also talks with passion about his guests and his cornerstone belief in film as a communal experience – the Lumières’ essential invention – and how cinema can influence lives:
Film festivals editions are like vintages. What could or is special about 2016’s Lumière Festival?
Thierry Fremaux: What’s special? It’s a woman’s edition this year, not only because of Catherine Deneuve’s Lumière Award, but also the Dorothy Arzner tribute and the great retrospective called Hollywood, the City of Women, using the Fellini title. It’s really about all these actresses of the 1930s, ’40, and ‘50s. Because, apart from Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Katherine Hepburn or Marilyn Monroe, many of these women are not so well-known now, so we wanted to go back to them. It’s a wonderful retrospective with a lot of great movies.
Then we have many restored prints. We have lots of good new things, the new print of Jerry Schatzberg’s “The Panic in Needle Park,” the new print of “Manhattan” in digital. And we’re delighted to have Park Chan-wook. Asian cinema is more and more part of the cinephilia for young movie buffs today, which was not the case 30 years ago except for Japanese cinema. Now you have Chinese and Korean cinema, Taiwan cinema. It’s very important.
But I’d say the festival is special in itself because of the disaster of the world. It is more and more important to have these kinds of cultural events. We want this event to be a very popular and happy one, giving memory of the past and relaying it to the future. And being all together: Artists, journalists, people, and art and film. Maybe what is special in a way is that more and more we want to make the festival like a feast, something which is packed by emotion, tenderness, respect and admiration. Over the last three months, lots of people told us that the festival had become more important to them. Of course, we are in Lyon. There are hundreds and thousands of festivals in the world. Everywhere they are very important.
I am struck by the number of stars, actors, directors who are coming to present films or give master classes. Are they presenting more films than usual? 
Yes and no. More and more after seven years, artists come to Lyon, present films like normal people. But they are not normal, they are artists. That’s why their words about art and film are so important. Of course a lot of movie directors, like Martin Scorsese last year, are movie buffs. Jean-Pierre Jeunet, example, has a large admiration for Marcel Carné. There are also actors and actresses, though not known for it, but who are movie buffs: Vincent Lindon, as you say, is a great movie buff. It’s such a gift to have someone introducing the film which is directed or performed by someone else. It is a good sign of how devoted people of cinema are to cinema. This festival is not about the past, it’s about how the past is important for the present and future. The last thing is the audience. We will have 150,000 people in one week, paying tickets, going back to being in a theater together. What the Lumières invented 121 years, going to see a movie in a cinema theater, is still going strong. Watching a film on a big screen in front of 5,000 people on the Festival’s opening night: That is still an unforgettable experience.
Your attendance hit 150,000 last year, right? 
Yes, it’s a sign of people still loving cinema, that they are still intelligent and full of culture and curiosity.
The master classes are for the general public as well?
Yes, all are for the public. It’s a privileged moment to spend an hour or two with a movie star. Also to listen. I want to know what Walter Hill has to say. It will be very interesting. Or Catherine Deneuve, for example. She is not at all out of it. She’s very grounded, involved in daily life, she talks about flowers, antique furniture.
After seven years, you also have repeat collaborations and presences. Quentin Tarantino is programming a section which is typically eclectic where you have “Hollywood Vixens” and “Love Story.”
Yes. You look at his list and you want to know why he picked this film or that.
And you have another highlight, Nicolas Winding Refn, presenting his second, “lost” film, “Bleeder,” which I think was only distributed in parts of Scandinavia, and one other country.
It’s a way to have him back. It will be good he was in competition again in Cannes. But he’ll come to Lyon not as the guy who was in competition but as the young guy who directed this very early film.
You also have another filmmaker who obviously has a long part of his career ahead of him who is Gasper Noe.
Yes, we are not a festival of history, we are about cinema. Gaspar is a cult director but, as Jean-Luc Godard used to say about his own movies, his films are not seen by a lot of people. Gaston is a cult director for a lot of other directors. His films are not very commercially successful, but more and more time is proving him right. We are going to talk about that with him. Gaspar works like a painter. His editing, the way he makes his film is like a painter, working in his place, adding more blue, more red, shorter, longer. That will be interesting because we are living in a world which is increasingly divided in two parts. Big and small. In the 70s and maybe he will talk about that, cinema managed to be in between. And of course New Hollywood was about making films which were in the middle, rising to the top. Now it’s more and more difficult to get to the top. Except when you have Cannes, Berlin, Telluride, Toronto, or Venice, or a festival like Lumière.
Do you feel that maybe the major challenge, not so much for the festival but for the classic film sector at large, is for other countries outside the U. S. to enjoy the vibrancy of the French classic film sector, which has 30-or-more distributors and the Lumière Festival, for that to be replicated around the world?
Yes. There are a lot of new countries in the market this year. Every country in the world has a history of cinema, of films, and wants to pay attention to their patrimony, their legacy. That is why we have this market also, it’s a way of showing that what we are doing we can do everywhere. We hope to maybe have other Lumière Festivals everywhere.
Another challenge which festivals have is that they can be very successful, have a lot of people going, and the rest of the year the art cinemas in the city where they take place are almost empty. I think one thing you have tried to do at the Institute Lumière is to avoid that by buying some cinemas and trying to make cinema part of every week life.
Sure, I am quite proud of that. What we have done with Bertrand Tavernier over the last 30 years is to give back a reputation to the birthplace of cinema, the city of Lyon, the name of Lumiere. We wanted to build a museum in the birthplace of cinema where you can go and see the great films of the past. Then we wanted to have an event. Now having this event, which is very successful, you are right, it’s not enough to make an event, we have to do it every day 12 months a year. It’s not about a cultured audience, the movie buffs, it’s putting cinema in the schools, suburbs, that’s why it’s very important the presence of artists who to go and talk to young people, the sort of youth which sometimes is not at all connected with cinema and culture. We also go to see sick children, we show films in  hospitals. We go to the prisons, to see people there and talk cinema with them. I think where we are in a way is trying to influence life. Cinema is a good method to do that.

 

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Pia Miller gives fans a glimpse of her toned midriff

Pia arrived at Hayman Island, off the coast of Queensland, last week for a girls' weekend. She soaked up the last of the long weekend sun on Monday before flying back to Sydney the following day. Posing for a photo shared with her 464,000 Instagram followers, Pia showed off her sun-kissed frame as she relaxed on a sunbed. She looked effortlessly chic in an off-the-shoulder white sun dress which showed off her bronzed skin. Pia brought attention to her silky décolletage by accessorising the linen dress with a thin gold choker necklace. She let her thick brunette tresses, every so slightly lightened by the sun, fall in beachy waves over her shoulders. The mother-of-two showed off her foot tattoo as she posed barefoot for the photo. Earlier on Monday, she showed off her angelic side as she posed in a black bikini and a crown made of shells. Pia, who plays Kat Chapman on Home And Away, looked every inch the island goddess as her salty hair swayed in the breeze. On Sunday, Pia stripped down to a skimpy two-piece to enjoy a bottle of champagne at the beach with her female friends.

 

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WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:
RACE and POLICING
The continued deaths of unarmed African-American men women and children at the hands of police are turning into one of the most consequential civil rights issues of the new millennium. Since the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the sharing of video-recorded deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement has sparked unrest in many cities around the country, and prompted calls for additional training and more monitoring of police forces.
Hillary Clinton has offered specific proposals, including legislation that would help end racial profiling, providing federal matching funds for more police body cameras and overhauling mandatory minimum sentencing.
Donald Trump has described himself as the "law and order" candidate, and has not specifically addressed plans on race and policing. He endorsed a former New York City police policy called "stop and frisk" after unrest in Charlotte, North Carolina, over the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.
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ISLAMIC STATE
As Islamic State militants suffer setbacks in Iraq and Syria, they are becoming more intent on inspiring lone-wolf attacks, already seen in the U. S. and Europe.
The group seized swaths of land in Iraq and expanded its territory in Syria in a dramatic blitz in 2014. The militant group slaughtered civilians in its march to try and establish a radical caliphate, and has spawned a string of deadly attacks across Europe, the Middle East and the United States.
Besides holding major cities in Iraq and Syria, the group has either claimed responsibility or been linked as a possible inspiration for the November attacks in Paris; the mass shootings in San Bernardino, California; the subway and airport bombings in Brussels; the Orlando nightclub shootings; and the Bastille Day truck attack in Nice, France.
Hillary Clinton's plan to deal with the IS threat abroad and at home mostly embraces what President Barack Obama is doing. Donald Trump has vowed relentless bombing and expressed support for enhanced interrogation techniques. Other details are lacking.
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ISRAEL
Support for Israel has been a mainstay of American foreign policy since the Jewish state's creation in 1948. Despite occasionally strong and even pointed differences, successive U. S. administrations of both parties have steadily increased financial, military and diplomatic assistance to Israel over the past six decades.
The U. S. now provides Israel with roughly $3 billion every year, making it the largest single recipient of American foreign aid, and the Obama administration boosted that amount to $3.8 billion with a new memorandum of understanding on defense.
Debate over Washington's pro-Israel position has intensified in recent years — notably over the Iran nuclear deal that Israel opposes, failed efforts to forge an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal and Israel's continued construction in territory claimed by the Palestinians. But the Democratic and Republican parties and their presidential candidates have never wavered from that stance and strong congressional backing for Israel makes any significant change in policy unlikely.
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TAXES
Presidents like to try reshaping the tax code to make substantive changes in fiscal policy and to show voters their priorities.
Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have made clear that that's just what they want to do. There's an enormous difference between their approaches and goals.
Trump, the Republican, is intent on cutting taxes. He'd collapse the current seven income tax brackets, which peak at 39.6 percent, into just three tiers with a top rate of 33 percent, slice the corporate income tax and eliminate the estate tax. Analysts say the wealthy would benefit disproportionately.
Clinton, the Democrat, is proposing tax increases on the rich, including a minimum 30 percent tax on incomes over $1 million and higher taxes on big inheritances. Most taxpayers would see little or no impact on their tax bill, but the government might look different. She'd use the added revenue to expand domestic programs.
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GUNS:
The right to bear arms is carved into the Constitution and seemingly embedded in the national DNA. But after a seemingly endless stretch of violence, Americans are confronting how far those rights extend.
Do Americans have the right to have AR-style firearms, the long guns with a military look used in the past year in several mass shootings? Should they be able to buy magazines that hold 10 or more bullets? Should every gun buyer have to pass a background check?
Donald Trump casts himself as an ardent protector of gun rights and proclaims that if more "good guys" were armed there would be fewer gun tragedies.
Hillary Clinton wants to renew an expired ban on assault-type weapons instituted when her husband was president. She's also called for measures to ensure background checks are completed before a gun sale goes forward, mandating such checks for gun-show sales and repealing a law that shields gun manufacturers from liability.
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RUSSIA
Russia is reasserting itself, posing vexing questions for the U. S. and a presidential field seemingly split on Vladimir Putin.
After briefly looking inward during much of President Barack Obama's first term, Russia has returned to the international stage with force under Putin.
Russia is militarily involved in Syria, supports separatists in eastern Ukraine and areas of Georgia and has even been accused of trying to meddle in the U. S. presidential race. At the same time, the U. S. has been forced to accept that working with Russia is probably the only way to achieve results on many complicated international issues. Thus, Russia was central in the Iran nuclear negotiations and is a player as well as negotiator in the Syria truce effort.
Donald Trump advocates improved relations with Russia and has been strikingly complimentary of Putin's strong leadership style.
Hillary Clinton has had direct negotiating experience with Putin and his aides and that has left her wary of cooperating with Moscow. She promises to stand up to Putin and deter Russian aggression in Europe.
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JOBS
Tepid income growth and a smaller share of the population at work have kept many Americans anxious about jobs and the economy, seven years after the Great Recession ended.
And most jobs that pay decent wages require more education than in the past, leaving many workers feeling left behind.
Donald Trump says he would cut regulations and taxes to spur more hiring, and renegotiate or withdraw from trade agreements to bring jobs back to the U. S.
Hillary Clinton says she would spend more on roads, tunnels, and other infrastructure and make state colleges and universities tuition free to most students.
Even though hiring has been healthy for the past six years, incomes have lagged. A typical household didn't see its income recover to pre-recession levels until just this past July. And the proportion of Americans working or looking for work remains below pre-recession levels, as some of the unemployed have given up searching for jobs.
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SOCIAL SECURITY
Big changes are coming to Social Security, sooner or later.
If left to later, those changes promise to be wrenching.
The trustees who oversee the program say it has enough money to pay full benefits until 2034. But at that point, Social Security will collect only enough taxes to pay 79 percent of benefits. Unless Congress acts, millions of people on fixed incomes would get an automatic 21 percent cut in benefits.
Social Security's financial problems might seem far off. But the longer Congress waits to act, the harder it will be to save Social Security without dramatic tax increases, big benefit cuts or some combination.
Hillary Clinton has proposed expanding Social Security benefits for widows and family caregivers. She says she would preserve Social Security by requiring "the wealthiest" to pay Social Security taxes on more of their income. Republican Donald Trump has promised not to cut Social Security. He's suggested he'd revisit the program after his tax-cut plan boosts economic growth.
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EXECUTIVE AUTHORITY
"Your Majesty" isn't in the American political lexicon. But when a president sets a major policy by edict, skirting Congress, it sets off a debate that traces back to the time of kings and queens — and the Founding Fathers who rejected the authority of the crown. Lawmakers cry foul when a president, especially of the other party, usurps their authority through executive action. Defenders say it can be the only way to get something done when Congress is gridlocked.
President Barack Obama has used executive authority expansively, most notably on immigration.
Donald Trump says he'd make sure Obama's "unconstitutional actions" never come back. But some Republicans worry Trump, too, might pursue an "imperial presidency. " Hillary Clinton supported Obama's unilateral move to curb deportation of millions of immigrants in the U. S. country illegally. The Supreme Court deadlocked in June over the major portion of the immigration executive actions, effectively killing the plan for the rest of Obama's presidency.
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MINIMUM WAGE
Modest income gains, strikes by fast-food workers, the rapid growth of low-paying jobs while middle-income work shrinks. These factors have combined to make the minimum wage a top economic issue for the 2016 campaign.
Millions would benefit from higher pay, of course. But an increase in the minimum wage would also boost costs for employers and may slow hiring.
Hillary Clinton supports raising the minimum wage at least to $12 an hour, even higher at state and local levels. Donald Trump has said he supports an increase to $10, but thinks states should "really call the shots. " It's $7.25 now.
Why the momentum for higher minimums? The typical household's income has fallen 2.4 percent since 1999. Low-paying industries, such as retail, fast food and home health care aides, are among the largest and fastest-growing. And many low-wage workers are older, have families and are probably more willing to demand higher pay.
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WALL STREET REGULATION
The debate over rules governing banks and the markets comes down to this: how to prevent another economic catastrophe like the Great Recession ignited by the financial crisis in 2008. The worst upheaval since the 1930s Depression wiped out $11 trillion in U. S. household wealth and about 8 million jobs. More than 5 million families lost their homes to foreclosure.
The economic recovery over eight years has been halting and slow.
The goal behind the most radical overhaul of financial rules since the 1930s was to rein in high-risk practices on Wall Street and prevent another multibillion-dollar taxpayer bailout of banks. In the package of rules Congress enacted in 2010, regulators gained new tools to shut banks without resorting to bailouts. Risky lending was restricted and a new federal agency was charged with protecting consumers from deceptive marketing of financial products.
Republicans and many in the business community say the restrictions have raised costs for banks, especially smaller ones. They want the overhaul law repealed. Donald Trump calls it a "disaster," saying he would dismantle most of it.
Hillary Clinton says the financial rules should be preserved and strengthened.
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INFRASTRUCTURE
The nation's infrastructure is in need of repair and improvement. On that, politicians generally agree. Harder to answer: How to pay for it and which projects should take priority?
A reliable infrastructure system is important for the nation's economy, safety and quality of life.
Public health can be put at risk by poor infrastructure, such as the lead-tainted pipes that contaminated the water supply of Flint, Michigan.
Poorly maintained highways and congested traffic also can raise the cost of shipping goods and the price consumers pay.
A recent report by the American Society of Civil Engineers projects the U. S. will face a $1.4 trillion funding gap for its infrastructure by 2025.
Democrat Hillary Clinton wants to spend $250 billion over the next five years on public infrastructure and direct an additional $25 billion to a new infrastructure bank to help finance local projects. Republican Donald Trump has said he wants to spend at least double that amount on infrastructure, financed with bonds. Whoever becomes president, it's a staggering amount of money for the federal treasury to put out — if Congress goes along.
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IRAN
Last year's nuclear deal with Tehran has removed for now the threat of a U. S.-Iranian military confrontation. But the deal rests on shaky ground.
The accord curtailed Iran's nuclear program, pulling it back from atomic weapons capability in exchange for the end of many economic sanctions.
But the next president could have his or her hands full, dealing with Iran in general and the agreement in particular. Various restrictions on Iran start ending in about seven years.
For Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, it's basically a question of continuity versus change.
As secretary of state, Clinton helped lay the groundwork for the pact. She supports it, while taking a generally tougher tone on Iran than President Barack Obama.
Trump hates the deal. But he contends that he can renegotiate its terms.
Both are prepared to use force to prevent Tehran from acquiring the bomb. If the deal collapses or expires without sufficient safeguards, that possibility is back in play.
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REFUGEES
With millions of Syrians displaced by a years-long war and hundreds of thousands of people fleeing to Europe, countries around the world are being pressed to help resettle people seeking refuge.
The United States pledged to accept 10,000 such refugees by the end of the budget year in September and did so, a month early.
Republicans have balked at the idea of allowing people from Syria into the United States and Donald Trump has called for a halt on refugee resettlement for them. He says vetting of these refugees is inadequate.
Hillary Clinton has pledged to expand the Syrian refugee program and allow as many as 65,000 such refugees into the United States.
The fate of the program almost certainly hinges on the outcome of the November election.
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CHILD CARE/PAY EQUITY
In much of the U. S., families spend more on child care for two kids than on housing. And if you're a woman, it's likely you earn less than your male colleagues. That's according to the latest research, which suggests that while the U. S. economy has improved, women and their families are still struggling to make the numbers work.
Clinton wants a 12-week government-paid family and medical leave program, guaranteeing workers two-thirds of their wages up to a certain amount. Trump proposes six weeks of leave for new mothers, with the government paying wages equivalent to unemployment benefits. Both candidates propose tax relief for child care costs. Trump's plan provides for a new income tax deduction for child care expenses, other tax benefits and a new rebate or tax credit for low-income families. Clinton says no family should spend more than 10 percent of its income on child care and has called for child-care subsidies and tax relief offered on a sliding scale.
Clinton also favors forcing businesses to disclose gender pay data to the government for analysis. Trump says only that working moms should be "fairly compensated. "
Women comprise about 57 percent of the labor force and many of them have young children. If they aren't getting paid enough to make ends meet, more families will seek out government aid programs or low-quality, unlicensed daycares for their children.
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EDUCATION
Education is a core issue not just for students and families, but for communities, the economy, and the nation as a global competitor.
The country has some 50 million K-12 students. Teaching them, preparing them for college and careers, costs taxpayers more than $580 billion a year, or about $11,670 per pupil per year. A better education usually translates into higher earnings.
And while high school graduations are up sharply and dropout rates down, the nation has a ways to go to match the educational outcomes elsewhere. American schoolchildren trail their counterparts in Japan, Korea, Germany, France and more.
For students seeking higher education, they face rising college costs and many are saddled with debt.
Hillary Clinton has proposed free tuition at in-state public colleges and universities for working families with incomes up to $125,000 — free for families, that is, not for taxpayers. Donald Trump has focused on school choice, recently proposing to spend $20 billion in his first year in office to expand programs that let low-income families send their children to the local public, private, charter or magnet school that they think is best.
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STUDENT DEBT
More Americans are getting buried by student debt — causing delays in home ownership, limiting how much people can save and leaving taxpayers at risk as many loans go unpaid.
Student debt now totals around $1.26 trillion. This amounts to a stunning 350 percent increase since 2005, according to the New York Federal Reserve.
More than 60 percent of the class of 2014 graduated with debt that averaged nearly $27,000, according to the College Board. Not all that taxpayer-backed debt is getting repaid. Out of the 43 million Americans with student debt, roughly 16 percent are in long-term default — a potential hit in excess of $100 billion that taxpayers would absorb.
Democrat Hillary Clinton proposes no tuition for students from families making less than $85,000 who go to an in-state, public college. Republican Donald Trump has promised a "great" student debt plan, details to come.
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IMMIGRATION
The future of millions of people living in the U. S. illegally could well be shaped by the presidential election. The stakes are high, too, for those who employ them, help them fit into neighborhoods, or want them gone.
Republican Donald Trump at first pledged to deport the estimated 11 million immigrants in the country illegally. Not only that, he'd build a wall all along the Mexican border. But his position has evolved. He's sticking to his vow to build the wall and make Mexico pay. But he's no longer proposing to deport people who have not committed crimes beyond their immigration offences. Still, he's not proposing a way for people living in the country illegally to gain legal status.
Democrat Hillary Clinton, in contrast, would overhaul immigration laws to include a path to citizenship, not just legal status.
Illegal immigration has been at nearly 40-year lows for several years. It even appears that Mexican migration trends have reversed, with more Mexicans leaving the U. S. than arriving. Billions of dollars have been spent in recent years to build fencing, improve border technology and expand the Border Patrol.
Nonetheless the Mexican border remains a focal point for those who argue that the country is not secure.
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CLIMATE CHANGE
It's as if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton live on two entirely different Earths: one warming, one not. Clinton says climate change threatens us all, while Trump repeatedly tweets that global warming is a hoax.
Measurements and scientists say Clinton's Earth is much closer to the warming reality. And it is worsening.
The world is on pace for the hottest year on record, breaking marks set in 2015, 2014, and 2010. It is about 1.8 degrees warmer than a century ago.
But it's more than temperatures. Scientists have connected man-made climate change to deadly heat waves, droughts and flood-inducing downpours.
Studies say climate change is raising sea levels, melting ice and killing coral. It's making people sicker with asthma and allergies and may eventually shrink our bank accounts.
The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences says warming can be highly damaging to people and the planet and potentially irreversible.
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ROLE OF GOVERNMENT
It's the Goldilocks conundrum of American politics: Is the government too big, too small or just right? Every four years, the presidential election offers a referendum on whether Washington should do more or less.
Donald Trump favors cutting regulation and has promised massive tax cuts, but his plans are expected to add trillions to the national debt. Unlike most conservatives, he supports eminent domain and has spoken positively about government-run health care. And don't forget that massive border wall. Hillary Clinton has vowed new spending on education and infrastructure that could grow government, too. She strongly supports "Obamacare," which most small government proponents see as overreach.
At its heart, the debate about government's reach pits the desire to know your basic needs will be cared for against the desire to be left alone. For the last few decades, polls have found Americans generally feel frustrated by the federal government and think it's wasteful. A smaller government sounds good to a lot of people until they're asked what specific services or benefits they are willing to do without.
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DEBT
The federal government is borrowing about one out of seven dollars it spends and steadily piling up debt. Over the long term, that threatens the economy and people's pocketbooks.
Most economists say rising debt risks crowding out investment and forcing interest rates up, among other problems. At the same time, rapidly growing spending on federal health care programs like Medicare and the drain on Social Security balances caused by the rising tide of baby boomers could squeeze out other spending, on roads, education, the armed forces and more.
It takes spending cuts, tax increases or both to dent the deficit. Lawmakers instead prefer higher spending and tax cuts.
Neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump has focused on the debt.
Trump has promised massive tax cuts that would drive up the debt and he's shown little interest in curbing expensive benefit programs like Medicare.
Clinton, by contrast, is proposing tax increases on the wealthy. But she wouldn't use the money to bring down the debt. Instead, she'd turn around and spend it on college tuition subsidies, infrastructure and health care.
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TRADE
In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade — or hostile to it.
The backlash threatens a pillar of U. S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade.
Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U. S. more efficient.
But unease has simmered, especially as American workers faced competition from low-wage Chinese labor. Last year, the U. S. ran a $334 billion trade deficit with China — $500 billion with the entire world.
The Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are both playing to public suspicions about trade deals. Hillary Clinton broke with President Barrack Obama by opposing an Asia-Pacific trade agreement that she had supported as secretary of state.
Donald Trump vows to tear up existing trade deals and to slap huge tariffs on Chinese imports.
But trade deals have far less impact on jobs than forces such as automation and wage differences between countries. Trump's plans to impose tariffs could start a trade war and raise prices.
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SUPREME COURT
The ideological direction of the Supreme Court is going to tip one way or the other after the election. The outcome could sway decisions on issues that profoundly affect everyday Americans: immigration, gun control, climate change and more.
The court has been operating with eight justices since Antonin Scalia died in February. His successor appears unlikely to be confirmed until after the election, at the earliest. The court is split between four Democratic-appointed, liberal justices and four conservatives who were appointed by Republicans — although Justice Anthony Kennedy has sided with the liberals on abortion, same-sex marriage and affirmative action in the past two years.
The ninth justice will push the court left or right, depending on whether Democrat Hillary Clinton or Republican Donald Trump becomes president. President Barack Obama has nominated Merrick Garland to take Scalia's seat, but the Republican Senate has refused to consider Garland's nomination, in an effort to prevent a liberal court majority.
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CHINA
Tensions have been rising over China's assertive behavior in the seas of Asia. The U. S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets.
Donald Trump says that the sheer volume of trade gives the U. S. leverage over China. He accuses China of undervaluing its currency to make its exports artificially cheap and proposes tariffs as high as 45 percent on Chinese imports if Beijing doesn't change its behavior. Such action could risk a trade war that would make many products in the U. S. more expensive.
Clinton says the U. S. needs to press the rising Asian power to play by international rules, whether on trade or territorial disputes.
While many of China's neighbors are unnerved by its military build-up, the wider world needs the U. S. and China to get along, to tackle global problems. The U. S. and China are also economically inter-dependent, and punishment by one party could end up hurting the other.
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INCOME INEQUALITY
Income inequality has surged near levels last seen before the Great Depression. The average income for the top 1 percent of households climbed 7.7 percent last year to $1.36 million, according to tax data. That privileged sliver of the population saw pay climb at almost twice the rate of income growth for the other 99 percent, whose pay averaged a humble $48,768.
Dogged on the issue during the primaries by Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton has highlighted inequality in multiple speeches. She hopes to redirect more money to the middle class and impoverished. Clinton would raise taxes on the wealthy, increase the federal minimum wage, boost infrastructure spending, provide universal pre-K and offer the prospect of tuition-free college.
Donald Trump offers a blunter message about a system "rigged" against average Americans. To bring back jobs, Trump has promised new trade deals with better terms, greater infrastructure spending than Clinton foresees and tax cuts that he says would propel stronger growth (though independent analysts say his budget plans would raise deficits).
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OPIOID EPIDEMIC
More than 28,000 Americans died from overdosing on opioids in 2014, a record high for the nation.
That's 78 people per day, a number that doesn't include the millions of family members, first responders and even taxpayers who feel the ripple of drug addiction in their daily lives.
A rise in prescription painkillers is partially to blame: The sale of these drugs has quadrupled since 1999, and so has the number of Americans dying from an addiction to them. When prescriptions run out, people find themselves turning to the cheaper alternative heroin and, increasingly, the even more deadly drug fentanyl.
Recovering addicts and their family members are increasingly speaking out, putting a face on drug addiction and lessening the stigma surrounding it. But dollars for prevention, treatment and recovery services are still hard to come by, leaving many people waiting weeks or months to find the treatment they're seeking. Meantime, family members empty bank accounts in search of help, while law enforcement officers and emergency rooms serve as a first line of defense.
Donald Trump says the wall he wants to build along the southern border is essential to stopping the flow of illegal drugs into the country. Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, pledges to spend $10 billion to increase access to prevention, treatment and recovery services, among other things.
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NORTH KOREA
Pariah state North Korea could soon be capable of targeting America with nuclear weapons. What can the U. S. do to stop it?
Diplomacy and economic sanctions have not worked so far. North Korea's isolation is deepening, but it has continued to conduct nuclear test explosions and make advances in its missile technology.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump says the U. S. can put more pressure on China to rein in its North Korean ally. He says he is willing to meet the North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un.
Democrat Hillary Clinton wants the world to intensify sanctions as the Obama administration did with Iran, a course that eventually opened the way for a deal to contain its nuclear program.
But it will be tough to force North Korea back to negotiations that aim at its disarmament in exchange for aid. Kim views atomic weapons as a security guarantee for his oppressive regime
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HEALTH CARE
About 9 in 10 Americans now have health insurance, more than at any time in history. But progress is incomplete, and the future far from certain. Rising costs could bedevil the next occupant of the White House.
Millions of people previously shut out have been covered by President Barack Obama's health care law. No one can be denied coverage anymore because of a pre-existing condition. But "Obamacare" remains divisive, and premiums for next year are rising sharply in many communities.
Whether Americans would be better off trading for a GOP plan is another question. A recent study found that Donald Trump's proposal would make 18 million people uninsured. GOP congressional leaders have a more comprehensive approach, but key details are still missing.
Overall health care spending is trending higher again, and prices for prescription drugs — new and old — are a major worry.
Medicare's insolvency date has moved up by two years — to 2028.
Hillary Clinton would stay the course, adjusting as needed. Republicans are united on repealing Obama's law, but it's unclear how they would replace it.
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AMERICA AND THE WORLD
How the U. S. uses its influence as the world's sole superpower is a central feature of presidential power.
It can mean taking the country to war — to protect the homeland or to defend an ally. Or it can mean using diplomacy to prevent war. It can affect U. S. jobs, too, as choices arise either to expand trade deals or to erect barriers to protect U. S. markets.
In the contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, America's role in the world is a point of sharp differences. Each says the U. S. must be the predominant power, but they would exercise leadership differently. Trump calls his approach "America first," meaning alliances and coalitions would not pass muster unless they produced a net benefit to the U. S. Clinton sees international partnerships as essential tools for using U. S. influence and lessening the chances of war.
These divergent views could mean very different approaches to the military fight and ideological struggle against the Islamic State, the future of Afghanistan and Iraq, the contest with China for influence in Asia and the Pacific, and growing nervousness in Europe over Russian aggression.
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VOTING RIGHTS
Voting rights in America are in flux. Republican-controlled legislatures are tightening voter laws, placing limits on early voting and same-day registration, and imposing new requirements for IDs at polling places. In 2013, the Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. That provision had required states with a history of racial discrimination to get federal preclearance to change election laws.
The issue has become highly partisan with the rapid growth of minority populations, which in recent presidential elections have tilted heavily Democratic.
The Obama Justice Department has challenged voter ID and other laws, saying they could restrict access for minorities and young people. Recent lower court rulings temporarily softened some of the toughest restrictions, but litigation remains knotted up with Supreme Court appeals likely. Bills in Congress to restore the Voting Rights Act are stalled.
Donald Trump opposes same-day voter registration, backing laws to ensure only citizens vote. Hillary Clinton wants Congress to restore the Voting Rights Act and seeks a national standard of at least 20 days of early in-person voting.
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Associated Press writers contributing to this report: Marcy Gordon, Jesse J. Holland, Lolita C. Baldor, Matthew Lee, Lisa Marie Pane, Stephen Ohlemacher, Erica Werner, David A. Lieb, Bradley Klapper, Anne Flaherty, Jennifer C. Kerr, Alicia A. Caldwell, Seth Borenstein, Josh Lederman, Andrew Taylor, Kathleen Ronayne, Paul Wiseman, Mark Sherman, Josh Boak, Matthew Pennington, Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Robert Burns and Hope Yen.
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This story is part of AP's "Why It Matters" series, which will examine three dozen issues at stake in the presidential election between now and Election Day. You can find them at: http://apne.ws/2bBG85a
EDITOR'S NOTE - A look at issues at stake in the election and their impact on people

 

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The best Australian homes only Chinese millionaires can afford to buy

It's Golden Week in China, a weeklong holiday where 600 million people flee overcrowded cities on vacation, including six million headed overseas. Some of the wealthiest flock to Australia by the planeload to check out some of the country's most sought-after properties to buy as investments or holiday homes. In Sydney they typically have harbour views, good access to top private schools, and a price tag well into the millions - with reserves rarely listed in marketing. Scroll down for video   It's not just a fun week of sightseeing and house-hunting for the Chinese, its a bonanza for luxury real estate agents who roll out the red carpet for the high rollers. Real estate promoter Arron Liu said the 'property tourism' packages he organisaes in Australia for prospective Chinese buyers are increasingly popular. 'I usually take them to Melbourne or Sydney. Sightseeing is secondary, their main purpose is to view properties,' he told Domain. Sotheby's Realty is a company that has made an artform out of cashing in on rich Chinese buyers by not only showing them the best buys, but making them feel at home. Cashed-up clients are chaffered between Sydney houses in a $1 million Rolls Royce Phantom and wined and dined at Century Restaurant, with the company even planning to add a helicopter tour next year. 'We take them in a very nice car, take them to nice restaurants, really give them the VIP experience which they love,' managing director Michael Pallier told A Current Affair. Houses are opened specifically for Golden Week and usually twice a week so more prospective buyers can look, and fly back for the auction if they want to buy. His wife Lu Lu, a principal at the firm, is also in on the act, using her fluentcy in Mandarin, Shanghainese and Cantonese to entice investors to buy. 'They are not necessarily buying for a capital gain but because of the lifestyle offered here and the security that property in Australia brings, she said.  'People have money and want to buy something special. 'I show them around, take them to restaurants, show them houses depending on their requirements. As a new Australian I'm happy to host them. 'It's fun but I think I'm going to put lots of weight on!' Ms Pallier showed a wealthy investor around a luxury three-bedroom waterfront apartment in Neutral Bay with glorious views of Sydney Harbour. The apartment features long terrace overlooking the harbour, a boat shed, wine cellar, a tennis court literally on the water and even a private jetty. The prospective buyer, Michael, splits his time between Shanghai and Sydney and already has another harbourside property - but was looking to add another. 'It's my dream apartment,' he said. 'Michael is a typical VIP repeat client that we deal with. He's a very nice man and when he sees something he likes he goes for it,' Mr Pallier said. Mr Pallier explained older investors like Michael looked for smaller holiday apartments while younger ones want big homes for their entire family. Another wealthy investor James Man, who works in finance and investment, was after exactly that kind of property. 'I would like a house in Double Bay or Vaucluse, close to good schools and for around $10 million to $20 million,' he said. Monika Tu, from luxury concierge and property agent Black Diamondz, was also hosting 35 groups jetting in from China over Golden week to view properties. They were asking for 'country retreats', homes with a private jetty, penthouses and homes near schools at price of $5 million to $8 million. One of Ms Tu's clients had a $25 million budget,' she told the Australian Financial Review. The Keepers Cottage, Valcluse This heritage-listed landmark 2,600 square metres estate built in 1881 sold for $7.5 million on Thursday to Chinese conglomerate Nanshan Group. It includes sweeping level lawns, working stables, office, soaring ceilings, polished floors, Jacuzzi, cool room, aviary, CCTV and is of course close to schools. It even has its own lighthouse. 6/25 Wolseley Road, Point Piper   A luxury three-bedroom apartment like the one Michael viewed, has spectacular views of both Sydney Harbour and the the city skyline. It can all be enjoyed from a balcony coming off a newly-painted living area and brand new kitchen. 24 Strickland Street, Rose Bay   A family-friendly five-bedroom, five-bathroom house with both spectacular harbour views and easy access to the eastern suburbs beaches - all for $4.6 million. It features a sunken lounge with bi-fold doors opening to a private entertainment courtyard, polished timber flooring , extensive storage and double lock-up garage. The to-die-for views are likely to distract from whatever is on the TV in the main living area and it has multiple giant entertaining areas and lush lawns. 13A 13B & 13C/13 Thornton Street, Darling Point This property is three apartments merged together into one almost 500 square metre penthouse to capture nearly 360-degree views. Located in Australia's most expensive suburb, it is unlikely to come cheap and affordable by only the most deep-pocketed investor. The four-bedrooms property includes a family/billiards room plus a good sized study/fifth bedroom and three bathrooms. It also has a club bar, a 700-bottle wine cellar plus grand foyer and secure parking for three cars. 18 Fisher Avenue, Vaucluse   Billed as a 'grand luxury residence', this huge, ornate property has five bedrooms, four bathrooms, one with a with marble spa, and a grand reception hall, with marble floors. There is also a gas-heated pool, shaded barbeque area and terracing, plus a marble fireplace, wine cellar, and elegant old-style interior decorating.

 

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The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam by Christopher Goscha – review

I n 40 years, the relationship between the United States and Vietnam has swung about as widely as is possible between two countries. In 1975, the US cut diplomatic ties with Hanoi after the end of the Vietnam war (AKA the second Indochina war), which left more than a million Vietnamese and more than 58,000 Americans dead. US officials and allied South Vietnamese famously fled Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) in the biggest helicopter airlift in American history. Now, though the country remains a highly repressive, nominally communist state, it has become one of Washington’s dearest friends in Asia.
The US navy pays regular port calls in Vietnam. President Obama lifted the ban on sales of lethal arms to Hanoi, which had been in place since the end of the war. The two nations have roughly $45bn (£35bn) in annual bilateral trade. When the head of Vietnam’s Communist party visited Washington last year, he made the rounds of official meetings, think-tank talks and private briefings like a conquering hero.
Such a swing in relations might seem unusual. Since the Vietnam war introduced Americans to the country, journalists, historians and many foreign leaders have viewed it through a narrow prism: Vietnam is a country repeatedly invaded by foreign powers, from imperial China to colonial France to the US; it is a country with a tenacious people, whose identity has been forged by fighting invaders. Vietnam’s foremost heroes, such as the 18th-century emperor Quang Trung, and Ho Chi Minh, are those whose wars forced foreign powers out.
But as Christopher Goscha shows in his groundbreaking book, Vietnam has always been a far more complicated place – politically, strategically, economically and culturally - than this image of a country of stubborn, united fighters. He manages the (not easy) task of showing Vietnam’s complexity without losing the reader with too much detail. Goscha understands that Vietnam is a land long coveted by major powers – it is a narrow spit of coast with fertile deltas, astride one of the most important trade routes in the world. But it has also been a major regional power itself. At times, it has fought back against foreign powers, but at other times it has sought diplomatic alliances, or welcomed migrants into what is a very ethnically and religiously diverse country.
Vietnam has enjoyed periods of unity, but even the Vietnamese Communist party was more divided than most outsiders realised. And today, Vietnam’s unity has serious fractures.
Goscha has provided quite simply the finest, most readable single-volume history of Vietnam in English. He takes on some persistent myths about the country. First, that Vietnam has been constantly preyed on. In the pre-colonial period, southeast Asia’s own empires constantly colonised each other. A series of Vietnamese empires conquered parts of modern-day Laos and Cambodia between the 15th and 19th centuries, while alternately fighting and placating China’s rulers, who saw Vietnam as a vassal state.
Second, Goscha shows that Vietnamese dynasties were actively modernising the country before French colonisation began in the mid to late 19th century. The Nguyen dynasty was establishing new tax and irrigation systems, new schools and a modern bureaucracy when France declared its rule over Indochina.
Under the Nguyens, the French and the two governments of South and North Vietnam, the country was hardly monoethnic, though the pictures most Americans saw of Vietnam were of ethnically Viet people. Vietnam, as Goscha argues, has long been influenced not only by the majority ethnic Viet and by Chinese Confucian culture, which spread south over centuries, but also by a far broader range of cultures and peoples.
During the French and American eras, Paris and Washington made much of the need to protect oppressed religious minorities – primarily, Catholic Vietnamese – as a reason for military involvement in Indochina. (This was not the primary driver of US policy, which was based on strategic calculations, but it was an effective rhetorical device.) The flight of up to one million North Vietnamese, many of them Catholics, to the south after the country was divided in 1954, fleeing in boats provided in part by the US navy, captured the imagination of Americans and Europeans. The evacuation made US folk heroes of such people as Tom Dooley, a handsome, Kennedyesque American Catholic priest who helped with the refugee exodus and then wrote a bestseller about it.
Some western liberals, in turn, saw Catholics and other religious minorities as somehow unrepresentative of Vietnam – an idea punctured by the fact that Ngo Dinh Diem, the brutal South Vietnamese leader, was a Catholic. But Goscha adds complexity here as well. He shows that Catholics, reformist Buddhists and many powerful local religions enjoyed vast public support, and were just as often modernising forces as retrograde ones. And French and American policies were not always simply pro-Catholic. During the colonial era, France was a republican and often harshly anti-clerical state, and Paris inherently distrusted French Catholic priests in Vietnam, who taught in local languages and often subtly undermined colonial rule.
Goscha also adds to the growing pile of evidence showing that virtually all of the policy mistakes made by the US during the Vietnam war had been made, in almost all the same ways, by France in its Indochina war between 1946 and 1954. Of course, the US military dramatically stepped up the asymmetrical warfare when joined in the Vietnam war, as Goscha notes. Its bombing campaigns were of a very different scale. Yet US policy-makers insisted then – and some still insist – that they acted differently, that America was not a colonial power in Vietnam and the US could succeed, they thought, by working with local nationalist leaders. It had done so in the Philippines, backing second-world-war hero Ramon Magsaysay and helping him defeat a communist insurgency in the 1950s. But Magsaysay had strong popular support, and the situation in the Philippines was not replicable in Vietnam.
Between 1975, when the country was reunified at the end of the war, and the early 90s, Vietnam’s already battered society struggled through more upheavals, ones little understood outside the country. The Vietnamese military invaded Cambodia and removed its former ally the Khmer Rouge in 1979. Hanoi fought a border war with China in the same year. Then the country struggled through decades of grinding poverty. The Vietnam war left the country having to rebuild its entire infrastructure, and the legacy of the war lingered for 15 years, as the US imposed sanctions on Hanoi.
The country embarked on economic reforms in the late 80s and early 90s, at the same time as the end of the cold war allowed the US, and Vietnam’s south-east Asian neighbours, to restore diplomatic and economic ties to the country. These reforms fostered two decades of growth, and transformed Ho Chi Minh City into a burgeoning Asian megacity.
But reforms that have opened up parts of the economy have also left staggering amounts of corruption and debt in state enterprises. Economic change has not been accompanied by political change. Young Vietnamese have become used to free social lives and a degree of freedom online; they organise protests against environmental destruction and the double-dealing of officials, and they are no longer willing to accept Hanoi’s rule unquestioningly.
Yet the Communist party’s leadership remains opaque, and the divisions – between supposed reformers and supporters of harsh, one-party rule – are hard to discern.
Vietnam’s economy is moving ahead but the next step forward for Vietnamese politics remains hard to imagine.
Joshua Kurlantzick’s A Great Place to Have a War: America in Laos and the Birth of a Military CIA will be published by Simon & Schuster
•   The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam  is published by Allen Lane. To order a copy for £24.60 (RRP £30) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99.

 

 84 /100 

Police Department Offers Advice On ‘Creepy Clown’ Encounters

(CBS) – It’s not necessarily illegal to be a part of the national “creepy clown” trend, but one Illinois police department is giving pranksters fair warning: Spooked people may respond in self-defense.
“These incidents have people on high alert, and those deciding to dress as clowns are warned to take great care and consideration in doing so, as it is possible that those they target may respond quickly and with force if they feel they must defend themselves.”
So says the Antioch Police Department in the far north suburbs. It released a community advisory about the spate of incidents that have freaked people out. Across the nation, people have reported sinister-looking clowns, though some incidents have turned out to be hoaxes.
Antioch has likewise received several reports of people dressed as clowns, mostly “engaged in benign behaviors, such as standing or walking through a parking lot or down the street,” police officials say.
In another case, officers responded to a report of someone in a car wearing a clown mask while holding a baseball bat outside the window.
What to do? Police officials offer these safety tips:
-Parents should teach children to stay away from strangers dressed as clowns.
-Dressing up as a clown isn’t illegal, but observers should call 9-1-1 if a disguised person is “behaving suspiciously” or harassing them.
-Don’t confront someone dressed as a clown.
-Note the clown’s outfit and any vehicle involved in the encounter.
Lastly, Antioch police emphasize that people considering dressing up as a clown should realize “they may be putting their own safety at risk” if someone takes the prank the wrong way.

 

 85 /100 

Panasonic announces a new stretchable battery

Panasonic has denounced a new stretchable battery that is being showcased during Ceatec, a record muster in Japan.
According to a company, a battery can be focussed and disfigured adult to a radius of 25mm, with a limit angle of 25 degrees, over 1,000 times, while still maintaining 99 percent of the charge.
The battery can potentially be used inside wearable’s or stretchable screens.
BBC Click’s Dan Simmons explains what this new square of tech is done of and how it works.
BBC Click will have some-more from Ceatec on this weekend’s radio show. Find out some-more during BBC.com/Click and @BBCClick .

 

 86 /100 

Don’t call me a British artist – I’m thoroughly European

A rt does not take place in a vacuum. It maintains an ineradicable, if often troubled, relation to power. Renaissance painters understood this, and allegorised it in their canvases, which often recast in a mythical light the systems of patronage that had occasioned them in the first place. So did 20th-century dramatists. Both Yeats and Brian Friel wrote plays featuring court scribes tasked not only with recording political events but also, more subtly, with generating the narratives and symbolism that consolidate the authority of the monarchs they work for.
In our society, the artist may have no executive power whatsoever, but their ace-card lies in the fact that they command a means – perhaps the primal one – of putting value in the world: a means of making meaning. They can use this status to subvert, or to shore up, power – sometimes both at the same time – and they can do this well, badly or indifferently; but one thing they can never do is be politically neutral.
A few weeks ago I received an invitation to a special reception to be held at the Royal Academy for “British artists” to celebrate “British creativity”. In normal times such a gesture might have seemed a little jingoistic, but essentially innocuous. But these are not normal times. Given the extraordinary far-right takeover the country seems to be undergoing, current talk of “British” X or Y or Z (“values” or “decency” or “culture”) usually marks one end of a chain, at the other end of which someone is being shunned in a playground, spat at in a supermarket, or worse. The invitation mentioned designers and businesses who “shape our culture”, and outlined the security procedures that would surround the event. It wasn’t hard to read between the lines: while Martin Roth at the V&A had made it clear his institution would have no truck with such nonsense, the RA was helping to assemble a roll-call of figures from the arts to pose arm-in-arm with ministers, royalty and innovators of the James Dyson variety, for a soft-power, post-Brexit rebrand of “British” culture.
Setting aside the fact that, since Dyson threw his lot in with Nigel Farage , I don’t even dry my hands in public toilets, the whole premise seems to me conceptually wrong. It’s wrong for the same reason the Blair government’s co-option of Britpop and Cool Britannia was wrong (although no one was being beaten up on the underbelly of the cognitive error back then).
The fact is, I’m not an example of “British creativity”. Like all English-language writers, I’m thoroughly European. To read Shakespeare is to read a rich remix of Ovid, Petrarch and Lucretius; to read Joyce (a British passport-holder) is to read Mallarmé, Laforgue, Goethe. The wellspring of our shared archive is Greek – and since the Hellenic world was in fact spread all around the Mediterranean basin, this means that to be European is already to be African and Asian.
Millennia of trade and empire, of diaspora and endlessly crisscrossing migration, have produced a culture that is and always will be cross-pollinated. If London and other British cities have become cultural hubs, this is because they stand at intersections within larger, international flows and networks. To credit an intersection with creating (“innovating”) the currents from which it merely feeds, though, is like calling a lightbulb a generator.
About the same time, I received another invitation, this time to read from my work at an anti-Brexit art festival in Hackney’s gallery-filled Vyner Street. Beneath bunting designed by Fiona Banner, Bob and Roberta Smith and Jessica Voorsanger played a gig, Katrin Plavcak and Ulrika Segerberg did an electronic sewing machine-enhanced performance, Lucy Reynolds conducted a “choir” who chanted in 20 languages at once, and a large crowd who could trace their heritage to every corner of the Earth ate, drank and generally had fun celebrating internationalism and renouncing tribalist bigotry, while children darted round their legs.
It’s quite possible that several of the Vyner Street participants, being high-profile culture-shaping innovators, were invited to the RA too. I doubt they’ll go, though, any more than I will.
It’s struck me more and more of late that the capacity to operate well as an artist comes with a requirement to think through the contexts within which you’re operating. Yeats’s and Friel’s court scribes understood this, and so did the many bands who thought twice about performing in apartheid-era South Africa. Right now, in a country where people are being killed in the street for not sounding or looking “British” enough, artists should be very careful whose summons they accept.
• The fee for this article will be donated to City of Sanctuary

 

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'The Girl on the Train' is story of female empowerment, says star Emily Blunt

It's a thriller, a whodunit, a story of loneliness, alcoholism, and voyeurism. But "The Girl on the Train," the movie version of the best-selling novel, is also a tale of female empowerment, the filmmakers say.
After selling 15 million copies worldwide since its 2015 release, Paula Hawkins' story of murder, betrayal, and emotional abuse gets a dark twist in the movie that is now in theaters.
Emily Blunt plays Rachel Watson, an alcoholic who has lost her job and her marriage and who spies from the train on her cheating ex-husband (Justin Theroux) and his new wife, Anna (Rebecca Ferguson). Rachel turns amateur detective when another woman with disturbing secrets, Megan (Haley Bennett), goes missing and turns up dead.
"I feel like this film represents women's right to be bad and flawed and wrong and messed up. I think women around the world are going to applaud that," Blunt said.
"Yes, (the women) are pitted against each other in the beginning but yet they do ultimately unite, and they are real," she added.
All three women are subject to jealousy, controlling behavior, and gaslighting – the term for psychological abuse that makes a victim doubt his or her sanity.
Some previews have had women in the audience cheering at the end as the female characters wreak their revenge.
The movie opens during domestic violence awareness month in the United States and the National Network to End Domestic Violence has produced discussion questions that highlight themes of abuse in the book.
Director Tate Taylor said he would be glad if the film empowers women. "I didn't intend, on an intellectual level, for it to be a revenge film, but it has struck a nerve. "
Taylor, who also directed the female-centric movie "The Help," attributes his empathy with women to his upbringing.
"I was raised by a single mom. She was pretty much my primary caregiver... So I had a lot of female energy and I saw a lot of struggle, a lot of determination and a lot of success. I equate women with being survivors because of my mom," he said.
Taylor and Blunt said the movie was deliberately darker than the book.
"We agreed that we were really going to reveal the underbelly of domestic life in all its darkness," said Blunt. "It's incredibly brutal to watch at times and unsettling, and I am thrilled that even for lovers of the book, it still shocks. "

 

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Krysten Ritter rocks a dark ensemble even Jessica Jones would envy as she jets out of LA

From Breaking Bad to Jessica Jones, Krysten Ritter has never shied away from taking on a show with an edgy streak. And on Friday, the 34-year-old seemed to embrace her inner tough girl as she jetted out of Los Angeles. The actress rocked black ripped jeans and combat boots as she jetted out of LA. Dressed comfortably in a black knit sweater, Krysten seemed to be in top spirits as she smiled while strolling through the transport hub. The Don't Trust The B In Apartment 23 actress wore her raven black locks down in loose curls and looked to have some makeup on as to flatter her stunning features. Krysten's glossy lips may have been touched up with just chap stick, as the star carried a stick of the makeup in hand. And, topping off the overall effortlessly stylish look, Krysten wore a pair of black sunglasses. Wheeling her belongings through the airport, the actress looked refreshed and relaxed as she looked forward to more work ahead. Krysten currenly stars as super heroine Jessica Jones on the Netflix series of the same name. The popular show will return for a second season, but not until at least 2018. Next up, Krysten is set to star in the upcoming show  The Defenders, which will feature characters Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Daredevil (Charlie Cox), and Iron Fist (Finn Jones). Netflix has yet to release the standalone series for Iron Fist, which is set for 2017, to be followed likely by The Defenders.

 

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Pacific walrus begin arriving ashore on Alaska's northwest coast

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Pacific walrus are beginning to come ashore near a remote community on Alaska’s northwest coast in what’s become a marine mammal phenomenon caused by a warming climate.
The massive animals have gathered by the thousands each fall on a barrier island near the Inupiat Eskimo village of Point Lay. Last year, 35,000 hauled out on the rocky beach. So far, about 1,000 walrus are currently at the site, CBS affiliate KTVA reports.
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokeswoman Andrea Medeiros says about 1,000 walrus are currently at the site. Medeiros says the village notified her agency Friday that the animals have begun arriving.
In this aerial photo taken on Sept. 27, 2014, and provided by NOAA, some 35,000 walrus gather on shore near Point Lay, Alaska. Pacific walrus looking for places to rest in the absence of sea ice are coming to shore in record numbers on Alaska's northwest coast. The enormous gathering was spotted during NOAA's annual arctic marine mammal aerial survey.
Walrus prefer resting on sea ice to look out for predators such as polar bears. But in 2007, they began coming ashore on the northwest Alaska coast because of receding summer sea ice as Arctic temperatures have warmed.
The World Wildlife Fund put out an alarming report saying the planet's animal population has been cut in half in the past 40 years -- partially f...
Tribal leaders in a remote northwest Alaska village are asking that people leave Pacific walrus alone as the animals start to come ashore, CBS affiliate KTVA reports . 
The tribal council of Point Lay says in a statement they are concerned about the walrus because they are subject to stampedes that can kill the youngest of the animals.
The council says walrus are a source of subsistence food for them. The council says villagers want to protect their cultural way of life and asked that anyone in the area respect “our animals and try not to disturb them.”
Four men from Point Hope face federal charges for killing walruses  outside of subsistence hunting regulations. Those charges include allegations the men threatened the group by causing the walruses to stampede and potentially kill each other at Cape Lisburne — located between Point Lay and Point Hope in western Alaska. Each man faces up to a year in prison for each offense, along with a maximum fine of $20,000.

 

 90 /100 

U-D Jesuit's Scott Nelson, De La Salle's Allen Stritzinger show talent

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Scott Nelson and Allen Stritzinger are both going to make a lot of postseason All-State teams.
Friday night facing each other, they showed why in U-D Jesuit’s 49-35 victory over Warren De La Salle at Hazel Park High school.
Both rarely leave the field, but it was Nelson who got the upper hand on this night for the Cubs, scoring the final two touchdowns on runs of 16 and 41 yards to break open a 35-35 tie.
A receiver and defensive back by trade, Nelson is playing out of position at quarterback because of an injury to Michael Sims in the season opener.
Nelson accounted for 151 yards in the air and another 108 on the ground, as the Cubs advanced to the playoffs with a 5-1 record.
On a crucial fourth-down, Nelson deflected a pass intended for Stritzinger to turn the ball over to the Cubs.
“Allen’s a great player,’’ said Nelson. “It was a great battle with him. We had to dig down deep and make a play. We were able to do that.’’
After a slow start Stritzinger, bound for Syracuse, was dynamic in the backfield, as a receiver and as a defensive back.
His 35-yard catch set up a Cordell Tannyhill touchdown. Stritzinger caught a 16-yard TD and ran in the two-point conversion. He scored on a four-yard TD run to give the Pilots their last lead of the game, 35-28.
Both Stritzinger and Nelson are already champions.
Stritzinger won his as a sophomore at Ford Field. Nelson won his at the Breslin Center on the Cubs’ basketball Class A championship team.
“Allen’s a great player,’’ said De La Salle coach Mike Giannone. “He works his butt off. He was out there giving it his all.’’
Nelson said he has trimmed his list down to Penn State, Michigan State, Iowa, Wisconsin and Northwestern.
“I can’t say enough about Scott,’’ said U-D Jesuit coach Oscar Olejniczak. “He was all over the place, running and passing the ball.’’
DETROIT FREE PRESS
Novi senior Robby Heil adds to 'Rudy' moment, wins homecoming king
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 91 /100 

Trump faces female voter problems in Oakland County

Republican state Rep. Kathy Crawford attended Donald Trump’s rally last week in her hometown of Novi and came away thinking he sounded presidential in front of more than an estimated 7,000 people.
Then, over the weekend, Crawford turned on the television. She saw Trump deliver a speech in Pennsylvania, where he mocked what Democratic rival Hillary Clinton looked like when she fainted outside a Sept. 11 memorial event in New York during a bout of pneumonia.
“Horrible,” Crawford said. “I just saw snippets of it and thought, ‘Oh boy, here we go again.’ ”
DETROIT NEWS
Trump apologizes, yet still defiant after crude remarks
In Crawford’s social circles in Oakland County, she said Republican women have some advice for their party’s White House nominee: “Everybody wishes he would just shut up sometimes.”
Oakland County, once the crown jewel of Michigan Republican politics, has become a reliably blue county in presidential elections, with Democrats winning the last five contests.
Even Mitt Romney, a native son of Oakland County, struck out in the sprawling Detroit suburbs in 2012, losing decisively to President Barack Obama by 8.5 percentage points or more than 52,000 votes.
The GOP’s continued electoral challenge in Oakland County was reflected in last week’s Detroit News/WDIV statewide poll on the presidential race, which found Clinton leading Trump by 20 percentage points in the county.
By contrast, Trump had a 20-point lead over Clinton in Macomb County, where the businessman has built a base of blue-collar support centered around his opposition to free-trade deals.
The poll of 600 likely Michigan voters had a plus-minus margin of error of 4 percentage points, but the margin grows in the county results because the sample size is smaller.
Pollster Richard Czuba said Trump’s biggest weakness is married white women, including those who lean toward the GOP. Among all women statewide, Trump trailed Clinton by 21 percentage points, 48 percent to 27 percent.
“But we’ve never seen it quite this bad,” said Czuba, president of the Lansing-based Glengariff Group Inc. “You can’t be competitive in Michigan if you’re taking 27 percent of female voters. So he really has to pivot... in counties like Oakland.”
Clinton’s lead over Trump among all white women was seven percentage points, Czuba said.
“He’s got to do better here if he wants to mitigate how badly he’s doing among non-white women,” Czuba said.
The News-WDIV poll found 66 percent of all women have an unfavorable view of Trump, while Clinton is unpopular among 42 percent of female voters surveyed.
“I hear my Republican colleagues say how disappointed they are in the references he makes to women,” said Nancy Quarles, a Democratic Oakland County commissioner from Southfield. “My Republican associates and friends I have, they can’t wrap their arms around anything that he really stands for.”
Romney and Republican U. S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona faced double-digit gender gaps to Obama in 2012 and 2008, respectively, Czuba said.
The Democratic winning streak in presidential elections in Oakland County, coupled with Trump’s unpredictable campaign antics, has some local Republicans nervous about the New York businessman’s wreaking electoral havoc down the ballot if he loses the county by a wider margin than Romney did.
“I don’t know which way it’s going to go, but there’s a lot of worry on us down-ticket candidates that it could have a severe impact on us,” said Eileen Kowall, a Republican Oakland County commissioner from White Lake seeking re-election. “That’s what we’re trying counteract that with our ground games.”
Kowall said she’s supporting Trump, but wishes the GOP nominee would deliver a more “positive message … with facts.”
“I would like to see Trump stick to a message and quit going off course,” she said.
On Friday, Trump was on the defensive again after the Washington Post published a 2005 recording in which he made lewd comments about women. In the conversation, Trump bragged that “I don’t even wait” before moving in to kiss and fondle them: “When you’re a star they let you do anything.”
In a statement, Trump apologized “if anyone was offended” by the conversation but added: “Bill Clinton has said far worse to me on the golf course.”
The second presidential debate Sunday night in St. Louis could prove to be a pivotal moment for Trump to change the minds of undecided female voters in Oakland County and suburban areas in other battleground states, Czuba said.
Ronna Romney McDaniel, chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party, said Trump could improve his standing with women voters if he talks about his plan to ease the financial burden of child care.
Trump has proposed allowing parents to deduct the average cost of child care in their state from taxable income up to $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for married coupled filing jointly. A family earning $70,000 annually with $7,000 in child care expenses would get a $840 break on their federal taxes, according to the Trump campaign.
“I hope in the second debate he highlights some of those policies more, that he focuses on specific proposals that he’s put go forward to help working families, working women,” McDaniel said. “I think if he does that, the voters will change their mind on him.”
Other Republican women said Trump should continue emphasizing his independence from the political establishment.
“He may be crude in some respects with his words and his behavior, but he does see that we have a problem,” said Celeste Cole of West Bloomfield. “He has the guts. He’s not beholden to somebody.”
Other Republican women want to see Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, come to Oakland County before Election Day to reach out to women voters, particularly working mothers.
“She’s a brilliant young woman who does a great job representing her father,” said Theresa Mungioli, chairwoman of the Oakland County Republican Party.
The Trump campaign has announced no plans for Ivanka Trump to travel to Michigan. But Karen Pence, wife of Trump’s running mate, is slated to attend a fundraiser on Oct. 17 in Bloomfield Hills.
Scott Hagerstrom, state director of Trump’s Michigan campaign, conceded in an interview last week that Trump has a problem with female voters.
“I think we’re working on that,” Hagerstrom said Friday on WKAR-TV’s “Off The Record.” “I think all of the polls show Hillary Clinton is winning with women, but the fact is we’re taking the message, when we go on the issues, Mr. Trump wins easily.”
Hagerstrom was interviewed on the public television show a few hours after Trump lashed out at 5 a.m. that morning in a series of Twitter comments lambasting a woman who won his Miss Universe beauty pageant in 1996.
Trump encouraged voters to check out Alicia Machado’s “sex tape” and called her a “con.” There was no explicit footage from a 2005 episode of a Spanish reality-television show in which the model supposedly had sex with a fellow participant.
The tweet-storm came four days after Clinton accused Trump during the first debate of calling Machado “Miss Piggy” 20 years ago after she gained weight following her win as Miss Universe.
“Mr. Trump does not stand back to be attacked,” Hagerstrom said. “He has a history of defending himself when he’s attacked. ... He was tweeting to put the issue to rest.”
“Telling people to check out a sex tape this morning ... is putting it to rest?” asked Zoe Clark, program director of Michigan Radio.
“He’s challenging the credibility of an individual that Hillary Clinton brought up in a personal attack,” Hagerstrom said. “He’s sort of darned if he does, darned if he doesn’t.”
Siham Jweda Lecureaux, a 62-year-old naturalized Chaldean-American from Farmington Hills supporting Trump, said Clinton has created a controversy over the former Miss Universe to distract voters from her record as secretary of state.
“It’s not against women or offending women at all,” said Jweda Lecureaux, a former hair stylist. “Hillary Clinton took it out of context and blew it out of proportion.”
clivengood@detroitnews.com
Staff Writer Candice Williams contributed.

 

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The ‘quiet catastrophe’ of unemployment

It is this: After 88 consecutive months of the economic expansion that began in June 2009, a smaller percentage of American males in the prime working years (ages 25 to 54) are working than were working near the end of the Great Depression in 1940, when the unemployment rate was above 14 percent.
The work rate for adult men has plunged 13 percentage points in a half-century. This “work deficit” of “Great Depression-scale underutilization” of male potential workers is the subject of Nicholas Eberstadt’s new monograph “ Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis ,” which explores the economic and moral causes and consequences of this:
Since 1948, the proportion of men 20 and older without paid work has more than doubled, to almost 32 percent. This “eerie and radical transformation” — men creating an “alternative lifestyle to the age-old male quest for a paying job” — is largely voluntary. Men who have chosen to not seek work are two and a half times more numerous than men that government statistics count as unemployed because they are seeking jobs.
What Eberstadt calls a “normative sea change” has made it a “viable option” for “sturdy men,” who are neither working nor looking for work, to choose “to sit on the economic sidelines, living off the toil or bounty of others.” Only about 15 percent of men 25 to 54 who worked not at all in 2014 said they were unemployed because they could not find work.
For 50 years, the number of men in that age cohort, who are neither working nor looking for work, has grown nearly four times faster than the number who are working or seeking work. And the pace of this has been “almost totally uninfluenced by the business cycle.” The “economically inactive” have eclipsed the unemployed, as government statistics measure them, as “the main category of men without jobs.” Those statistics were created before government policy and social attitudes made it possible to be economically inactive.
Eberstadt does not say that government assistance causes this, but obviously it finances it. To some extent, however, this is a distinction without a difference. In a 2012 monograph, Eberstadt noted that in 1960 there were 134 workers for every one officially certified as disabled; by 2010 there were just over 16. Between January 2010 and December 2011, while the economy produced 1.73 million nonfarm jobs, almost half as many workers became disability recipients. Even though work is less stressful and the workplace is safer than ever.
Largely because of government benefits and support by other family members, nonworking men 25 to 54 have household expenditures a third higher than the average of those in the bottom income quintile. Hence, Eberstadt says, they “appear to be better off than tens of millions of other Americans today, including the millions of single mothers who are either working or seeking work.”
In 1965, even high school dropouts were more likely to be in the workforce than is the 25 to 54 male today. And, Eberstadt notes, “the collapse of work for modern America’s men happened despite considerable upgrades in educational attainment.” The collapse has coincided with a retreat from marriage (“the proportion of never-married men was over three times higher in 2015 than 1965”), which suggests a broader infantilization. As does the use to which the voluntarily idle put their time — for example, watching TV and movies 5.5 hours daily, two hours more than men who are counted as unemployed because they are seeking work.
Eberstadt, noting that the 1996 welfare reform “brought millions of single mothers off welfare and into the workforce,” suggests that policy innovations that alter incentives can reverse the “social emasculation” of millions of idle men.
Reversing social regression is more difficult than causing it. One manifestation of regression, Donald Trump, is perhaps perverse evidence that some of his army of angry men are at least healthily unhappy about the loss of meaning, self-esteem and masculinity that is a consequence of chosen and protracted idleness.

 

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WATCH : Zambian police clash with opposition supporters

Lusaka – A video showing Zambian police clashing with opposition leader Hakainde Hichilema's supporters has emerged on social media.
According to reports, the clashes came after the United Party for National Development (UPND) supporters were denied entry into the police premises where Hichilema and his vice president Geoffrey Mwamba had been detained. 
Watch the Video below 
Hichilema and Mwamba were arrested on Wednesday  in the country's Copperbelt region, after they allegedly attempted to visit party members detained in various prisons.
They were both charged with "unlawful assembly" and "seditious practices".
The two, however, pleaded not guilty to the charges and were released on bail  on Thursday after spending a night in custody. 
They were set to appear in court on October 19. 
If convicted they could face up to seven years in jail.
In the video, angry opposition supporters could be seen chanting, as the cops blocked them from entering the police premises. 
The police officers used batons and clubs to attack them.
According to reports, Hichilema posted on his Facebook page that the two had been denied food , water and blankets while in police cells. 
Hichilema, a wealthy businessman who has run five times for president, disputed the result of August poll which re-elected President Edgar Lungu.
He accused Lungu, the country's election commission and court judges of being guilty of fraud over the August 11 election, which Lungu won by barely 100 000 votes.

 

 94 /100 

Dear Abby: My boyfriend mopes a lot, seldom speaks

Our sex life is great, and the relationship seems like it’s on firm footing. But I can’t shake this feeling he doesn’t want to be here anymore. Sometimes I see him staring out the window as if waiting for something to happen.
If you want to find out what’s going on in your boyfriend’s head, summon up the courage to ask him if he is unhappy in your relationship. If he says you aren’t the problem, explain that you can see his behavior has changed, and tell him that if he’s depressed, he needs to talk about it to a doctor and get a checkup.
There might be a medical reason for his boredom and low energy.
We recently hosted a family party in our home. My sister-in-law arrived with an obviously sick child in tow. I am pregnant and have a 2-year-old son. Now my child and I are sick.
Then I would add that in the future, I do not want anyone to come over if they or one of their children is sick.
That’s not an unreasonable request. Because, regrettably, not all children are vaccinated these days, you are lucky you didn’t catch something that could have put your unborn child at risk.
Because the stationery was expensive, consider having it recut so the monogram is removed and using it for your own personal correspondence. That way, it won’t be wasted.
Good advice for everyone — teens to seniors — is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U. S. funds), to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P. O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

 

 95 /100 

Graham: 3 horror movies that deliver actual chills

October is the golden month for horror movies.
In the weeks leading up to Halloween, when the weather cools down and the leaves start to change color, horror movies fit the mood more than they do any other time of the year. (Our penchant for scares in October is at least partially the root of the recent wave of clown-related creep-outs, which, for once, the Insane Clown Posse has nothing to do with.)
Truthfully, there’s never a bad time for a good scare. The problem is finding movies that actually provide those scares.
I have always been a fan of horror movies, particularly those made in the golden years of the VHS boom (primarily 1983-1988), because their low-budget aesthetics result in cheesy fun.
But when it comes to movies that truly frightened me, that made me not want to be alone in the dark or had me looking out the window to make sure no one was there before I went to sleep, I can name only these three, which deserve to be at the top of any October horror movie marathon:
John Carpenter’s 1978 original, the standard for all slasher movies to come, remains a perfectly executed creepfest. No sequel, reboot or descendant — Freddy Krueger and Jason Voorhees are both children of Michael Myers — was ever able to match the first “Halloween” or the sheer terror of the blank-faced Myers standing on a sidewalk in plain sight or disappearing behind a set of hedges in the middle of the day. Myers is the embodiment of evil, and by terrorizing an idyllic suburban neighborhood, he showed horror can strike anywhere, at anytime. “Halloween” isn’t gory — it’s relatively tame by today’s standards — but there is a brutality to its violence that lingers. And Carpenter’s masterful score — some piano plinks here, a few synth stabs there — is enough to send shivers to this day.
If you’re claustrophobic, “The Descent” will give you the heebie-jeebies. If you’re not claustrophobic, the 2005 movie will make you feel like you are. A group of women go on a spelunking trip in the caves of North Carolina and wind up in some very tight spots, quite literally. Director Neil Marshall closes in on viewers until there’s almost no air left to breathe, capitalizing on the audience’s fear of the dark and of tight spaces, and then he decides to introduce bloodthirsty cave-dwelling demon monsters into the mix. Sheer, unrelenting terror.
If spooky masks give you the willies, this is your “Citizen Kane.” A couple (Scott Speedman and Liv Tyler) head off to a remote vacation home following a friend’s wedding and get an unexpected knock at the door in the middle of the night. “Is Tamara home?” asks the muffled voice. There is no Tamara. From there it’s an all-out assault, as three masked crazies surround the house and torture the couple inside for no reason other than, as they explain in plain, expressionless English, “because you were home.” Director Bryan Bertino creates such an air of dread that the songs on the soundtrack — particularly Joanna Newsom’s “The Sprout and the Bean” and Merle Haggard’s “Mama Tried” — become haunting mood pieces that escalate the film’s already sky-high tension. (I haven’t heard “Mama Tried” since and not thought about “The Strangers.”) A sequel is supposedly on the way, but it will be hard-pressed to be in the same league as the frightening 2008 original.
agraham@detroitnews.com
(313) 222-2284
Twitter: @grahamorama

 

 96 /100 

Newspaper headlines: Tax issues for England pair and 'hard' Brexit warning

The tax affairs of the famous loom large on the front of several papers.
The England football captain, Wayne Rooney, is pictured on the front of the Times. The paper says the striker is facing a £3.5m charge, after the tax authorities challenged a suspected avoidance scheme in which he was the largest investor.
The paper says Rooney used a film investment partnership that generated tax relief for its clients to legally avoid paying tax on his then £4m-a-year salary at Manchester United for three years.
A spokesman for the player said Rooney's tax affairs had always been lawful.
England's interim manager, Gareth Southgate, is on the front of the Daily Mirror.
The paper says the man who stepped in when Sam Allardyce lost his job is "caught up" in schemes run by a firm accused of helping clients avoid hundreds of millions of pounds in tax.
The Mirror says Southgate is one of hundreds of rich investors who are facing a combined bill of more than £400m for unpaid tax, interest and legal fees.
The paper says the caretaker manager has done nothing illegal, but the Mirror columnist, Brian Reade, wearily writes that cash controversies and England managers go together like "Germany and penalty defeats".
"Taxman probes one hundred BBC stars", says the Daily Mail. The paper reports that Revenue and Customs staff are pursuing dozens of the corporation's presenters, for allegedly setting up "personal service companies" to minimise their liabilities.
It quotes the BBC as saying the claims are historical, and the issue is an industry-wide one.
The paper says the BBC staff did not behave improperly, but it quotes the Labour MP, Margaret Hodge, as describing the situation as "disturbing".
Several papers carry reports of a disturbing new phenomenon in the run-up to Halloween - people dressing as clowns to frighten children.
"Clown Terror Sweeps Britain", says the Daily Star. It says clowns with knives and bats have been scaring pupils on their way to school in several parts of the UK.
The Sun has interviewed a police sergeant, who appeals to people not to carry out such "stupid acts" because of the distress they cause.
The Weekend "I" says there have been similar incidents in Australia, and the United States - where police in Utah have warned the public not to shoot clowns.
The paper quotes the president of the World Clown Association, who complains that pranksters have distorted a "clean, wholesome art form".
The Daily Telegraph has a picture of one pumpkin that will probably defy all efforts to hollow it out for Halloween.
The monster vegetable was produced at Chelmsford in Essex, and is thought to be the biggest ever grown outdoors in Britain. It began as a seed from a squash that itself weighed more than a ton.
While the seed cost more than £1,000, it's resulted in a pumpkin that's expected to exceed 1,300 pounds when it's weighed later on Saturday.

 

 97 /100 

Nicky Hilton is a proud mom as she pushes daughter Lily Grace around SoHo

Nicky Hilton is clearly over the moon since giving birth to her baby girl Lily Grace on July 8. The new mom, 33, was in a happy place alongside her offspring as she went with a stroll through New York's SoHo neighbourhood on Friday. Nicky looked ultra chic in a striped pink and blue blouse over dark denim jeans along with a fetching driver's cap. The socialite was seen cooing to her baby girl and smiling with dimples deepening. Since giving birth, Nicky has totally immersed herself in motherhood. Last month, though, Nicky described some of the nail-biting moments she's had to endure - like when she took her daughter in to get her shots. 'I just took her for her first shots today, which was very, very sad,' Nicky told Page Six. 'She started smiling and laughing, which melts my heart every time.' On Twitter, she lamented: 'I think the worst part about being a parent is taking your baby to the doctor to get shots.' She also indicated that springing back to her pre-baby body has been aided by the fact she didn't gain much weight to begin with. While attending New York Fashion Week in Septmber, Nicky looked as slim as ever. 'I haven't worked out once since I have given birth,' the new mom told Page Six.

 

 98 /100 

Pregnant Molly Sims looks perky in polka dots with daughter Scarlett in Santa Monica

She is currently pregnant with her third child. And on Friday, Molly Sims enjoyed a day of shopping in Santa Monica, California with daughter Scarlett Stuber. The tiny tot, one, sat peacefully in her pram as her model mum pushed her along. Scroll down for video  Molly was both chic and comfortable in a sheer, polka dot dress that featured a high-slit bottom. The pretty mum wore her medium length locks down and curled, and at one point, used her shades to keep her hair away from her face. Adorable little Scarlett was styled in a white tank top, printed skirt and leggings. Since announcing her third pregnancy in August, Molly has kept her followers updated courtesy of her Youtube channel. On Thursday,  the wife of Scott stuber, who's currently in her second trimester, released a video detailing her battle with morning sickness. 'I was in New York and I threw up on the Long Island expressway next to a homeless man,' began Molly.  'And then when I went to get crackers inside of the gas station after throwing up, I almost threw up again because of the smell in the gas station. While this happened at the beginning of her second trimester, she has said that she is definitely much better now. Molly also looked back on her first trimester.  'I think the first trimester was so hard... Just to get my mind around, okay, "holy s***, I'm having another baby! I'm having three babies under four-years-old. "' 'And I think that took a second to really set in. And also, I think being so tired and just everything happening at once and being so sick, I definitely have much more of "okay I can do this attitude,"' she said.

 

 99 /100 

Closing time comes early for 'Cheers Live on Stage'

It’s last call for “Cheers Live on Stage,” the re-creation of the classic NBC sitcom now playing at Chicago’s Broadway Playhouse.
Producers announced late Friday that the show will close after Sunday’s performance, two weeks earlier than originally planned. Refunds are available for people holding tickets for Oct. 10-23 performances.
That’s not the last of the witty banter for the ersatz Sam, Diane, Norm and the rest, though. The Chicago run of “Cheers Live” was part of a tour that began in Boston and is scheduled to continue Oct. 28 in St. Louis and proceed to 11 other cities through February.
And Friday’s notice promised an upcoming announcement about “additional touring partners and a route for a 2017-18 national tour.”
Meanwhile, the cast and crew don’t have to go home, but they can’t stay here.

 

 100 /100 

The American Spectator

It is time for Donald Trump to go back to Trump Tower. Time for Mike Pence to move to the top of the ticket. Time for Marco Rubio or my favorite, Lindsey Graham, to move to the veep spot. It’s just time.
Now, don’t think I am a neocon. I’m not. I’m an old conservative. My father and mother were avid conservatives. My grandparents on both sides were GOP people, and that’s going back to before World War One.
And I’m not fickle. I have only a few good qualities, and loyalty is at the top of the list. I have never backed down on my support of and love for Richard M. Nixon. To me, he was the ultimate peacemaker, and created two generations of peace. I will never turn my back on him. I have been with my wife for 50 years and would not turn on her no matter what she did. Loyalty is sacred to me.
But I am a Republican and we are supposed to stand for some kind of moral standard. We are the party of Dwight Eisenhower, who never had the slightest moral stain on his character. We’re the party of Reagan, whose charisma was based on his basic dignity. We’re the party of George W. Bush, who made terrible mistakes, but whose fundamental morality was never in doubt. He is a handsome man and was much sought after by women, but never even returned the gaze of flirting women. He was no prude, but he was dignified.
Now comes Donald Trump. He talked on a hot mike about the most lewd acts imaginable on women he had just met or maybe did not even know. He talked on a hot mike about grabbing women by their genitals and getting away with it because he was rich and famous.
He now says that Bill Clinton has said much the same and worse. So what? I wouldn’t want Bill Clinton to be leading the Republican Party either. I want someone clean, after eight years of Barack Obama mess and lies and deceit. I don’t want someone who talks like a dirty-minded eighth grader leading the greatest party on earth.
I disagreed with Trump on trade and taxes and Hispanics. But I stood up for him on TV and in print because he was a force for change and washing out the slop-filled stables of DC and because he was not afraid to be non-PC.
But this is too much. I do not claim to be a better person than he is. I’m not at all. But I’m not fit to be President either.
The hour is desperately late. At this rate, Mr. Trump is leading my party to catastrophe, to a whipping at the hands of a radicalized Democrat party in the Congress, and the White House, too.
But if Mr. Trump can do the right thing, drop out, if the party can elevate Pence, get a great Veep, all can still be saved.
Donald Trump, for once do the right thing. Take your boasts and your swindles and your dirty jokes and your jet and go back home and let our great party try to save itself and the nation. Saying you are in the same league as Bill Clinton is the last straw.


Total 100 articles.
Created at 2016-10-08 16:11


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